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Full text of "Carpenter"

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A Monthly Journal for Carpenters, Stair Builders, Machine Wo od Workers, Planing Mill Men, and Kindred Interests 5 
E^abl^d ^Sl 1 : ! PHILADELPHIA, JANUARY, 1899. 



I Fifty Cents Per Year. 
1 Single Copies, 5 Cts. 



Henry Disston & Sons, 5 Stt keystone 

* Philadelphia, pa., u.s. a. * SAW, TOOL, STEEL AND FILE WORKS 



30 

er, 
are 



SAWS, FILES AND TOOLS FOR THE MARKETS OF THE WORLD. 

No. ' ndSaw. 



L 




Jers' 
the 
i st 
sons 
since 
with 
cant 



Our Saws have nil the Lfttcftt Improvements, and are warranted superior to all others 



lmpt..vr'Vnchlnerv' In l '■" SrtS' ,h "* h >™' ] ^ner.,1 utility, and ore made from the best steel, and ,.f superior temper 

1>I 



makes them the easiest running Saws in the world. 



The grinding, by our New a 



and 
i now 
te of 



JML^LI it" rrt. m ' n ! ^ Vho,csak - Welail Hardware D-.der. in America and Europe. 

1 remiumsi at .1,1 the \\ orra's (,t> at 1 an « Ijera they li ive lieen exhibited, 

And we (iuarantee a better Article, at the same Price, than any other House in the World. 

A I.I. ffOODJH H SARIN' Q QOa NAMK AHI KL'LI.V WAKHANTED 



rhey have gained a universal reputation among mecnani.' hour 
The manufactures 1 f this firm have secured the high* other 



n fierce 
trdttys 



TAINTOR 
POSITIVE 
SAW SET 

rhnUMnd* <>f I' h 1 

lint., linn • <! il, milt llirv 

■I'"- ht|(lit| raKtmpudfd liy 

^ I.I. M In, •>.,,,, 




ir jour Hard war* DmI- 

W uol hati.il.. II,,. i,,, 

il*n»'i i.ih« Hi, tnfertur m>I 

' I«< »oru» imt Mia, 

It') |„.« . .,,| .. 

TAlNlOR MFC. 00. 

9 to 15 MURRAY ST. 





-5 ts had 

public 
^ . eight- 
's per day. 
*|fi passed 
7 all city 
a to con- 
s doing city 



UNION CARPENTERS ASK FOR 

N EWBURGH, KEYSTONE, UNION -Mi}^;^; 

Overalls, Coats, Pants ^ Carpenters' r er il 13 * ar " 



FOB SALE BY DEALERS IN BUILDERS HARDWARE 



THE ONLY ABSOLUTELY NOISELESS 
DOOR HANGER ON THE MARKET... 



Your dealer will gladly 
furnish you these ex- 
cellent goods if you ask 
for them. 



Cur, 

Made, 

Sold, 



^*|"lsion to pay 

for Sunday 
pen- 

Right.^ 

y for 




CLEVELAND & WHITEHILL CO. 

NEWETJSGrH , 



Kot Kottotn Price* 
Mrnti ii ilns paper 



Tlir McCat* Parlor 
i ».n>r (iaugei , N>>. 



The McCabe Hanger Manufacturing Co. 

532 W 22d Strert N. Y City. 

"TRUli AS A DJE." 

WROUGHT STEEL LOCKS 

oKoun: FINISH 
Strong, Durable, Inexpensive 

l or Sale by all Hardware Dealers 

Carpenter* win sppieciste the fact that Hie 
in' . uremeuU of these lock* nw and .Must be 
eaai i, as true as r die can make them. No 
trouble and vexation in fitting .... 

< llt,t]() k iii- »>r Wroujlil Me.- 1 Uirlm Mini Luck 

HflM. '"' H|t|tllv«(t<IIl 

RUSSELL & ERWIIM M'F'G CO. 

Britain, Conn. Ohtoago. New York. 

PhlladelphU. Baltimore. 



MOORE'S 

IMPROVED WROUGHT STEEL STORM c 
WINDOW FASTENERS 



tera' 
hi in 
the 
>nth. 
men. 
the 
an 
'iuess 



>. 




rpen- 
d it 



With these fasteners, sto windows can , lters 
l>e adjusted moru easily, and hel.i in place 11 m 

tther way yet ight* 
s on 
here 
jent. 



more securely than la Bit 
Ibvauted. 



NO LADDER REQUIRED. 

Fastened from the inside, the only tool K 



necessary being t small h i mer. 
8etnl for ( irvular*. 

The Stanley Works, 

Nl.W BWITA1N, CONN. 

7t> Chambers St 



i >r 




Jl^Ksui- 



\ 



THE CARPHHTKK 



HlQH Q...MDE MACHINERY 




CARPENTERS, BUILDERS, SASH, 
DOOR, BUND MAKERS, ETC. 



STANDARD WOOD WORKING MACHINERY 



won 



No J Tmm W< i . Wctun. 
A totuii i a ittklf mactM tot ( irpenten, 
Kilkto-i, t*««h, Door *ni HI. ml White™, el*., 

rartelj nf work 



rhich would 
1 



> 011 Uncle 

cheerfully furnished. 

Aak fer " Wood Worker" Catalogue 

J. A. Fay & Co M 

mm W. Front St., 
CINCINNATI, OHIO. 




OF EVERY DESCRIPTION. 



If Id utd of rnijthlBC In «ur 11m r .nnH «• to 



No. 1 Plahbb, Mat* nan aB» Mouu>«k. 
PlMirt, one aide, 34 Iodic* wido by fl luohea 
thick. 

Matehsa 11 inches *tde; 
A a I riTaJuable machine for m small or medium 



312 page eatatogue free If yte 
have aood use for It. 



The Egan Company, 



4 06- 416 W. Front Street, 

.CINCINNATI, OHIO. 



FOOT & HAND POWER MACHINERY 



c*n • nvt's- In 1 
by ufttng fiui 

Mac '*tlS &C . 
»» WutOI SI 



E TE OUTFITS. 

ultder* without steam power 
..ro pile with (he large shops 
* t abor Savins flat binary. 

< TM*L. C*T*lOGUt FHtt. 

■ALLS MFG. CO. 

cnccaFalU, N.V..U.S A 



HE LATEST AND BEST. 




US.* 




OUR NO, 141 
UPRI OHT MOU LDER 

Cutters can be kept low oil 
spindles at all times. 

Spindles are of beBt cruci- 
ble steel, witb taper bear- 
ings — top and bottom— and 
run in phosphor bronze box- 
es, the upper boxes being of 
the "fountain" type, supply- 
ing a continual flow of oil 
over nil parts of the bearing. 

Write us for further infor- 
mation, also for new cata- 
logue. 

S. A. WOODS MACHINE CO. 
South 




18 'BY 20 INCHES. 

^bbbbbbbbbbbbb>-w ^^^^—^^ 

SitiPtx, P^eneA 
Price: 



THE SQUARE ROOT 

DELINEATOR 

OR KCY T0THf.,5TCa .•TUA/K . 

BY A. W. WOODS , 

G/Vt&l/i FLAW r<SUfj£S . m L >&p*t. 

roq eves am uttcvtK ph «| 

5tHf r»w. PA*- Pf*S<~l $',00 

HE CARPENTER,. ■ 1 MAWEU W ; g*J 

«■ ■ - ■rB^aa^a^SBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBB»wa^SBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBmg»»;«jnm-»'J 




MANUFACTlREt SAU<1ATUCK, CONN. 

Carpenters* Bench and Moulding 

PLANES 

. , Hand Made. 



at 4 



ttANDLto, 

jf MALLETS, fltc, 



rOUH HAKDWAmm OMMLmm POM 

DOSCHER'S PLANES 



ARCHITECTURAL DRAWING 

AraMtaotnre : VKtiiil™ i Mechanical Drawing] Klaetrlalty i Btaa 
tonary. LjeoiiiQliva or Hirm«i Civil Kuam«*rln« i R»llru»d 
EniiDffn if; Mu.il.lpnl Euaioaorlng, Mydrailtlo XnilDMrlnSl 71 
Voti and Halal Mining i Pro. peeling, »nd the Kuallah. Bran shea. 

Th, c, nrt-i<H,tiiiii.i„s * Lit aJil.ti..,i in Anlfcflialw. *i lltal lo.nrull II li *a)y a 1 1 1 in ry 
tataoi, how !■> r*..l ati<l vruv. Arekitoeiar, offtn ij-lMdid epptrtaeUI*, lo ■ m.q ami,!* 



limit In buroni* nlf-mrr-minc. Siml.itta m*li* r»| ,4 tomftrMa ia Inrniaf to Uraw ant 

unlit I 

MR 



A tafc i l awhiaaamli ttaa»14ar«a laltUa aatif iMU^aaiMM uw*i>« u.» !)■• 
jluiua, no matirr kaa laal ,i aMi u.« n r bn uft«n u nil !•» mrwitt U r»ti«w. 



9tm«mUr -- ~ ' *" "If ITt. t*IB<IHit Blai|ltBit 

He International Correspondence Schools, B3 MB, Scran ton, fa 



OWER k LYON, 



96 Cham bar a Straat, 

NEW YORK. 

FINE TOOLS. 

Chaplin's Pat. Planes. 

Corrugated Face or Smooth Paee. 

Rubber Handlea or Enameled 
Wood Handles. 

LEVER ADJUSTMENT. 
TOWER'S CHAMPION SCREW DRIVERS, 

Tarta* Ttwf h Jtempif, i Solid Tan^.d Bolster, Haary Mall Parol., Flnud Handlrg. 





i of Wood 



The IsrgattaBd inu.t 
ittM 
■I Blaatiluary In 
orld for Ckrpaa. 
Jalnen auid 



cam pi 
workii 
tha 
tara 

■II7 



n Wood Worklaf 
Maonis. Go. 

tvoc'NMoaa to 
r H. Clamant Co.. Olan foT. 
Men. Go , Ltd., (KMdell A 
Water,, Hoyl A Mm Co., 
Tha La, l Iliiuatou Oo , 
Lehman Met) Co., MU«an- 
kac Bandar Mlf Co., U B 

Hocer, a oo., UowWr <* Offices i — 
Harmanoe Co.. wniiara, 
gon Men. Oo., Yoant tiro*. 

aalea room and (Hal* roar raautra- 
«*" Botto 7° t^hnreh 8 'and I llaSln - 



ALLEN B. RORKE 

Builder %m 

and 

Contractor 



PHILADELPHIA 



^ttawtltt^l 



ARB OF IIHTiTIOMI. 




rr- "-r 



Be r:rt Ue trade mark OHAHPloif Is on 

— 



Sworn Circulation of THE CARPEI'TER 

- !9,00J COPIES MONTHLY 



in | f odium for Tool Manufacturers, Wood 
-ft > ry, Hardware, Lumber and Building* 
'•o i if Special Advantage to Conu actors, 



. linees Men 




v 



Satisfaction 

is given all around when the house Is 
trimmed with Sargent's Hardware. The 
Architect is pleased because he speci- 
fied it ; the owner Is pleased each time 
he looks at the trimmings because they 
add so much to the beauty of the home, 
and everybody is pleased with the work- 
ing ul Sargent's Easy Spring Locks. 

Sargent & Company, 

Maker* ol Artietif linr.lware and fine Lm**, 
New York , and New Haven, Coon. 




B*.< 



■41 



1 



\ 



1 

i 



\ 



L I 




A Monthly Journal for Carpenters, Stair Builders, Machine Wood Workers, Planing Mill Men, and Kindred Interests. 



VOL. XIX.-No. I, 
Established 1831. 



} PHILADELPHIA, JANUARY, 1899. 



{ 



Fifty Cents per Year. 
Single Copies, 5 Cts. 



Report of the Hoard of Canvassers 



PhiLA , PA , Dec. i$, iN.,s. 

This is to certify that we have can- 
vassed the returns on the proposed 
amendments and resolutions submit- 
ted by the New York Convention, with 
tht result as shown below. We find 
that all the questions have been car- 
ried by the necessary two thirds ma- 
jorities, with the exception of the two 
resjlutions and amendments Nos. six 
and fifteen. 

Canvassers, 

M A. Maher, 

I, U l<»). Brooklyn, N. Y . 

D F. I'KATHF.RSTON, 

L U 715, New York, 
Wesi.kv C Hall, 
L. U. \ Philadelphia 



1 







Mltol 


"■•nil 


No. 1 


5. 1 >9 


3 93* 




" 2 


2,423 


4 hi, 


1 • 


Amendment 


Pot 


A R aiml 


Krsolt 


No. l 


6 4^5 


794 


Carried, 


" 2 


S Bo6 


1,742 


* 1 


" 3 


$, '.2 


2,oi(> 


4 ■ 


" 4 


g (Us 


1,698 


1 4 


" 5 


447 


953 


1 ■ 


" 6 


4 


3i 105 


Lost. 


1 1 - 

1 




' 193 


Carried. 


«' « 


571 ' 


1 . 56 1 


.1 


" 9 


S.4W 


1 ,462 


1 « 


" :o 


6 0>,2 


9I9 




" ii 


4,993 


1 (69 


>■ 


" !2 


5, ''9- 


1,062 




" U 


4 'J4'< 


I 




" M 


4.947 


2.<*H 




" PS 


3 1 4 


3.353 


I.OSt. 


M 16 


M55 


2. n 5 


Carried. 


" 17 


6,03 1 


1,019 




" IS 


5 96 ■ 


739 




" I.j 


5.«47 


707 




" 20 


s.220 


1,35a 




'• 21 


s 26H 


1.337 
872 


i. 


" 22 


M*9 


<■ 


" 


5 74.1 


703 


■ ' 


" 2;J 




1,366 


11 


" 2C, 


4 195 


1,946 


11 


" lh 


4 14' 


»,04'. 


11 


" 27 


s 019 


1.477 


,1 


" 28 


5.167 


1.253 


■ 1 


U j ( , 


5.7"2 


910 


1 . 


" s* 


S 35» 


1. 039 


■ t 






651 


» 


S i 


.S.893 


f«J4 


ti 


" 33 


5.KK1 


693 


11 


" 91 


5.278 


1,238 


«i 


" H 


5,6l6 


787 


.1 


" v 


S,6og 


996 


11 


" 35 




726 


M 


" ,i» 


5,869 


594 


11 


H 39 


5.SI8 


952 


11 


» 40 


.S.05.S 


711 


ii 


11 - 


5.919 


584 


11 




8.6m 


717 


11 




5.534 


78S 


11 


" 


5.700 


550 


11 




5.751 


54*' 


i< 




5.692 


521 


1. 


M 


5.880 


47' 


11 


J * 


5.780 


524 


ii 




5.738 


<66 


u 


5. 111 




11 



General Secretary' Treasurer 
P. J. McGuirb was confined to bed 
several days this month very seriously 
ill with the prevalent malady, La 
Grippe. 



Important Notice. 



f 



Under the new constitution as 
amended, and now in effect since 
January ist. all appeals of members. 
Unions and District Councils, must 
be sent to the General President to be 
passed upon by him, also all By-Laws 
and Trade Rules of Local Unions, and 
amendments to same must be sub- 
mitted to him. None of this business 
should be sent the General Secretary- 
Treasurer. 

Hereafter send all appeals, by laws 
and trade rules to General President 
John Williams, Utica, N. Y. / 



The G. E. B. wu in session this 
month for two weeks at the general 

office. 

J* 

New Constitutions are now ready. 
$5 per ioo. Send in your orders with 
the cash to the G. S.-T. 



Send in your list of local officers for 
the present term on the regular official 
postal if you have not done to. 



Password and blanks for present 
quarter were sent last month to all 
unions in good standing. If not 
received send word to the G. S.-T. 



The December issue of The Car- 
penter was not lasued for good rea- 
sons made known to the Locals in the 
quarterly circular. This shortage will 
be made good to subscribers and ad- 
vertisers. 

General vote in detail on resolu- 
tions and amendments to the consti- 
tution as agreed on at the New York 
convention will be found on pages 
10-14 of this issue. The amendment 
providing for a $20 charter fee end a 
minimum of 60 cents per month dues 
were the only ones defeated. All the 
olhwn were carried. This is the first 
■e since 1S86 where the work of 
|hl invention was ao uniformly 
'ed. 

I 

, I - 




Joliet, Ml. Union carpenters on 
the tin plate mill made a stand against 
non- Union carpenters working on the 
job last month and were successful. 
Jt 

Denver, Colo.— Union 55 has 
formed a Carpenters Union Hall com- 
pany with $10,000 capital stock to 
erect a hall in this city and has incor- 
porated said company. 

** 

Miners in Van Anda mine, Texado 
Island, British Columbia, were suc- 
cessful in their strike for the eight- 
hour day and $3.50 per day, instead 
of the ten-hour day at $3 per day. 
J* 

V*»**>'<-'«« B <"* — Thm TraH»» 

and Labor Council Is pushing very 
strongly for the general adoption of 
the eight hours. The Carpenters' 
Union is now working on that baaiB. 
> 

Efforts are being strenuously 
made to pass a state eight-hour law 
through the Legislature at Washing- 
ton. It is on the lines of the present 
eight hour bill now before the United 



and I 



Minneapolis, Minn.— Union 7 Is 
going to secure a better scale of wages 
this season. Brother L. P. Blake- 
field is our Business Agent and he is 
doing herculean service for us and for 
Union 87 of St Paul. 

Jersey City, N. J.— Carpenters and 
other building trades are pushing for 
the eight-hour day next spring The 
Building Trades Council Is doing ex- 
cellent work and has a live Business 
Agent in the field for all the Unions. 

Carpenters in Duluth, Minn., 
North Adams, Mass., Racine, Wis., 
and Fort Smith, Ark., lately adopted 
nine hours s day. Vancouver, British 
Columbia, Seattle, Wash., and Spo- 
krie. Wash, have secured eight 
hours a day. 

J» 

Carpenters and masons On the 
new People's Bank building, Passaic, 
N. J., went on strike last month to 
get several weeks' wages dne them 
and they were successful. Mcllvaln 
and Hukefem, of Pittsburg, Pa,, were 
the 



St. Louis, Mo,, which 
by the O, E. B., 



5, 1895 disbanded last month, end 
its members have again become con- 
nected with the U. B. The charter, 
books and property of Union 4 are 
now in the hands of the G. S -T. 
> 

Topeka, Kan.— Master Builders' 
Association agreed to enforce the 
eight-hour day after September ist 
last, and the stone and brick masons 
are observing that rule ever since 
May ist What is the matter with 
the Topeka carpenters that they can t 
get the eight-hour day ? 

The big department 
office buildings in 
required to pay the Union rate of 
thirty-seven and a half cents per hour 
to carpenters, the same as on other 
jobs. Chicago carpenters also enforce 
the rale of a half holiday on Saturdays 
during the summer months. 

Union 131, Seattle, Wash., has had 
a number of very successful public 
meetings, and Is enforcing the eight- 
hour day and a scale of $2 50 per day. 
The City Council of Seattle has passed 
an eight -hour ordinance for all city 
work, and applying alike to 
tractors 
work. 

In preparing the buildings in the 
camp for the sick troops at Montauk 
Point, N. Y , last summer, it ta nar- 
rated there was no provision to pity v 
the carpenters double pay for Sunday 
work, whereupon the Union carpen- 
ters on the job all donated the entire 
Sunday's labor to get the needed! 
buildings finished without delay for 
the sick soldiers. 

J* 

St. Louis, Mo —The Carpenters' 
Unions of this city were successful In 
getting proper recognition on the 
Lincoln Trust building this month. 
The fight was against non -Union men. 
The Wabash Railroad Company, the 
owners of the building, attempted ta- 
in) unction suit against ButinessT? 



s 



Ukioh 




ters District Council, but dropped it. 
J* 

Galveston, Tex — The Carpenters' 
Unions of this city were successful in 
enforcing the recognition of the eight- 
hour rule, and Union conditions 
the work of the new fortifications] 
for the United States Government. 
The engineers have been working 
men eleven hours a dfty. 
of the law. Congressman Hawley, 
Oils city, was» very ^jjrfM t" 
ing a department 



4 



2 



* 



London Letter. 



IIV THOMAS REECK 



London, Dec. ul —Carpenters and 
joiners are among the best organized 
workmen In Great Britain and Ire- 
land. Three principal Unions appeal 
for their support, and are each in a 
state of extreme vigor. The leading 
society is, of course, the Amalga 
mated Society of Carpenters and 
Joiners, with considerably over fifty 
thousand members, and a record ot 
perpetual progress since its establish 
ment in tS6»> Its continually grow 
ing prosperity and potency are well 
shown io the following comparative 
totals : The membership at ♦ lie end of 
1892 was 17 58S ; at the end of iSjj, 
40,996; 1894. 4304 1: l%5, 14 155: 
1S96, 4S,6.u During the same five 
years the annual Income rose from 
$494,595 to 5632,035 ; whilst the ex- 
penditures rose only from >454 225 to 
5500, 720. The balance on hand, 
which was S .-,95, 050 at the end of 1892, 
had accumulated to $504 Sio by the 
end of 1896, and at the end of Sep- 
tember, 1898, stood at just upon eight 

hundred thousand dollars. 

• « • # 

The o;her two principal Unions, 
whilst they are a long way behind 
tho Amalgamated in numbers and in 
tot si/ of their banking accounts, 
still thieve considerable success. 
The Associated Carpenters and Join- 
era Is a Trade Union confined to Scot- 
land, where it has 148 branches and 
some 8,000 members. I take the 
figure;, of the latest governmental 
report, which carries these statistics 
down. to the beginning of 1897 The 
membership of the Associated in- 
creased from 6,270 in 1892, to the 
above figure in 1 896 ; whilst its funds, 
after chopping and changing very 
much In the interim, ended up In 1896 
just about where they were in 1892— 
at about fifty thousand dollars. Its 
Income registered an Increase, during 
the five years from #48 150 to #66.- 
'•40: anl Its expenditure increased 
f'om $40,400 to $48,600 At certain 
dates, however, during the progress 
"of the &ve year*, both income and 
expenditure rose to figures far higher 
than any of the above, and the resnlt 
was a loss to the society of quite 

five and twenty thousand dollars. 
* * # # 

The least of the three Unions under 
nilderation Is the General Union of 
erative Carpenters and Joiners, 
hich is the doyen of them all, as it 
was founded in 1837. Its member- 
ship has fluctuated more than has 
been the case with its co societies, 
and whilst it registered 5 669 in De 
ocmher, 1896 as against 3,645 In 1893, 
It JU in irt V 4. for example, climbed 
up to 7,000 Its income nearly doubled 
in the five years, 1S92-6, whilst Its 
expenditure increased at a very much 
•lower rate, thus enabling the General 
Union to increase its funds from $6,- 
*55 to $s i, 680, relatively by far the 
belt financial record of any of the 

Unions. 

* * * * 

None of these soe'eties have their 
headquarters in London. The Amal- 
gamated Society centralizes at Man- 
tester, the Associated in Edinburgh 
and the General Union in Liverpool. 
Although the Associated Carpenters 



notice that the Amalgamated Society 
has upward of forty ranches over the 
Border with between three and four 
thousand menders, fust what stands 
in the way of an amalgamation of 
the^e societies, which by covering the 
same teirttory and interacting in so 
complicated a fashion seem destined 
for one another. I cannot as yet say 
with ■ttthority. One difficulty Is no 
doubt the diffeient scales of benefits 
and the consequent differences in con- 
tributions and levies. The average 
.ttuount of Income contributed in a 
vt ar to his society by a member of the 
Amalgamated Is thirteen dollars, as 
against $7 75 on the part of a General 
Union member, and $8.25 on the part 
of a member of the Scottish combina- 
tion 

There Is, or was, a tiny little inde- 
pendent Trade Union of carpenters in 
Northampton, called the Northampton 
Local Operative Carpenters and Join- 
ers Friendly and Trade Society which 
has preserved its autonomy for no 
particular reason since 1859. When 
I last heard of it, Its roll contained 
only seventeen names and for aught I 
know the waves of time may have 
since obliterated it. It must have 
been a curiosity. 

* # # * 

In London the carpenters ate well 
organized, there being seventy seven 
branches of the Amalgamated Society 
alone, with a total membership of 
about six thousand. The largest 
single branches are those at Fulham, 
(a West Loudon district), Edgeware 
Road, Clapham, and Clerkenwell, with 
237, 196, n*3 and 190 members respec- 
tively. London also has as its espe- 
cial prerogative the only trade organiz- 
ation of carpenters which I have not 
yet mentioned. The Perseverance 
Society of Carpenters and Joiners 
perseveres in spite of everything. It 
has eight branches and about four 
hundred members. It was born in the 
same year as the Amalgamated Society 
but is confined to the metropolis. 
There was another attempt to start a 
London society but when the bantling 
rose to the dignity of 200 members 
and then the year after dropped to 
about a hundred the organ i/ers very 
wisely amalgamated it with the Gen- 
eral Union, which occurred in 1895. 
Of two other attempts to start inde- 
pendent trade societies, one has dis- 
solved sfter six years of fruitless agita- 
tion, whilst the other had its regis- 
tration cancelled in 1897 when it was 
three years old. 

* « # <• » 
My space grows to a close and I 
should like, after this brief sketch of 
the carpenters and joiners combina- 
tions of the British Isles, to make 
some mention of the heroic and frater- 
nal way In which they have supported 
their industrious fellows in the fight 
for better conditions of labor. Take 
just one instance, the now historical 
engineers' lock-out. The Amalgamated 
Society of Carpenters and Joiners 
donated nearly thirty three thousand 
dollars to the fund for the support of 
the engineers ; the Associated Society, 
$2,475; the General Union, $1,730; 
and the Perseverance Society, $300. 
Such forces as these make for all 
that is best in modern society, and 
ta record their doings Is the keenest 



rrzi 




Scarfing. 



Scarfing a g*rder at different joints 
wherever it is practicable should be 
made directly over a post, as illus- 
trated by the above drawings Figs. 1 
and 2, which will be found sufficiently 
strong. 

It Is hardly possible to find a 
stronger method of scarfing than that 
shown in Fig. 1. In this design (Fig. 
1), the post is framed into the plate or 
bolster which should be fully equal 
in size to the timber which it sup- 



ports ; In heavy framing It should . 
from 5 to «> feet long, with side braes 
framing into it and bolted at bottom 
to post The bolster la bolted to 
timber by means of '. inch bu' i, 
depending entirely on basis of lo I 
which it Is to carry. 

Fig. 1 shows another lean expeas ve 
system of scarfing making it che ier 
in construction but will not ataa aa 
heavy load, nor is It conjldcrec by 
any means as good as that ahem In 
Fig. 1. 

Chas L 




What the United 



Below It ■ Hit of the citlea and towns when 
earpeoterk make it a rule to work only 
hours a day : 



Alameda, Cal. 

Aita Uiiua Tel. 
Ashland, Wis. 
Austin, 111. 
Bakcrsficld Cal. 
Bedford Park, N. V. 
Berkeley. Cal 
Bessemer Col, 
Brighton Park. III. 
Brooklyn, K. Y. 
Caronrfclet. Mo. 
Chicago, 111 
Chicago Heights, 111. 
Cleveland, O. 
Corona, N, Y. 
Cripple Creek, Col. 
Denver, Col. 
Detroit, Mtch. 
Kaat St. Louis, III. 
HI D ira. Col. 
Klmhurst, III. 
Engle wood , 111. 
Hureka, Cal. 
K vault on, 111. 
Flushing, N. V. 
Fremont, Col. 
Fresno Cal 
Galveston, Tea. 
Glletle, Col. 
Grand Crowing, III. 
Hauthvitle, Ind. 
If auford. Cal. 
Highland Park, 111. 
Hitchcock, Tea. 
Hyde Park, III. 
Independence, Col. 
Indianapolis, Ind. 
trviigton, N ]. 
Kansai City, Mo. 
Kensington, 111. 
Klit gib ridge, N. Y. 
La Junta. Col. 
Lake Forest, III. 
Lead vl tie, Col. 
Long Island City, N. Y 

laywood, ... 
Memr' 'a, Tet u. 



I/OS Angeles, 
M .°y w - 



III. 



Mllwai kee, V * 
M0r.1ret.tud, lit. 
Mt. Vernon, W. Y. 
Ml, Verr-on, Ind 



Murphy •boro. III, 
Newark, N J. 
New Brighton. N. Y. 
Newtown, N Y. 
New York, N. Y. 
Oakland, Cal. 
Oak Park. 111. 
Omaha. Neb. 
Orange, N. J. 
Ouray, Cel. 
Pasadena, Cal. 
Port Richmond, N. Y. 
Pueblo, Col. 
fcandabuig, Cat, 
Rochester, N Y. 
Rogers Park, III. 
Sacramento, Cal. 
Salt Lake, ( Uh. 
San Antonio, Tel. 
Ban Francisco, Cat. 
San I.uls Obispo, Cal. 
San lose, Cal. 
Han kafuel.Cal. 
Ban La Barbara, Cal. 
Seattle, Wash. 
Sheboygan. Wis. 
South Chicago, 111. 
South Denver, Col, 
South Kvanston, III. 
South Knglewood. III. 
South Omaha. Neb, 
Spokane, Wash. 
Springfield. III. ' 
St. Louis, Mo. 
Stapletoa, N. Y. 
Stockton, Cal. 
Swampacott Maaa. 
Syracuse, N Y. 
Texas City, Tea. 
Town of Lake. III. 
Trenton t, If. Y. 
Untonport, N. Y. 
Van Neat.N. Y. 
Venice, III. 
Victor, Col. 
Waeo, Tex. 
Waehlngton. D C. 
Westchester, N, Y. 
Whatcom. Wash 
Wllllamebridge, N. T. 
WoodUwn.rf. t\ 
Yookers. If. V. 



The Dotted Brotherhood of Csrpcr.li a and 
Joiners ot America was rounded in an .•■Boa 
at Chicago, August 12 DM. At Brat It had oat* 
twelve local unions and t.lgf members ow.iei 
seventeen years, It hesgown to nurnhf; * local 
Unions in 408 cities, an! has ever (MfSf 
members It la organised to protect toe 
ter Trade from the erf* of ow ni fees m 
work ; Its aim la to eneout ■ ft a hlghr 
of skill and better wage ; to raxwM sh 
Apprentice System, and </ aid nasi * Id 
members by muruel pro! ction and be i 
means; it pay! a Wife Funeral Benefit i ' I 
tV, to fSO; s Members l usters! BeneS .t (Vie 
pxi; and a Disability beaeSt, 11 00 to MB In 
these General Benefits fSMM have -ei< e«- 
pended the peal two years, and fftSS, TO e*« th« 
year JUKI, while f6H3 (Ml more were apet la kat 
pet lad lor Sick Benefits by the local 'alone 
Tblt U fully One and a Oaarter MilUoe 4 f *>l- 
larsexpended for benevolent sad chart! let-ur 
poses. Such an organisation Is worth ' t el' eh- 
tlou of every Carpenter. The Brothi ■ «"■> In 
also a Protective Trade Union an a t • 

Benevolent Society, it has rained the age in 
hundreds of elites, and placed tally P e and ■ 
Half Million Dollars more wages an sally la 
the pockets of the Carpenters In those ties. It 
reduced the hours of labor to S stwn day as 
106 dtiee, and * houra a day in f nr bun. 
died and twcnty-eU cMlen, net to inenh of 
many cities which have established th# I an I • 
hour system on Saturdays, ly In tWW 
15130 more men have gained em- ifWenl. 
Thle la the lesuU of thotrj*gh^ l j £ B £ B " 

and «rV"1tae*nIo«y has been aeVhi i etrlhee 
by this eodety. It la mot a secret e \ -bound 
All competent Car* \ « are 
1 taenia \ <* to 

> am >l 

application for mcmberabuj. la the < 
Onion In your city, It, la a 





THE CARPENTER. 



T 



Modern Scaffolds and Their Con- 
struction. 



ItV OWEN ll. MACtNNIS. 



HE change of the form of 
buildings, and the material 
methods of construction 
have ao changed the 
methods of scaffolding in 
modern buildings that a short disser- 
tation on the methods now employed 
may prove of service to many car- 
penters. 

Carpenter scaffolds may be classed 
under three heads, namely, those 
which are supported by being attached 
to some part or parts of a building, 
those which are self supporting 
and those which can be moved, or 
portable scaffolds 



from tipping b - a wrought iroi dis- 
connecting druble hook in two 
halvcB, til* bottom hooking under a 
floor beam and the top over the inside 
end of the scaffold beam or plank. 
This disconnecting hook is made as 
represented in Fig. 2, of % inch by 
2 Inch wrought iron and bolted 
together with one or two % bolts, 
as wen in the engraving. A, Fig 1, 
is the end view of the floor beam, and 
C, one bolt. R ill bolt placed under 
the bottom edge of the plank to pre- 
vent its dropping out of the hook. 
F, Is the scaffolding planks placed on 
the top edge outside the wall, and G 
is the cross sectton of a piece of 2 x 4 
placed and nailed so as to wedge the 
cantilever beam against one side of 
the window frame. 




0c> 



3 % /$ 



1 — r 
1 I 
1 . 



B 1 r^l^^n 

1 J ZTTTe 



J I 

f ! " 




Fit;, t. 



In the first class I would Include 
the ordinary bracket- scaffolds for 
frame buildings which are so familiar 
to every carpenter as to require no 
description here, also all scaffolds 
which are bracketed with uprights 
and nailed to door and window frames, 
corner boards, etc., and the hanging 
bracket scaffold which is a framed 
bracket of 2 z 4 or 2 z 3 stuff hung by 
a bolt to the sheathing with a cleat 
spanning two atuddings inside, and 
in fact any form of scaffold nailed to 
the inside or outside details of a build- 
ing, though the framed bracket is 
likewise a portable and a very handy 



This scaffold nay be constructed 
without the wttng-ht liuu tiuuk in 
the manner which is shown at the 
dotted line. B isa stout piece to fit 
over of 3 z 6 lich spruce timber 
notched out or n tiled to the bottom 
edges of two floor-beams and on each 
side of this two boards are nailed, 
being also nalledto the side of the 
plank above, thusholding it firmly in 
place. This is an exceed) ugly simple 
and strong form ol cantilever scaffold 
but not so strong or reliable as the 
hook. In closing this description I 
would state that .his form of canti- 
leveriog out for seuToIds is in daily 




Fin. 2. 



acafiold. Fl?. 1 of the illustrations 
shows a very convenient form of 
scaffold which can be adopted when 
netting cornice or doing any kind of 
work on the outside walla of a brick 
or stone building, and it is so simple 
as to be rapidly and easily put 
together. Reference to 11 ga. 1 and : . 
will aho v that it eoneiau of an ordi- 
nary 2x8, 2 z to, or j z it sound 
, spruce beam projected out through 
each window open big about half or 
one-third or Its length, with Ha bot- 
tom edge resting on the sill of the 

Is kept 



use in most of the cities above the 
first, second, and tUrd stories, espe- 
cially on the very high buildings and 
as its safety and flurrying capacity 
depend entirely on tie tensile strength 
of the bearing plant, the greatest of 
care should be taken to^only place the 
aonodest of timbers n this Impo tant 
position, lest one iiuuld happ< ■ to 
break and cause a fetrful fall. 

Self-supporting stttionary »tm(UM 
should be formed of sound 
snd diagonal bracing for uprights 1 x 
Si 3*4. 4*4. orfizfilmh a 

e 



weights to be imposed on the scaffold. 
This method I illustrate by th- en- 
graving, Fig. 3, which is a scaffold 
of 6 z 6 uprights with ^16 inch 
boards for bracing. This square scaf- 
fold is 4 feet by 4 feet on the base and 
was used for putting in terra cotta 
blocks in a church In which- there was 
afterwards placed a scaffold for palnt- 




Fiti. 3. 

ers and varnishers which covered the 
entire floor of the church and allowed 
them to decorate the ceiling 100 feet 
above. This excellent piece of work 
was built up of 3 x 3 inch by :6 feet 
long spruce timber uprights butted 
end to end vertically and cleated and 
nailed with % spruce cleats it the 
0\ 



joints. These uprights 
to r eet apart and braced as in Fig. 3 
with r z 3 spruce furring strips 16 feet 
long. This Is a good construction for 
light weights, but should not be 
trusted except for men and light ma- 
terials, nor loaded with stuff as ceil- 
ing, etc. 

The above form of scaffold may be 
used outside safely by using heavier 
timbers as 6 z 6 uprights and 1 z 6 
braces, and the writer has seen some 
splendid self-supporting scaffolds 
built thus, notably on top of church 
towers, for the purpose of repairing 
the spires above the towers Fig. 4 
will give the reader a fuller conception 
of a scaffold of this description, as I 
have made this drawing from one now 
being used on the outside of a four- 
story brick house. Uprights are 3 z 
6 and the braces and foollocks or cross 
ties 1 z 8 inch, all well nailed. The 
footlocks, if intended to cariy material, 
should have a cleat nailed under their 
bottom edges. This scaffold reaches 
up to the second story and is easily 
In connection with this im- 




portant subject I would state that for 
scaffolds where there is likely to be 
any great danger, as on heights, it is 

always wisest to obtain the timbers 
"planed," so that all large knots, 
shakes or other vital defects which are 
likely to impair the strength of the 
timber should be exposed and same 
not used. When the rough drawn 
grain is on timber It is not always 
possible to determine the direction of 
the fibrous tissue of the wood, and a 
cross grained or other faulty bearing 
piece may be used and an accident is 
liable to occur. 

In concluding this short article on 
scaffolds, I would state that it has been 
inspired by the number of sad acci- 
dents which occur almost weekly in 
our cities and towns, and it Is mourn- 
ful to think of the valuable lives 
which are lost for want of care and the 
consideration of mechanical details in 
this adjunct to building construction. 
How many lives depend on conscien- 
tious foremen ? How great Is the re- 
sponsibility and how few appreciate 
it ! Be exact and thorough men, in 
building scaffolds, for a sense of 
danger or a feeling of insecurity must 
of necessity detract from the fkil and 
product of yonr labor ; and if you fall 
who can replace your life ? 



Claim Approved la November, i&oft. 



NAVB. Umnr 
Mm. Mar? A. ftr.Bf) , , . . 1 

Hrltm achate 

Aag . GmtxUtMa . ... i 
Michael 

mi*, n*— 

CfcM. Frt*WlAi« ..... 
Mtlfh. Safctida .... 



Amt. 




JM 

Hoiliday . . . 
[ai«u<Tlte Vqgt 
Mr» Bdith Craagl* , 
Job* W. Uttnr . . 
Caleb &c*s 
Mr* Cirri* t. ue Ha 

Geo. Kock 

John Ambie'ti ...... 

Piaa* Prtedricb , . 

Wilhelm Khcaiick ... 
Joha J Ittachln ...... 

John airachtrfet ■ , : ' . .- 
Mr*. LflHtM Bt*ag*l 
lira, mm 



S7t,« 




4 



THE CARPENTER 



PHILADELPHIA, JANUARY, 1899. 




Curves, as Used by Carpenters and 
Joiners.-XV. 



make both to width. Make centre or 
plumb joint by bevel C; join both 
pieces with dowels or slip feather, as 
may be best, and ttie circular head 
will be complete. 

The Interior ribs are marked P P, 
-2, S3 ; the curves of these are struck 
with radius V, L, or 4. 5- both being 
equal. At Fig, 148, ia shown an ele- 
vation of half the number of ribs ; 
the shaded parts represent the bevel 
cuts against the front double- curved 
rib. 



ItY I REP T HODGSON. 




SHOW at Fig. 147 a P lan and 
elevation of a niche, having a 
semi-circular head and which 
stands in a concave wall. 
The front rib will require to 
have two unequal curves combined, 
the surface in front having to agree 
with the concave of the wall, while 
the under edaje must form a semi- 
circle ; in fact, this is an instance of 
double curvature, one of the most 
difficult problems that confronts the 
workman, belonging, as it does, to the 
same class of problems as the forma- 
tion of a hand-rail or wreath over a 
stair having a cylindrical well hole. 




Fig. 148. 

The method herewith presented is 
the simplest known and may be 
easily grasped by the ordinary work 
man. The front rib Is formed of two 
pieces of plank, each being thick 
enoujh to admit of being worked to 
the required curve. The surface of 
the plank is shown by the chords 4, 6 
and 4, 7, Fig. 147, and it will be ob- 
served that chord 4. 6 forms an angle 
with the line 6, 7; this shows that 
the cnrve on the surface of the plank 
should be elliptical, because, as a 
matter of fact, it is a section of a 
cylinder which has been cut by a 
plane oblique to Us base. In this 
case, the length of the lines, 6, 4 and 
6, V are so nearly equal as to allow 
of the interior cnrve being stricken 
with the radius 4, 5. and exterior with 
the radius 4.6; take any number of 
points on the latter, and from them 
draw lines parallel with 4, 5: draw 
the chord B, H and parallel to it, 
draw C, D which will give A, B, C, D 
at the form of plank for one half of 
the front rib. Joint the edgea of the 
plank, lay It on the drawing and mark 
the points B, E, F, H— these continue 
across the surface, as bevel X directs, 
also acrofls the edgea square with the 
surface ; both edges being marked by 
the curved mould C, D ; cut ofl the 
circular slab 5, H, replace it, and fast- 
en each end with a wood-screw ; now 
work out the concave with a flexible 
p'ane or other device, to the lines 
marked out on its edges. Prepare 
the other half In like manner, and 




Suppose it is required to make 
and erect a groin to stand over an 
opening having a rectangular plan, 
Blmilar to the one shown in Fig. 149. 
Make S, 2, L, Y, the ground plan. 
Draw diagonals from opposite corners 
intersecting at O. Draw on line S, 
Y, a semi circle, its radius being A, 
E, which determines the height of 
groin, then through O, draw the dotted 



Fie 147. 

line II, B, square with the line S. 2, 
also the dotted ine 1. B. cuttiiiR <>. 
in the centre, atrl parallel with S, 2. 
With O as a cente and A as radius ; 
draw quarter cirtle A, J ; make A, B. 
equal A. O ; draw semi ellipse L, B, 
Y, now draw fron O, square with the 
line 2, Y, to B'; make O, B', equal 
to 0, A ; then daw semi ellipse 2, B, 
V. The ribs of he groin are now in 




Fig. 149. 



position. To find the covering divide 
the quadrant A J, into anv number 
of equal parts, say four ; draw from 
each point, parallel with Y, I. lines 
cutting the diagonal S L, at K, N, 
C, from which draw square with V, 
L, lines cutting ellipse at K, P, R 
These are measurements on the curve; 
set off the same above the line 3 L, 
L. In this way L. K, equals I,. K on 
the curve, and K, P, cqnals K, P, on 
the curve ; again, P, K, I), equals 
corresponding letters on curve, thus 
giving points, through which draw 
parallel with a, I„ cutting Hnrs from 
quadrant A, J, and through intercep- 
tions thus made draw the curve from 
II to I, ; set otf distances on the left 
to equal those on the right, and diaw 
the curve from B to 2, which com- 
pletes the end covering. 

To find the covering of side S, 1, 
take any point, say J; set off from 
it four parts, each to equal one of 
those on quadrant A, J ; draw thtough 
each point parallel with S, 2 ; make 
C. C, equal C, C, on the right ; sgaii 
make N, N, equal N. N, on the right, 
once more make V, V, equal V, R, on 
the right ; now draw the curve from 
H, through V, N. C, W: set off dis- 
tances on the other side, and draw ■ 
similar curve to that just made, 
wh'ch completes the side covering. 

Quoting Robert Riddel 1 anent this 
problem, which he bad improved on 
somewhat from Nicholson's method; 
he says : "This problem, and its solo 
tion are important matters, and it 
should he the earnest desire of 
every mechanic employed in the build- 
ing arts to thoroughly understand 
them, for on *,heir principles 
the whole system of grolt 
tion." And, in referring 
gram, he says: "To have 
idea of it, suppose the curved Hn* 



understs 
pies dar- 
lu ccsr 

to tl 

re a cot 



THE CARPENTER. 



cut through the paper, and a cut 
made In like manner on line passing 
through J. Now the piece la loose, 
lift It, and bring the edge through J, 
on the line S. 2 ; bend the paper until 
the point II. stands over centre of 
groin O. Here the bending has 
caused curved edges of covering to 
ange with the straight lines O, 2. 
nd O, S. Then if the end covering 



the following two Illustrations and 
descriptions were embodied. As the 
methods of obtaining the two higher 
curves — ellipse and hyperbola — are 
curious and useful, I present them 
herewith, hoping their simplicity 
will commend itself to the readers 01 
Carpenter. 

Fig. 150 shows an ellipse and is 
formed by two equal series of equi- 




FlC 150. 



is cut in a similar manner, and bends 
from line 2, L, I,, until point II, stands 
over centred, then its curvtd edge* 
will be found to range with lines O, 
2, on the left and O, I„ on the right, 
so that when the curved edges on 
both pieces of covering come together 
tbey close directly over the line O, 2. 
To make the ribs for this groin, 



distant circles which are described 
around each foci, and the intersections 
of the successive rircles 1 taken in- 
creasingly) of one jet, with the suc- 
cessive circles (taken decreasing!}- > of 
the other set, give an ellipse To 
determine an ellipse having given foci 
and a given minor axis, we have only 
to take that particular ellipse of sev- 
eral given by the construction, which 
passes through the ends of the de- 




Fig 151 



we must consider that viewing it 
through its narrow ends it has the 
form of a semi circle, as seen in the 
line S, B, Y. This being the case, it 
follows that all the ribs that come on 
angles V. 0, I„ and 2. O. S. must be 

«rts of the quadrant, as shown at A, 
j Again, looking through the long 
aide, we 6nd the aTch to a semi- 
ellipse, aa shown at I„ B, Y, parts of 
which are to be cut for the angles O, 
h, 2, and O, S, Y. The short riba 
may be cut In at regular intervals, to 
their proper lengths and bevels, the 
points being nailed to the diagonal 
ribs, and the feet fastened to plate or 
other framing. If it is intended to 
lath and plaster the groin in the in- 
terior, the ribs should be placed to 16- 
inch centres, and this distance will 
■uit for the exterior board covering. 

Some years ago there appeared in 
Knowledge, an English scientific 
journal, a paper on curves, in which 



sired minor axis, or the major at is, if 
we prefer it, may be used to deter- 
mine the ellipse. Of course, it is 
quite easy to take the radii of our 
circles bo that two equal circles 
around the foci shall intersect at ex- 
tremities of any indicated minor axis, 
or, if we prefer It, two circles around 
the foci may intersect at any desired 
distance from either foci to determine 
an end of the msjor axis. After that, 
taking equal divisions along the 
major axis, produced if necessary, we 
get all other radii. 

Fig. 151 illustrates a similar method 
for drawing any desired hyperbola. I 
have, on several occasions, made use 
of these methods, and have found 
them to work out correctly, 

Fig. 152 exhibits an ornament drawn 
altogether with the compass. The 
centres are all shown and lettered for 
reference ; r being the general centre, 
while a, j, d, i, m and c show the 
divisions and radiating Lies of one- 
half of the figure. As the ct 'esmay 
all be framed at the internet ons of 
the dotted lines, further explanations 
{To to contink'd.) 




(fmterUOni under thu head colt ten cent* « lint.) 



Colummts, Ohio. 
December I, 1WW. 

WHhi EAS h It haa pleased Almighty God tn 
Ilia Infinite wisdom to remove from our midst 
our esteemed lirothtr, khii.ip K irs,h, who de- 
parted Ibia life N -vein her '.'I, IS*, and 

Wiirutu, Tali Lnioa No, 111 feels the loaaof 
a faithful Brother and earned prom-ler or 
Unionism; therefore. belt 

h'eiolwtt, That we drape our charier for thirty 
days, end the' we n press our sincere sympathy 
to the bereaved family of tux deceased Brother ; 
also be It 

KfiohH, That a copy of these resolutions be 
spresd on the minutes of our meeting and a copy 
be presented to the family, also a copy be seat to 
THK Caupkntku, our official jotrnal, for publi- 
cation, s. V. KWtNfi, 

flee. Sec. 

H. H Scott, I Committee. 

G.C Dtt'UHBXTY. j 

N JEW AR K , N. J. 

Nove -nber 13, 1898. 
Wants**, It ha* pleased the 
of the universe to remove from our 
anther Aiham Mundv, a worthy metauer of 
Union SOU, 

Reiohed, That In the death of Brother Aukam 
Mikdy we recognise the fact that no man 
knoweth when the grim reaper death will cut 
uadow , and while lamenting his I ss weten- 
der the treated jvldnw and family our sincere 
sympathy in their dark hour ; being assured 
that time will ease the aching heart; and belt 
further 

A>jo/ie,f, That our Charter be draped for thirty 
days; a copy of these resolutions sent to the 
widow and sis > published In our official organ, 

TUB CAgFKNTKR. 

Wu . M Shaw, 
Roan N. Ciiaii.. \ Committee 
W. K CiiAiiuaas, 



This Label la 
issued under 
authority of the 
Internal i o n a I 
Typovraphlca 1 
Onion and oi the (Verman Typographia. The 
label is used on all newspaper and book work. 
It always bears the name and location of where 
the printing work la done. 



CUT THIS OUT 



forth* 

Written for 



Practical Books 



HOW TO FRAME A HOUSE, 

Or Bal oon and Roof- Framing, by Owan B. Ma- 
ginnla author of" Practical Centering," "How 
to Join Mouldings." 'la,, eic. 

It !■ a practical treatise, on the latent and beat 
methods of laying out, framing and raining Um- 
ber bouaae together with an easily understood 
system of Roof Framing, the whole maklr.g a 
taAntl^i Bii^d flaWiily Applied book for r [ffl 11 t-is , 
and Journey 



EHHVI1CI 



Fosiiaov, Ohio. 
November 12, 1008. 

win khas, tl has pleased the great Architect 
and Builder of the I Diverse to remove from our 
midst our late and reapecled Brother, John 
Kaaoa ; therefore, be it 

Resolved, That in the death of John Kbaob, 
Local Inlon IU0 of Carpenters and Jo nera of 
America laments the loss ot a Brother, who was 
ever r sdy to proffer the hand or aid and the 
voice of sympathy to the needy and distressed, • 
ttlend to ua all. an upright citizen . a kind and 
loving lather. 

Re**k*d That our heartfelt sympathy be ex- 
tended to his r el stives in their affliction 

Rtuttved, That these resolution* be spread upon 
the iccotda of our Local Union, and a copy 
thereof he trsnsmittcd to the relatives of our 
deceased Urol her, and ou 
CabpsntM. 

' I BO. KlOTKK, 

K. D. Will, 
Gbuhqb Wane, 



OON f ENTtf, 
PART I.- Balloon Framing. 

I. Oanaral description of Balloon 
. .'ranted Bills and their oouai ruction. 
Chapter II First Floor Beams or Jolal*, Htory 
Beclions. Beoond Floor Beams. Bluddlug Fram- 
ing of Door and Windows Opening. Wall Plates 
i.ud Roof Timbers. 

Chapter III. Laying out and Working 
loon Frames Girders, Bills, Posts and Bit. 

Crispier IV. Laying Out First an I 
Floor Joists or Beams, Calling Joists and Wall 
Plates. 

Chapter V. Laying out and Framing the 

Bo-f. 

Chapter VI Raising 

Chapter TIL Braced Frame Houses. How to 
Lay out and Frame Them. 

Chapter VI 11. How to Frame Out Bay Win- 
dows. 

PART. II. - Roof- Framing. 

This contains seven chapters giving the sle- 

I la illustrated and explained by over 
ea, roofs, etc, and 




ALSO 



it 



ii 



This splendid book is now ready. It son tains 
97 chapters and 7» engravings and covers the 

l,ave i — 



4 practical and •'•Uy 
of laying out and framing roofs aft 
building 




6 




(Tta I * Department Is open for criticism and 
M>r respond* nee from our readers on mechanical 
mbiects in Carpentry, end Idea* as to Craft 
trganliatlon 

*V rue on one aide 01 the paper only. AH 
articles should be signed. 
Matter for thi* Department must be In this 
py the asthol the month.) 



Water Closet Fittings. 



Fiom K D , Pullman, lit 

I send by this mail for anyone who 
wants to make them for His home, 
sketches of a wash basin front and 
woodwork for a water closet seat, 
which I made in birch of scrap stuff 
which I picked up around the mill. 




Shrinkage and Warpage of Timber. 

Ktora Enquirer, Topeka, Kan : 

I trust some practical correspond- 
ent of TUV C.\kim:ntkR will send 
some data about the shrinkage and 
warpage ofthe different timbers This 
is a par* of the carpenter 's craft which 
has never yet been wtitten up I like 
the Utters from the men, but to SO* 
they seem too simple How would .1 
good, rousing criticism of the every - 
d.iy mechanic go ; or could he stand 
it.' Would he compare, think you, 
with the older mechanic who kmete 
h s business in spite of what " < tid 
Timer * or F. T Hodgson eay. Is F. 
T a modern that he so berates us, 
who took entire charge and put up 
the best existing houses in the states 
west of the Ohio, or does he ever stop 
and think of the labor and skill it 
took to do it, where there was no ma 
chinery and poor tools 



What a Voi Is. 



I framed the whole business, mortise 
and tenon, and clamped and tongued 
together the corneri. If any man 
wants it I will send you the details, 
Mr Editor. 



From J. C. H , Nyack, NY.: 

On reading Tiik Cari'i:nter, I 
think there 1b too much about framing 
published in it, and, as brick work is 
gradually pushing out the framework, 
would it not be best to post we country 
carpenters up a bit in trimming Here 
the two branches are very separate, 
and the framers are generally too 
rough in the handling to do the 
finishing up. I don 1 see why this is, 
but it is and I know it, so, Mr Editor, 
arrange for something about trimming 
inside, as casing windows, doors, and 
so forth. 



The Wrong Kind of a Dam. 



To the Editor : 

In my article on "Galvanized 
Iron" In the November Car rs nth r, 
where it speaks of the tinker's dam, it 
waa made to read more in the way of 
profanity than in the light which it 
was intended by adding "n" to the 
word dam. 

It is said that in olden times the 
tinkers used to build up with clay to 
ket p the solder from running, and this 
was called a dam, Hence the common 
saying of "not worth a tinker's dim." 

A. W. Woods. 



Fiom O D., Portland, Maine : 

In answer to the man who wants to 
know what a Dog" is, I would tell 
him that it is a piece of ' 4 or i round 
hammered iron from o to 12 inches 
long with the p tints turned t'own 
about inches, and it is used to hold 
big tittlbete logethei in trestles, dock 
work and on bridges When one point 
is driven into each piece, the two 
pieces are drawn tightly together. 

l rjin I. DeO., QoebeC, Canada: 

I am surprised that a reader of Tin: 
CARi't'NTKH should ask what a "Dog" 
is, as the tool is so common among 



F 



1 



.Sprung Stairs 



From S J J , Oswego, N Y i 

I get a great deal of information 
out of The Caki'Entkk. but very 
little about stair building, for nobody 
seems to know how to write up this 
subject, and I have a problem that 
would be worth answering if you 
think it fit to publish. It is the case of 
a handsome black walnut staircase, 
having the risers and steps spring 
out of the dadoes of the inside string 
(against the wall), so that the stairs 
creak when walked on and the plaster 
on the soffit underneath is commenc 
ing to crack and fall off in spots. I 
have tried to wedge the steps and 
treads back into the dadoes, but they 
won t go back, and as the stairs are 
getting worse something has got to 
be done, Is it possible, could any 
stair builder tell me, to get them 
together again without removing the 
plaster, and are the stairs safe on the 
carriages ? 



mechanics who work timber. I send 
a sketch of this simple tool aud hope 
he will understand it. It is dtiven in 
and pulled out with a hammer. 



Drawing Lesson. 



II V A U WOODS 



Our subject for this lesson represents 
a (light of stone steps, showing the 
plan, front and side elevations The 
dimensions are given on the plan for 
the top measurements, and on the end 
elevation for the heights. The dotted 
line* on the end elevation show the 
sectional view thrntijrli the> steps. The 
walks represent tile work. 

We recommend drawing this on a 
scale of % inch to the foot. Draw 
the plan first, then draw the front 
and side elevations in the positions 
as shown. Use a medium hard pencil 
for all line work and a Boft pencil for 
the shading 



Rules Regarding Apprentices. 



At the lleltoit Convention of Ihr frilled Rrolh- 
eihood of Carpenters end Jomets ol America, 
held Annual * 1 1 tWK UK following rules in rela- 
tion to apprentice* warn approved and the f mat 

UHlOna are urged I" k-i utf Iheir enforcement ! 

H'hKfiit, Tilt- rapid influs ol unskilled Hiirl in- 
comj.elriil men in lilt rarpmlM trad* has hud 
of late feats, a eerj depleting and injurious 
effect upon the mrihaotca in the business ami 
has m teudeucy to drgrade Hie Standard ol -mil 

and to glen no encouragement to yum men to 

hfcwaif apprentices ami to master Ihr Made 
thoroug li I v ; therelore, in the best inieieau of 
the t iHfi .wr declare eureelfe* tu favor ofthetol 
lowing tulrs : 

Suction 1 The Indenturing ol apprentices is 
tltr t>eat me.iiii calculated to give that efficiency 
wlu-h it to dvaitable a carpenter should pfassjeea), 
and also to »*ive ihr nrcrvaiv guarantee Ij the 
employeia thai snnte return will tie made to them 
for a pioi^r efluit to lum out competent work- 
men ; therefore we dirrct that all Local I'motis 
under our jurisdiction shall use every possible 
means, when err practical, lo Introduce the ivs- 
tetn ol Indenturing apprentices. 

Sue 2. Any boy or person hereafter engaging 
himself to learn the trade i I carpentry, shall be 
required to serve a tegular apprenticeship 1 1 
four consecutive yeara, and shall not he consid 
ereda journeyman unless he has complied with 
this rule, and is twenty-one yeara c I age at the 
completion of his apprenticeship 

Site. I All »*iyi entering the carpenter trade 
with the intention of learning the business shall 
be held by agreement Indenture or written con 
trait foi a term of four years. 

Sax 4 When a hoy shall have contracted with 
an employer lo serve a certain term of years, he 
•hall, on no pretense whatever, leave said em- 
ployer and contract with another, without the 
full and free consent of as id first employer, 
unlrsa there is just cause or that such change la 
made In consequence of the death ot relinquish- 
ment of busiiiraa hy the fits! employer . any ap- 
prentice so leaving sbslt not he pet milled lo 
work ut Jer the j unsd ictlon of any l.inl t*nion 
In our Brotherhood, but shall he requi red lo va- 
luta lo hia employer and serve out his appres- 



skc 6 It is saj«luf4 upvo each I «— I t'nlaai 
to make regulations limiting the number of ap- 
prentices to tie employed In each shop or mitt to 
one lot eoch number ol journeymen as may 
seem to them just; and all t'nlona are recom- 
mended to admit to membership apprentice* In 
the last year ol their apprenticeship tn Ihr end 
that, upon the eipiration of their teraaa i f ap- 
prenticeship they may become acq us In led with 
the workings of the Colon, and ha better fitted 
to appreciate lit privileges and obllfatferM upon 
assuming full me mhetibip. 



From W. H. K , Reno, Nevada t 

DkarSir: Kin 11 y inform me where 
I can obtain galvanized iron shingling 
brackets, or if there is such a thing 
made, and oblige. 

Note.— We would recommend W. 
H. K to write some of the dealers in 
our advertising columns, but publish 
his letter for all readers to answer if 
they so desire. 





5toNe: Steps. 



7 




um\\m\m\mm\mmmmmm\mmmm\ 



I 



a ■ 



I.. It, II 



FRAMING PLAN 



u 



New quarterly Password and blanks 
for the ensuing quarter were sent all 
Locals in good standing on Dec. 18th. 



Gold plated pins or badges for 
members, with emblem of the U. B., 
cost 25 cents each. They an 
and durable. 



A Platform 5talrca»«. 



HV ( HAS L. ItKRlKES. 



In many ca«es we need such an 
item as a ataircase. The above draw- 
ings represent a platform staircase 
suitable for a city house. The group 
of drawings represents an elevation 
showing and giving a description of 
the design ; next is our plan and 
framing plan giving us the numl>er of 
risers, width of stairs, etc The sec 
tion giving height of railings and 
construction of same. 

The finish of staircase is In cherry, 
while the rough framing timber is 
spruce. 

The stairs are supported by 3 x fi 
inch carriage beams framing Into a 
1 x 12 inch header at head of plat- 
forms. (See framing plan.) 

The paneling work, newels, 
columns, balusters, etc , are also 
cherry. The risers and treads are of 
white pine, Ji inch for risers and 
1 \ Inches for treads, The figures A. 
H, C, and I), are larger acale details 
of different parts of staircase. 



■ -» 1 



P 

'I 1 




The new G, E. B has been in 
sion at the general office since 
January 9th, and will have fully 
two weeks work at this meeting. 



The new Constitution went into 
effect January 1, 1899. Local Unions 
should at once send to the G S T. 
for copies, so the members can become 
familiar with the changes in our laws. 




The <",eruian and French editions 
of the new C-istitutlon will not be 
ready until some time in February 
J* 

Leimikhs, day books, etc , ruled in 
proper and convenient form, can be 
supplied Locals by addressing thia 



Six new Unions have been chartered 
recently, viz : Union ids, Lima, 
O ; 213, Hartford City, Ind ; 216, 
Torrington, Conn.; 245, Cambridge, 
O ; 261, Valdoata, Ga , and 262, Peck- 
ville. Pa, 



New Constitutions in the 
amended by the New York convention, 
and as ratified by the recent general 
vote of the members, are now ready 
this month. Send in your orders 
with cash to the G ST. through 
your F. S. Price $5.00 per hundred 



Cards of membership for i8'>9-iooo 
are now ready. Price $t.oo per hun- 
dred Send your order to the G. S.-T. 

J» 

Returns of the general vote in 
detail on the newly amended consti- 
tution wilt be found on pages io to 13 
of this month's Carpenter. 

«** 

A completely new clerical force la 
now employed In the office of the 
G S. T. Bro. T. J. Flemmlng, of 
Union ao, Camden, N, J. t is 



PLAN, 



At Kansas City, Mo., the American 
Federation of Labor hald its eight- 
eenth annual convention last month. 
General Secretary- Treasurer P. J. Mc- 
Guire, E a General President Harry 
Lloyd, Ex Secretary S J. Kent, and 
O E Woodbury represented the U. B, 



A typographical error appeared 
In the September Financial Report, 
published In the October CAinfimi, 
The total expenses for September 
should have read 15,988 37, instead of 
$5,788.37. That left the cash balance 
October r, 1898, J* 1,936. Utftead of 
$.22.13* « printed. 



8 



THE CARPENTER, 

OFFICIAL JOI RNAL OK THE 

United Brotherhood of Carpenters and 
Joiners of America. 

Published Afonthly on the Fifttenth of each month. 

AT 

144 BT, Ninth St., Phil*., P». 

p J. KcGutftB, Kditor anil Publisher. 

Entered at the Post-office ;it Philadelphia, Ta., 
a* second-class matter. 

SmscmrTioN PaRK »— Ptftj cents a year, In 
advance, postpaid. 
Address all letters ami money to 

p. j. Mcflriatt, 
Box Ml, Philadelphia^ Pa. 



PHJLA., JANUARY, 1800. 



Past, Present and Future. 

BY SAM Ei, LEFFINGWELL. 



IT is not only a right thing to 
do, but It is the religious 
duty of every member of 
a Trades Union to give 
thought and reflection upon 
his past, present and future condition. 
Taken from the rough, or raw material, 
as it were, he falls into the hands of 
safe manipulation, and by a slow but 
sure application of, say, mechanical 
process, develops Into a more finished, 
if not perfect, production of upright 
manhood. Brought from darkness 
and utter ignorance of his rights, he 
comes into the light of reason, intel- 
ligence and scrutiny, and is awakened 
with higher aspirations, brighter 
hopes and renewed zeal in the strug- 
gle allotted him for a common exist- 
ence and a betterment of the condition 
of himself and those dependent upon 
him. 

This process of development is 
necessarily slow— and should be so— 
It iB safer thus. The promise in view 
is not Utopian or chimerical ; neither 
sophistic nor fallacious. It is real, 
actual— exists in truth. It is not as 
the flash-light of a camera, to glare 
and dazzle for a moment, then dis- 
appear and leave, for despondency, the 
same darkness and gloom as before. 

Enlightenment begins with the 
very first step taken in Trades -Union- 
ism ; enlightenment of mind, instruc- 
tion in a new line of thought ; a 
clearing of intellect and conscience ; 
escaping from an isolation of ignor- 
ance and obscurity to a better knowl- 
edge of personal worth, value and 
usefulness. The selfishness of the 
Individual weakens in its attribute 
of clannishness, and gradually but 
surely wastes itself in the broader 
expanse of communal fellowship, 
friendship and fraternity. 

While the newly entered apprentice 
into the Trade Union is impressed 
with the hope of a betterment of his 
condition, in increased pay for his 
labor and fewer hours of toil, in his 
struggle for sustenance and possible 
existence, he soon learns that that is 
not all the good there is in store for 
him. Men of his own trade whom he 
knew only distantly before — men 
whose very glance had formerly 
pierced him as an arrow of frigidity 
and cheerlesao ess — now meet him and 
greet him, their faces aglow with ani- 
mation and good cheer, extending the 
hearty grasp of friendship and fellow- 



ship which infuses by its very touch 
an unmistakable fellow-feeling, a 
desire for an agreement of affections 
and inclinations, and such conformity 
of that natural temperament as will 
make two persons pleased with each 
other. 

He is somewhat puzzled in the 
beginning ; he is in doubt as to 
whether the ice will bear htm up, 
crossing a stream which has long sep- 
arated darkness from light ; but, as 
he passes over and Is landed safely on 
the other shore, he merges into the 
dawn of brighter prospects, enlight- 
ened hope, and is inspired with a 
confidence that not all the world is 
bad, and that he is himself a iactor in 
the development of a power to be con- 
ceived as determining the future of 
himself and the rest of mankind. His 
mind passes through a process of un- 
rolling or unfolding ; is awakened to 
a better understanding of his own in- 
dividual worth and an enlightened 
appreciation of the power for good 
that lies within himself, if he will 
but utilize the opportunities assured 
him by the co-operation of firm hands 
and willing hearts, to act jointly in a 
life struggle for an amelioration of 
conditions which have been burden- 
some, if not unjust and tyrannical. 

This is the history of thousands 
who have been brought within the 
fold of pure Trade Unionism ; but it is 
not alone with them that it is intended 
to deal in the humble pretensions of 
this unassuming homily. It is to 
the more experienced, better drilled, 
better informed soldier in the ranks 
of Unionism. 

What of your past ? Do you ever 
think of it ? Have yon any remem- 
brance of a past that was bitter, hope- 
less, remorseless ? Have your condi- 
tions been improved ? How have they 
been made better? Do yom get 
any better pay now than you did 
before you joined with the fellows of 
your trade or calling to secure It ? Do 
you toll as many long hours as you 
were foiled to do before you found 
assistance to lift the embargo which 
bore such heavy weight upon your lib- 
erty of life and the pursuit of common 
domestic happiness ? Are you not im- 
proved in health and strength to 
battle for the means of support for 
yourself and those dependent upon 
you ? Are you not better equipped 
to avail yourself of the opportunities 
offered for an improvement of your 
own mind ; for more of leisure, rest 
and contentment for the worn-out 
wife at the humble, holy shrine of 
your domestic felicity ; for the better 
education, enlightenment and happi- 
ness of your children ? Have you not 
improved in your conception of re- 
sponsibility and respectability, and 
feel newly clad with armor for a de- 
fense and maintenance of the same I 
"There is something more than 
natural in this if philosophy could 
find It out." What has caused the 
change ? Do yon ever give it thought? 
It is not worthy only of reflection but 
of new resolves and determinations. 
The Trade Union in your case has 
been not only one of compensation ; it 
has been one of preservation from 
danger, if not calamity— one of abso- 
lute salvation from the ills which have 
ever afflicted mankind in helpless 
condition. Do yon fully comprehend 



all that is possible If you are o ly 
true to yourself ? But to be true to 
one s self is not alone to look out for 
the interest of self. " There are oth- 
ers " You are not alone in the respon- 
sibility for the privileges and emolu- 
ments you enjoy. By helping others 
you but add to the safety and security 
of your own belongings. Stand by 
your fellows. Be constant and vigi- 
lant. Do not console yourself in quiet 
complacency that all Is secure because 
of your own better contented condi- 
tions. Stretch out your hands for the 
rescue and liberation of the unre- 
deemed. Use your endeavors to polish 
up the rough ashlars scattered In your 
pathway as a hindrance to your own 
progress and prosperity in the march 
of advance to brighter, happier days, 
when the world shall have been made 
better ; when comfort, good cheer and 
consolation shall accompany felicita 
tions and congratulations upon the 
reward sure to follow faithful perform- 
ance of duty, fidelity to trust imposed, 
in a full fruition of appeasement, con- 
tentment, happiness, secured In the 
bonds of fellowship, friendship and 
fraternity. 

Believe me, my dear brother trade 
unionist, your work Is not done be- 
cause you are safe within the fold. 
Every member of a trade organization 
should be on constant alert to improve 
and strengthen the spirit of his con- 
victions. Paying dues and attending 
only occasionally upon the meetings of 
a Union may possibly satisfy the let- 
ter of the law. The writer has been 
doing better than that for nearly 
forty-nine years, and has never made 
a step to regret. His devotions have 
always been devout, rigid, exact— 
with religions faithfulness. He has 
never lost sight of the favors con- 
ferred or the value of genuine benefi- 
cence enjoyed. The man who forgets 
the advantages obtained from his 
Trade Union connections is unworthy 
of kind consideration and respectful 
recognition. Let no msn professing 
Trade Union principles suffer himself 
—or others, if he can prevent them— 
to droop into pessimism and gloomy 
despondency. There be those who 
grumble about the amount of dues 
imposed, or of an occasional assess- 
ment Out upon auch lack of faith 
in achievement made and yet in store 
for the faithful to their calling. Take 
out your pencil and figure out your 
dues for a whole year ; then figure 
out yonr increased pay obtained 
through Trade Union methods j de- 
duct the lowest figures from the 
highest ; then look at yourself, as 
In a mirror, and strive to conceal the 
shame which a conscientious consid- 
eration would csuse to bear heavily 
upon your action. 

There is no investment on earth for 
a worklngman to make that will pay 
as much per cent, as a Trade Union. 
He makes no sacrifice of principle, 
belief or opinion, it interferes neither 
with his politics, religion or social 
functions. He can be a Trade Union- 
ist and anything else he pleases that 
may befit an honest, upright citizen, 
while the benefits are enhanced by 
each succeeding hour of toll, and he 
is braced in adherence to a rectitude 
which leaves no trace of blush or 
shame. 

Long live the Trade Union ! 



American Federation of L-abor. 



II. 

INTKRNAl, POLIO — HKI.ATION TO 
OTIIKK OKOANI/ATIONS. 



BY MORTON A. ALDB1CH, Pit, l>. 

The objects of the American Feder- 
ation of Labor are stated in its Const i 
tution as follows ; 

1. The object* of llt'» I'cderali'.n itmll Hie 

encouragement ami formation of locni Ttadt 

and l.ahur l'nlonn, uml the c!o»er federation ol 
Mich *ocietie» tti rough the orgaui/Mi"ii Cen . 
Itsl Trade and Labor fmotii in urn tad 
the further combination of >mli tx*li»» int>. 
stale. Territorial or Provincial m gan n.il lona, to 
secure legislation 111 the iiileienl «it the working 

Btaaata. 

J. The > »tahlt»hment of National anil luler 
natiou.il Trade BSfe tt, hattd ui«jn a »lr»t re 
cognition of the autonomy ol earn trade mid the 
promotion and advancement ol such bodiea 

- An American federal ton ol all National 
and International Tiade UslaM loaidand aaaiat 
etch other, to aid «nd encourage the »alr of 
loion label good* uml to ttri ur e national tegitla 
lion 111 the interval of the working p.op.e and 
influence public op u ion. by peacehu and legal 
method*, in fa»or i f orgam/,d In" 01 

I, To aid and encourage the labor pte»i -A 
America. 

Its policy Is thus two- fold. Besides 
what may be called the external policy, 
such as the promotion of legislation 
and the encouragement of the sale of 
Union label goods, the Federation 
seeks to bring about by means of 
closer federation more efficient organ- 
ization of the American Trade Union 
movement This work within the 
Trade Union world, though less con- 
spicuous than the external activity of 
the Federation, and on that account 
generally ignored, deserves careful 
consideration. 

Organizers of the Federation over 
three hundred in all— work to bring 
the Unions of a trade together in 
a national Union, and especially to 
organize new local Unions. These 
organizers receive no pay, except neces- 
sary expenses. 01 late they have 
been devoting especial attention to 
the difficult problem of organizing 
unskilled laborers. 

The Federation Is the medium 
through which the more experienced 
Trade Unionists give wholesome ad- 
vice to the cruder and less efficient 
Unions. Year after year President 
Gompers, in his annual reports, has 
urged the Unions to strengthen their 
Organization by charging high dues 
and adopting a system of Insurance 
benefits, A well filled treasury, he 
points out, is one of a Trade Union 's 
most potent arguments against an un- 
willing employer ; the benefit funds 
for sick, funeral, disability and out- 
of-work benefits enable a Trade Union 
to do more for its members ; and 
above all the existence of benefit 
funds secures a permanency in the 
membership of the Trade Union, It 
was the Unions without funds which 
broke up during the depression of 
1893, while the only national Trade 
Union affiliated with the Federation 
which had a continuous growth in 
membership during this same period 
was the one which had the system of 
high dues and benefits generally es- 
tablished. Further, only those Unions 
which maintain their membership 
intact during dull periods of industry 
are prepared to take advantage of the 
first sign of returning good times. 
This attitude of President Gompers is 
heartily endorsed by the conventions 



General Officers 

<>!' TlfK 

United Brotherhood of Carpenters and 
Joiners of America. 

Office of the Qeoeral Secretary, 
134 N. Ninth 3t , Philadelphia, Pa. 



Genera' President John William-, Inca, 
N V 

firnriil S». rfl»Tv TrMMiffr -1- J. MiU'imk, 
P. »l. Boi Philadelphia, Ps 



GkmilU \i Vti i I - i.m:.».nts. 

Pint vuf-pir.idnii w. n Ifabw.OtWmHy 

Vonkrrt, N. V. 

Second Vlce-Prraldrrt Wlltam lilurr 2' 10 
W Polk »t .Chicago. III. 

Bl NH ■ a i . I xi DT4VI Dn4Ufc 

(All correspondence f r the G K, 11 uiusl 1* 
mailed to the (',fnrnl s«rn«iy [tr«»uin | 

James M l4n' M \V Ittth »« . Srw Vork. SI V 
J. H Miller. I W Wa. hi "glint sve M.[.o,n>Mo. 

A C. dHOMU mi:: w Ml i.t . si. p.Chicsgo. 
Fred. C VVal/ I *B Htoa-1 »1 . Hjrtfor.l,C .on. 
w J. wi:ii«m« 170 Milt* «l Miatita.i.a 



American Federation of Labor. 

(Continued ) 



of the Federation the convention of 
i8(/i resolved that no local Union 
should be permitted to remain affili- 
ated with the Federation unless its 
dues were at least fifty cents a month. 
Not many years ago such a proposal 
would have met with strong opposi. 
tion. but now most I'nmns have come 
to appreciate the advantages of sub- 
stantial regular dues. 

The great la k of unity in the 
American Tra-ie t'n'on movement has 
often resulted in the existence of rival 
Trade I'nions in the same trade. The 
division in authority resulting from 
this dual organization is uniformly 
bad. The employer has to deal with 
two acta of Trade I rnon officials in- 
stead of one . and. aa a rule, the two 
organizations have ended in giving 
much more energy to fighting each 
other than to advancing the interests 
of their meruit ts. The American 
Federation has taken a firm stand 
against this needless dual organiza- 
tion. It invariably refuses to recog- 
nize more than one national organiza- 
tion in a single trade*, and it under- 
takes to protect the organization which 
it recognizes against both rivala and 
seceders. 

It remains to consider the relation 
of the American Federation of Labor 
to the rival labor organization of the 
Knights of Labor, which had existed 
aince i8<j<>. The Federation and the 
Knights both included workmen of 
various trades, but they differed radi- 
cally in their forms of organization. 
While the Knights admitted any one 
to membership (except the three ostra- 



*Th« . .»e of I ha American brancuea of the 
(English) Ama gamated Society of Carpenter* 
and Joiner* i. an inception. They were ad- 
mitted into the American federation of Labor 
by consent of the American Society, the United 



THE CARPENTER. — » 



cized classes of lawyers, bankers and 
saloonkeepers), the Federation closely 
confined its membership to working- 
men. The organization of the Ktrghts 
rested on lodges founded by the cen- 
tral order, and power was strongly 
centralized. The units of the Ameri- 
can Federation of Labor were strong, 
independent national Unions. The 
fundamental dlfier nee between the 
two bodies, however, lay in the com- 
position of the local units. The 
Knights tried to a considerable extent 
to organize in the same local assem- 
blies all classes of workmen regardless 
of vocation. The local Unions repre- 
sented in the Federation, on the con- 
trary, comprise only workmen of a 
single trade (with the unimportant 
exception of the federal Uniors ), 
The Federation deems it a mistake to 
invest authority over the affairs of a 
trade in a Union in which other 
trades are represented, and asserts the 
principle that the workmen of a craft 
alone have the right to regulate the 
affairs of that craft. 

When the Federation was first 
founded, the two organizations ap- 
parently intended to live harmoni- 
ously together. At the Federation 
convention of iSSi nearly half the 
delegates represented local assemblies 
of the Knights of Labor. Trouble 
soon arose, however, from the rivalry 
between the organizations of the 
Knights and the Federation among 
workmen in the same trade. The 
unions of the Knights provoked great 
bitterness of feeling by accepting 
workmen as members whom the Trade 
I'nions had devlarctl " unfair. " In 
some cases, when a Trade Union went 
on strike, the Knights went so far as 
to organize the workmen who took 
their places into one of their local 
assemblies. The resulting differences 
developed into an ugly fight. Several 
conferences between the two organi- 
zations utterly failed to bring about 
an agreement. The Federation de- 
manded that the Knights of Labor 
should surrender ali their authority 
in Trade Union affairs, which had 
become their chief concern, and con- 
fine themselves to the educational 
branch of their work. The struggle 
has continued intermittently ever 
since. In several instances the rival 
local organizations in the same trade 
have fought each other till they for- 
got their trade 'nterests, greatly to 
the convenience of the employers. 
For a time both organizations suf- 
fered ; but as the final result the 
American Federation of Labor has 
Bteadily grown, while the membership 
of the Knights of Labor, owing both 
to its political intrigues and to the 
Imperfect basis of its trade organiza- 
tion, has dwindled until to day the 
order is not strong enough except in 
a few localities to be a serious rival 
to the Federation. 

The conflict was a struggle for 
supremacy, of course, but deeper than 
that it was a conflict between the dif- 
ferent principles of organization 
underlying the two orders. Under 
the Knights of Labor, the policy of 
the workmen in a trade might be 
fixed, in part at least, by men out- 
side the trade. The American Feder- 
ation of Labor, supported by the 
national Trade Unions, gained a 
victory for the principle that the 



members of a t 
divided authori 
that trade. 




y 



have un 
affairs of 




OHM $$$ 



FOR TAX, PINS AND BOPPUES. 
During the month ending November 30, 18B8. 
Whenever any erron appear notify the G. S.-T. 
without delay. 



J 
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186 7 00 3'Hi 7 IH 703-— 3 K0 

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10 757 4 60 



Total Jii.383 S6 



RECHIPTS, OCTOBKR, l*0s. 

From the UuioDi, Us, etc 

Advertlaera 

■" Subacribera 

** Kent . . « , ..... ■ i 



DKTAII.KD KXPENSBS, 

Printing 1 Coil poslalK ^ 

*• 3,0o0 envelope- aa4t 
ter heads for General Of 

G. K. B , 

Printing t,2S0 large vote ret 
" 1 .250 circulars, (our 
" 64Xi request drculara 
1,000 -tamped enTel 
800 gummed n1ip» . 
6.000 letter heads , . 
lltouocopieaOctobe: 

tm • . . 

600 uoie sheet circi.la»^ . \ 
5,0UO membership carfa, . ^ 
One-half ream large vrrappiaf paper 




Postage on October Carpbiot* . 
Engravings for October " 
Special writers for •' " , 

A W. Woods 

D. tm sioddard 

10 telegrams 

Esprctsage on supplies, etc , . . 

Poatage ^ 

500 pontala 

Kegislered letters 

Postage on general vote circ 
l,Oou stampc it envelopes . . 

6U0 poatala 

Office rent for October . . 
Quarterly P. O. box rent . . 
Salary and clerk hire . 
Tax to A. P. of L. tor SeptembanKJ. 
P. J. Lambert, attorney ... 
Amalgamated Carpenters, for 
Monro ........... 

H. M, Sana era, investigation at 
claim ........ 

A, c. Cattermu l .... 

P. J. ktcGulre, traveling ex 
Kubber seals and datera . 
3,000 cUfip envelopes 

transfer casei 



Incidents'* 

Janitor's services 

D. C. of Newark, N. J. . . . 

D. C. Pittsburg 

D. C. Of Bar Francisco 

. 4,2!i3 to 4,343 . 

Total ■•«•-< 




RECBIPT3, NOVEMBER, 1 
From the Onions, tax, elc. .... 

" AdTertisera . 

" Rent 

Subscribers *, 

" Miscellaneous > 

Cash balance, November 1, 16118 . . 




Total 



Total 



1, 1898 



Miscellaneous 



Total 



Total expenses , 



DETAILED EXPENSES, N 

Pr nllng 5,0t0 appllcstion* . . 

1,000 letter sheets . . . 
" 6 000 si i ears notices . 
" 200 arreara, German 
1,000 note circulars . . 
1,000 receipt forms , . 
" 1,000 ' ill beads .... 

'• 2,(MJ0 rreas. blanka . . 

1,500 noteheada . , . 
" 1,000 clearances .... 

3,000 P. K. blanks. . . 
" 10.000 label* . ..... 

" l.OtXtcfficers' bonds . 
" 100 R. a. order books 

1. 000 poatala 

» 15 ledf-rs (2i«j pages 1 . . I ^1 

15 " t;wo pagea) . 
" 16.750 copies, November C4*» 

Bxpreasage m il9 

— Print bill 

postage on Norember t a»p«nt: 
Printing proceeding! of New 

convention 4 

Eniravings for November Car 
Special wrltcra for '' 
Prc>a Clipping Bureau . 
Nine telegram a 

Expreaaage on supplies, etc . .' . t 
Postage - ■ ■ » 4B,. 

Postage on Convention Procetdisnata* 

I^ocals +m 

p- 700 WTCiooO Postal* 

16B IK * Office rent for November . . . 

-1 00 Salary and clerk hire 

10 00 Gaa bill for quarter ..».*. 
4 20 Tax to A. F. of L, for October 
« Ttt aoo Brolherhood pini ... 
, 21,U3«100 P J.McGuire^travelting^ 

. 4tt».H!« 34 Janitor** services J 

. 8,768 20 Benefits, N os. l:H4 to 43T7 . . . |i 



Hi 



Caad balance, November 1, 18H8 . . . . f20, 1 34 Or, 



Total * I 



THE CARPENTER. 



no**. 



AMENDMENTS. 



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♦ r 



for a Stable. 



HY a. w. WOODS. 

Here is a conveniently arranged 
plan for a stable, suitable for city or 
suburban purposes. It contains two 
stalls and large carriage room, with 
hay loft and feed bins on second floor 



with easy access to same. The bins 
are so arranged that the feed can be 
drawn from them on first tloor. Just 
enough ornamentation is used to ^ive 
the building a pleasing and substan- 
tial appearance. The cost with good 
material throughout would be in the 
neighborhood of based on the 

prices prevailing in this section^of 
the country. 




-2 6-* 7*0'- - — -26-+ 14 0': 

. a6' o- 




THE CARPENTER. 



15 



J»r Q*' §*rm*n gtaderg. 

1 r uiabff Mrnb It} ..Karpfnlft " 




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tin} '« l»»:silii •> Ml "mi 
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ISitf 4tu|in £it tt i ^ imtin 'Jnj 

C Rim|t<MM< iri» Aiu! :'.iiii» : i:ui 
: ** «th ki [tftai mi ^«;t 

7 im fi Jnflf rri,<n tin v ti iltci 

. :it t-i \V". pi »utt tu ftil; 

in n» 9qn^>t w i *<!'<"' 

;m forte IK.'. 1 1 f. «, i ". 

ns«f mi "f' 'tin 1 : tttt>rii«, 
»»t i ninitiii.iti ■ " • I (trwnll ' 

i m: »t "cm t « > .(!■■• Utu, 

t 'cl <l !. 't.ltt Ullt Will, 
i: : :: ti .:■> ill iJr'ti • - tt nic 
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l|t| I irwn ^imjttti nci.i il»rt» 

, ■■ ti ! i : ".im i 'i' Sum 

; if ih i 1 1 m... n nit U'lm iVt;!c 
.«.. ' rti » f ■ • i't i «i t; 



Sum ,\fliurll*U(| 

J>i« .-ittt ,,)»il<Sen irod ^afjrtn" b« con 
aatn Solfcrn «««*urt reitb, flimmt ou* \tbtn 
benrenben JRenf*m ftmlit^ unb itsitiflt iftn 
|u «ntm Jtiiifblitf nuf ba« i^ttbenbt 3ob,r f 
in bit B«flawflfnb>U, \w » n « m •wWW 
in bo« inbrc^enb* ^aftr, m bit ,lutunft. 

X« ker „&»rvntei" "tit bidet Summer 
bic|i» 3ai)t obf^Iuit, to ifi rt polbmtnbia 
baft au4 oit «intn 8lt<f ttuf bal otra*nfienf 
unb ba« lutanflijjf toetUn, benn bet 
„<Iarptnttt" ift m4t line geituna im «!• 
nji^nH^tn Sinm, jonbttn it ift ba«aeiptBi 
«anb unlitft WHlbetftftatt, tintt Ctaoni' 
tatton btten Stbentswetf el ift bit moletiiOe 
unfc geifltgt iiaae tfctet Witflltebet ju eet- 
lefTtm. 

J>U1et 3»i<f (*nn obit nut benn trtiitfct 
mttbtn toenn bit «to|i i'tafji unlettt Wit. 
(t lie bit in emftet JBeifi ttbet i*t« aaai naa>> 
benft. B«iu*en Bit alio, bie Gteiflnifle bii 
oitganaenen 3a6te* in !ut|in H«fl«n 
unlittm ffliifle tmui i>a((lien ju laffm unV 
akiititttia cincn 8ltit in bie 3ufunft iu 
Hun. 

Dai 3aK an biflen (Snbe ait ftiften, tuat 
dctwu »ii bal ootaufaeaangene far unl, ein 
3a«t btl Minatnl unb bei fleibenl. 

3)al (Stlpenft bet Jlr&iiUloftatttt rott*(0 
in ben 3tri««n bit Catpintit nun !*on 3abte 
[«ng tjerumtDanbert, mao^te r»4 *«n tetfloffi' 
nen 3ai)te in faft noa) ^t)«em »a*e aeltenb, 
all nte im t>otb.et|e^enben. 

nnauftjaltlam 1«Iii4t bet fflolf ftunaet 
urn unfete ©titttn, unb b;iet, bott, fafl bet 
ben metfttn unfitei CoBeain ftnbet it jeit< 
tuillil Ctngano t— Ctbarmunflllol boftttfl<$ 
bte ea)taubc bcr tapttaUfHf4<n %u«beutuna 
in nnfet g lei 14, bie ftnoiften - 
wnb bal Statl aulptcfftnb. 



in«i i't oon unietit "roani'ation «Del 
oe'a>e^ n um benffiQrgtHflfl bil aibeitenben 
■olfM ben HapitaligmuS - in giiDiffm 
24tanf<n ,u bal ten ; biet unb ba stiffen 
eine flnialjt (SoOtflin |U bit lebten SSaffe — 
(um Strife. 

Slllein, la lanoe tS nodft eine tirofji Snsalil 
SoUiflen flitbt, btl fic§ unfitet Ciflanifation 
niilit anl^Iitfjfti, bie, obgleia) fie bie gliiflen 
^nteteffen tjabm mie roir organiflrten 5at< 
pentet, \u jebem ^teife arteiten unb ftatt 8 
ober 9 Stunten 10 unb 12 Stunben aibeiten, 
folange roirben toir in unletim Beftteben 
na^ matetieUet BeffetfteHunfi bem feufel in 
bit $a&t| flliit6,in, bet Dtrluc^ti, bit 5t6fd)e 
au« einim SJeibit iu roerfen . gmau \o oiel 
nit tt hmou<>.T>Qif fptangen aua) rsiebet Ijiih 
tin. Xas reus run auf bem eincn $la|e tt* 
tinfltn roitb un* an anbtttt SteUe roiibet 
oenommen ! 

(?enommtn, von mem ? Slid) t ton unfiten 
auibiuitrn, bin Rapitaltflen — obgleidj el 
bitten |u r-tutt fommt — nein, el nitb unl 
q eno mm en oon unfeten eigenen ^adjcollcgen, 
bie in ftolae itjtec geifiigen XtSgbeit ober 
au« fa[1a)ottftanbentm gntettffe, ftatt mit 
unl, roibit unl Hmpltn. 

Xal ift bit Cur He unfetet 0&nmad)t, bie, 
romn totr aUe nut tt etnftlid) toollen, set. 
fiegen roitb. 

lie Sonotntion unfetet Btabetld)aft bie 
im listen Cuattate bitftl 3abtet in 9»ero 
J)ozt tagte, bat aufcet anbeten beteitl Be. 
(djlfifle gefa^t „Bttgroierung bel ,Garpen» 
tit' unb entigifaV Igitation jut Suf diitung 
unb C tganiftrung unleret ttottegen." Die, 
rornn tia>tig butflgefflrjrt unb son unl atten 
untittVu|t, unl bem 3iile nabet btingen 
toitben. 

©enau rote bal oetfloffeni 3at>r enbet fo 
biginnt au4 bal mue fflt unl, unb oon unl 
lilbft &4ngt el bobit ab, ob toir in gltid)cr 
9Btt(e roit bit hutjeten >" unknm 

Cltnb fottliben itLillen, obet ben IRut^ f}«&en 
gegen unfitt luobeuter aufgutteten. BJ.'nn 
nio>( aBf Iln)*i4«n ttu^#n, (o vitb unt bas 
fommenbe 3oi>e mtl)t Hiimpfe btingen roie 
bal oitflofftne. 

X)it (bitft bit Un|uftieben|tit britt^t fift) in 
unfettn 9ttib>n immet tceitet Bab.n. Tiet 
Drud bit auf unl tafttt ifi f fit unl unerttag . 
lid) genorbrn unb nit otganiRttin garpem 
tit baben ben Smft bet Sage etfannt unb 
finb btttit jebel Dofet |u bringen, benn §u 
ottlteten babtn nit nitbtl fonbetn nut }u 
grntnnen. 

Unb batum, ttolligen! mit ftif*em, fto&em 
5)utbi matfdiren nit inl neui 3abt bmetn, 
if lb ft nenn tl unl tjdtttfi Rampfe btingen 
roitb mil bal oerfloffene j bal Benu&tfein 
bai nit fQr unfit Wenfdjenred)t flteiten, bal 
BtnmfeHcin baft nit bal ajoMetfltben-nicbt 
nut fflt unl — fonbetn fftt afie Wenfdjen er» 
ftreben, gtibt unl Rtaft in unferem itampfe 
auHu barren. 

Dtganifation! Stnigtttt! 
Cpfermutft! U n b ker 6ie a lann 
unl ntd)t ftt) ten — bil bie Hetttn 
btrVtbtit gebrotfeen finb, unb 
bet alutfttc&cn « e n i d) b e 1 1 bal 
Xteiaeflitn bet Steibeit, •leidji 
fett unb aiflbettttbleit latfit- 

Framlnjt. 



,,U OWRN II MAC. INN IS. 







To cut jack ; if you wish them 16 
Inches apart, slide the square up to t6 
inches, if 20 inches, slide up to 20 
inches and so on. 



study tn 



ones and so on, or divide the common 
rafter into the number of jacks 
required and get your lengths from 
common rafter : 



Fir.. 1. 

The rise and run cut on rise gives 
top cut and all plumb cuts, the run 
gives cut on plate and all level cuts. 

The side cut of jacks to fit hip. and 
valley to fit ridge, etc, is length of 
rafter and run, cut on length 

These general rules apply to all 
roofs and it is roof framing in a " nut- 
shell," although it may not be new, 
original or the best. 

Hut a better way yet Is to take rise 
and run, measure across and get length 
of rafter, this gives, length of all 
rafters for even or uneven pitches, and 
all main cuts. 



Wl'.N B. MAG1NNIS ofTers 
a prize for the most origi- 
nal, latest and best method 
of framing. Now I have 
given some thought and 
roof framing and have con- 
cluded the square is master of the 
situation, as it is much quicker and 
less liable to mistake than any method 
1 know (if. 

Take the number * hes the roof 
is to rise to the foot 1 the tongue 
and one foot on the blade (which is 
the rise and run of one foot). If the 
building is 1 l feet wide at a 7 »oot 
run apply seven times as illustrated 
(Fig 1) To cut octagon rafter apply 
game as common except rise 15 Inches 
in place of 12 Inches on blade. Hip 
or valley use 1 7 Inches. 




fiG. 1. 

To illustrate this I will take a little 
24 foot cottage, % pitch hip roof, 4 
feet deck and gable in front, see cut 

(Fig 3>< 

As it is only the principle involved 
for convenience in illustrating, I will 
use even feet as much as possible, and 
not give accurate measurements as 
to Inches, although in real framing 
accurate measurements should always 
be made. 





Fig, 4. 





As the length of common rafter is 
12 feet and run 10 feet, place the 
square on 12 and 10, cut on 12 for 
bevel of jack rafter (Fig, 7). 

Now as the front gable is to show 
tVie roof, divide into about three equal 
parts, allowing for projections; set the 
foot of valley 4 feet 6 inches from 
centre of building, as it runs back 
10 feet to deck. 

CUT of 
>Jf\CK 



FlO. 3. 

1 j pitch roof rises 8 inches to the 
foot As this 24 foot house has a 4 
foot deck, the run ot common rafter 
would be 10 feet, as the rise Is 6 feet 
s inches and run 10 feet, the length of 
conmon rafter is 1 1 feet (Fig 3). 

As the run of the hip is the diago- 
nal of 10 feet or 14 feet (Fig. 4), aad 
the rise is 6 feet S inches, run 14 feet, 
length of hip 15 feet 6 inches (Fig sj. 




Fir,. 8. 

The run of vallev is 1 j feet (Fig. 8); 
as the rise Is 6 feet S inches, run 1 1 
feet, length of valley rafter, 13 feet 

(Fig 9). 

As the rise of front gable is 6 feet 
8 inches and run 4 feet 6 inches, 
length of gable rafter 8 feet (Fig. 10). 

rl 



Fnv. 5. 

If the jacks are to be 16 Inches 
apart, measure across your square at 
16 inches at ,!., pitch and you have 19 
inches (Fig. 6) length of short jack, 
twice that length is length of 



Cur«*6*8i.t 
Jack 



Fa;. 12, 

As the length of common rafter on 
main roof is 1 2 feet, and run of gable 
4 feet 6 Inches, place the squaw on 
length, and run cut on length ana it 
gives side cut of main fack to fit 
valley il ig it) 

As the gable rafter is i* feet and run 
of main roof 10 feet, length and run 
cut on length gives side cut of gable 
jack (Fig 12). 

D. L Stoi dabl.. 




10 



THE CARPENTER. 





Agents 



Tilt CARITNTIiR. 



ALABAMA. 

S'." MoniLE-n. French. 601 Charleston «t. 

92. " (Col.) W. i'.. Lewis, T.'il St. Louis it. 

ARKANSAS. 

218 Favrttevili.k— M. P. Cu nolo g^ 1 * m 
66. Ft. Smith-H. G. Reed 

CALIFORNIA. 

194. ALAMEDA -J. Tait, IMi Park aVC 

3.12. Los ANiiKi-ttS— S, Gray, Box 221. 

36. Oakland— F. J, Anderson, 876 fit hat, 
395 Kivkrsidk— Chas. Hamilton. 277 .'>th at. 

San Francisco— Secretary of Dist Council, 
Win. J. Kidd. AM 3d st. 

22, N. L>. Wandell, I !•'«', Mission St., Sta. B. 

95. (Latin) L. Masarie. 4iH Erie st. 
304. (Ger.) Wm. Jllge, 406 Ellsworth St. 
m. Guy Lethrop, 91554 Market st. 
3Ltt. San Josr-W. J. Wilcox. 538 W. Julian st, 

33. San Rafael— I. J. Sheils, Bo* 1«. 

CANADA. 

14. Brantford-I. W. Taylor, 15S Terrace Hill. 
Si. Halifax. N. S.— A North up, ;«> Kdward st. 

15. Hamilton— W. J. Fnd, 28 Melsou st. 

1<J4. Montreal — -(Fr.) E. Frechette. Ban- 
gui net. 

376. " Allan Ramsay. 1.17 Ques net at 

255. R.*t Portagb, Ont.- John Nordland. Box 

m. 

:W, St. Catherines — James Carly. Box 193. 
27. Toronto — D. D McNeill, 2K8 Hamburg ave. 
617. Vancouver, B. C— L. G, Dordge, 7th are., 
Paii-view. 

343. WiNNiPHQ, Man -R. Bell, "(J SchulU st. 

COLORADO. 

264. Boulder — R. D. Vernon. 
615. Colo. Springs— Frank Sawyer, Elk Hotel. 
Cripple Creek— Sec. of D C, P.N, McFhee, 
Box 474. 

547. Cripple Creek— Will. Smith. 5«» K. Myers. 
45. Denver— L. B. Reeder. 1332 California st. 
1544 El Dora — L. W. Newton. 
17h, Independence— T. W. Reid, Macon, P. O. 
Box 5. 

833. Lkadvillk— W. C. Scouller, 130 W. 6 st. 

234. Ouray— John Kirby. 

564. VlCTOR-C E. Palmer. Box 384. 

CONNECTICUT. 

115. Bridgeport— J, C. Booth, 770 Norman at. 
127. Derby— Geo. H. Lampert, 3u Bank at. 

43. HARTFORD— Alex. McKay, 57 Wooalerst. 

97. New Britain— A. L. Johnson, 114 Franklin. 

79. New Haven— Wm. Wilson, 60S Chapel st. 
133. New London -A G. Keenev. I W. Coit st. 
137, Norwich— P. S Edmonds, 2!»3 Central ave. 
746. Nor walk— William A. Kellong, Box 361. 
210. Stamford — R. B. McMillin, 176 Pacific st. 
216. Tobrinoton-L. Hotchkisa, 2> George st. 
260. Wat be bury— Jos. E- San di ford, 27 N. Vine. 

DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA. 

190. Washington— L. P. Burner, llifi Q 
N, W. 

FLORIDA. 



INDIAN TERRITORY. 

162 MfSKoilKK-J P. lUisnirr 

IOWA. 

ttft nnoNK-c. l. McKttoj . 

At I. Bi HLisiiTUN I nackman.HV'S Centrals*. 
551, Iiavkmmki-w. c. Meyers, 132 Bnuhrst. 
Its*. Dks Mmxi'«-r. s. <".. Bntljtley, I uu jlst st. 
<>7v lu iii-vi M R. Hogan, SW'Tth at. 
7«7. OrrvatWA— J.W.Morrl««>«, no s j. ffetxentt 

KANSAS. 

107. Kansas CITY— A. D, Gates. 816 I'nckard *t. 
ISO. " o. B Poller, a« Lafayette live. 
4!>!i. Lkavrnworth- J SchaufleT.Mooteautna av 
IK Tor ek a— A. M. n Ctattdy.WTytet at 

KENTUCKY. 

712. Covinkton-C Glattine. 1582 Kavanaugh -1 
7s.Y " (Tier.) B. Kampsen, 262 W. nth *t 
412. Hopkixsvih.k— vY O Hall 
lit). i.oi tsviu.K-11 S. Huffman 1787 Gallagher. 
21 1 - (Ger.) J. Schneider. 1 186 K. Jacob av. 
t» Ni wpokt-W. E. Wing, 022 Central ave 

LOUISIANA. 

New Orleans— Secretary of Dist. Council 
F. G. Wetter. 2220 Josephine st. 
76. D. C. Kesler, 2MS Constance si. 
704. P. Duhrkop, M7 Cadii St. 
736. M, foaquin, l;«M St, Roche ave. 



Il-i 

:tihi 
721 
:tl ) 
mil 
I l » 
<i. 
:t»t 
1 -.. 

SI 
M2 



St., 



224. Jacksonville- (Col.) J. A. Sampson, 28 W. 

Union st. 

605. " P. E. Houghton . 617 K. Church st. 

74. FknsaCOLa— J. A. Lyle. 317 . W. Zawagoasa 
696. Taupa-C. B, Hester, 2407 Tampa st. 

GEORGIA. 

438. Atlanta-T. H. Miller, 16 Vennble st. 
136 Aogl*sta-(Co1> T. P. Lewis, 1:108 Philip at, 
144. Macon — G. S. Bolton, 520 Elm st. 
261. V ldosta-A. J. Gannon. 

ILLINOIS. 

Belleville— L Kloesa, 226 N, Gold st. 
Briuhton Pake— O. Gratton, 3809 S. 

Albany Ave. 
Champaign — O. P. Miller, 407 Thomas ave. 
Chicago- Secretary of District Council. 

Thos. Neale. 1 87 E. Wash st.. Room 7. 
W.G. Schardt. IWiE. Washingt'n St., Room 2. 
J_. H. Stevens, C02« Peoria st. 
T. J. Lelivelt. 1710 Fillmore at. 
French) P. Hution, 207 S. Center ave, 
Bohem.) John Dlouhy. 12.2 W. 21 PI. 
William W. Bennette. 17:10 N. Clark st. 



433 

70 

41. 



1. 

10. 
13. 



8:i 



66. 
161, 
242. 
416. 
416. 
521. 
266. 
169. 

42. 
360. 
141. 

174. 
434. 

166. 

•m. 

341. 
HO. 
183. 
195. 
169. 
166. 
It*. 

16. 



(Scan.) J.C. John«on HHH N. Washtenaw ave. 
(Ger.) Hermann Voell, 482 _ i Pautint st. 
Pred. betake, m W. Hlh st. 



SGer.) John Suckrau, 32. r >3 S. Oakley ave. 
Malta) Gust. Hansen, 732 N. Rockwell at. 
:OLLINSVlLLE— JOS. VujteCh, l^OCk BOX 471. 

Ba«T St Lotus— K, Weodlina. 612 111. ave. 
Bnulkwood— A. Wlslrom, 81. V) Aberdeen at. 
Galkshcrg -c J Johnson. K7H Wash'n ave. 
Ohd. Chohiso — J. Murray, 70K6 8. Chicago 
ave. 

lOLiKT— G D. Kanagv, 30, r i Richmond at. 
Kensington— (Pr.) Ed. La police, 214 W. 
116th st, 

Kkwanee— Chas. Winquist, Bex 11. 

Lake Forest— Jamea Dickinson, Bos 278. 

Moline— John •* >il i n. 1308 7th sve. 

Mob eland — H. Sharp, 2446 W. Ohio St. 

Peoria-J. H. Rice, 405 Behrenda ave. 
Ps*u— H. Baldest hwieler. Box 550. 
Quiwcv-F. W. Euacher, 838 b. Hth st. 
Rock Island -Wm Kniegcr, Jr., 1101 41 h. 
Sooth Chicago— J. C. Grantham, 8023 Ed- 

wards ave., Sta. 8, Chicago. 
Springfield— T. M. Blacken ship,T24 8.14th 
Wackegam— J. nem crest, 719 County at. 



INDIANA. 



352 

B 

90. 

213. 



60, 
281. 
215. 



48. 
<6A 



11th 



Anderson— Geo. Woodmauser. 235 
El wood- W H. Shaw, 1350 s. A. st. 
F.vansvillh — F, W. Klein, 513 Edgar at. 
Hartford City— C. O. Bault. 
Indianapolis- Secretary of Diet, Council. 

D. D. Stoddard. 144 E. Washington st. 
(Ger.) Paul Rahn, 1126 Laurel. 
I. T. Goode, 308 W. Maryland it. 
LapaykttR-H g. Cole, 2113 South st. 
Marion-J, M. Simons. 60» E. Sherman St. 
Muxcia — H. p. Baker, 413 8. Franklin at. 
Term Haute— a. Talcntlne, 724 S, 10th at. 
Vincennes— L«vl Taylor, 1206 Perry at. 

Jaa. HUmseyJt.S 8.S. 7th it 



Vj. SiiRtvi.POKr- L Malkus. Box Ml. 

MAINE. 

407. I.hwiston— C.Tisker,21 Turner at., Auburn 

MARYLAND. 

2!». Baltimore- W. H. Keenan. UUS W. Mul- 



44. 



berry at 



ry st. 
Ger.) H. 



Schroeder. 2306 Canton ave. 



33. 
216 

«2. 
424. 
. 123. 
4tW. 
111. 
376. 
1U6. 
221. 
IM. 
40-t 
275. 
198, 



«7. 
96. 

177 

Zi. 



MASSACHUSETTS. 

BOSTON- Secretary of Dist, Council. It. M. 
Taylor, lit) Whitfield St., I>orchester. 
C. J Gallagher, 8 Hand PL, Kuxbury. 
E, Boston — Hugh McKay .2vi Lexington st. 
Fall Rivsr— F, J. Traiuor. ltd Thomas 91. 
IIavkkhill- R. A. Clark. :U. Dudley st. 
IIinghau — R. E. Wherity, Box 113. 
HolVOke — F. Marchand, Iti Cabot St. 
Hudson — Geo. K. Bryant, Box IJ"> 
Lawrkncb— Wm. C. Gemmrl 17 Crosby st 
Lenox— P, H. Cannavan, Box JT. 
Lynn— M. L. Delano, 103 Ltwisst. 
MaRBLehead— R. H. RoJfch. I* Elm ct. 
M ari.doriv—J. O. Donohue, 37 School st. 
New Bedpokd — C.G, Francis., 218 North St. 
NEWTON— C. Connors, K2 West st. 
Nuhtii Adams- G. W. Houghton 1 Ryon's 
Lane. 

PiTTSFiEi.D— Chas Hvde. 16 Booth * Place. 
Roxm-RY— H. M. Taylor, 116 Whitfield St., 

Dorchester. 
Spring Fit Lit- ( French) P. Provost, Jr., Box 
lH-'i, Merrick. 
P. J. Collins. 1365 Matte at 
WOECManm- W.A Rossley, 5 City View ave 

MICHIGAN. 

105. Aipfna— B. D. Kelly, 4 Hi Tawas st. 
ll« BayCity-E. G.Gaie«, 216 N Rirney st. 
113. Calcm kt— W. L. Rogers. Box T26. 

1H. Detroit— T. S. Jordan. 427 Beaufntt ave, 
106 Grand Rapids— A. De Boer, 217 E. Grove at. 
173, Mi'NisiNG— A. L.Johnson. 
1 '**>. Mvskegon— Harlev W. Starke. 11 Marshall 

59. Saginaw— P. Frisch, 502 Word St.. E. S. 
334. Henry Wettlsufer. IHI Madison ft. 

46. SacltSt. Marie— A. Stowell,2H2 pott age av. 

MINNESOTA. 

3«l Dl'LUTB— John Knox, W. Duluth. 

7. Minneapolis- Hcnnlne Stubee, 2:103 K. -"2d 
L'liU Red Lake Falls— N. HolberR. 
K7. St. Pal l— Aug. J. Metxger.423 Kendo st. 

MISSOURI. 

Kansas Citv— Secretary of Dist Council 
John Kirk, 404 E. 12th st. 
75. J. E. Chaffin, 2220 Trooat ave. 
H, S. Thayer 205 W. 26th st. 
246, E. H. Price, 1716 Michigan ave. 
110. St. josBi'ii-Wm. Zimmerman, 1223 ft. 13th 
St. LoUIB— Secretary of District Council, 
R. Puelle 661 Market at. 
5. (Ger.) Aug. Kaiser, 2236 Shenandoah ave 
45. (Ger.) W. Wambnff. 1416 Moutgomery st, 

47. (Ger.)R. Fuelle. 810 Clark ave. 
73. Chas. Wrallng. 403.5 Easton ave. 

H /stai^»H r :D^o« 



I N, 



MONTANA. 



«8. Anaconda— C. W Siarr, Box 2i3, 
2.56, Belt — Wm Nollar. 
112. Bi ttk City-c p. Nugent, Box 623 
2Htt Great Falls-O. M. Lambert, Box 923. 

28. Mibboula-M.C. Pepple. 

NEBRASKA. 

427 Omaha— J, H. Maus, 8tl S, 28th »l. 

NEW HAMPSHIRE. 

118. Manchester- s. Thome*. 55 Douglass st. 

NEW JERSEY. 

Abburv PARX-Wm. H. Csrr, Box 897 
Bayonnr— p. A. Miller, 13 E. 53d st ' 
Bridge. on— J. H. Reeves, 145 Fayette st 
Camden-T. E. Peteison, 4:t0 Wafnutat 
E. Orange-L. P. Sherrer, 34 Bedford at 
Eluahkth— H Zimmerman 210 south st 

" < G *f^ John Kuhn, It spencerst 
Hacxknback-T. Heath. 312 Union st 
Hoboken — A. Crothers, 131 Jackson st 

" (Ger.)H Siever«,400Mooro e "st 
IRVINGTON-Chas. Van Wert 
Jersey CITY-Thos J.Devin,22ti Monti- 
cello sve. 

* m i ... f-v F / H y mn < m Ninth St. 
(J. C. Heights) John Handorf, North st. and 
Boulevard. DU 
Long Branch — Chai R, Brown, Box 241 
Long Branch City. ' 
MiLiirjRN— J H. While, Short Hills 
MlLLViLLB-Jss. McNcal. 622 W. Main st 
MoNTCLAim-Jas. McLeoc], 141 Potest st ' 
Morristown— C, V. Deals. Lock Box IV 



7.50. 
466. 
121. 
20. 
217. 
167. 
687. 

•m. 
mi, 

487. 

57. 
i:i9 

462 

564.' 

161. 

232. 
605 
429. 



119. 
120 



41H 

^ I. 
846, 

It, 
3JI 
711 
l«7. 
211 

lis 
ll'l. 

|Qg 
SJ&, 
40. 



HcrB i Henri. I-. S. .lh st. 

\ i. Beejrle, i- 1 " N M »t 
H-.er.) tl. Areudt, SKI Spnngheld nve, 

ORANGI - M. Motlock. 17 I ..ikiiiM.n ler 
Pvii-ksov -P. H. V»tl Botttea, 713 E. 27tnM 
rvs^vK- -John I.kf . SOU Highland *ei 
1'i arii AM*n\ « II. Bsith, JH 
p, in i M'stii M(.-W S t;atn»i»ti^ Ksyetteal 
PLAtHKIKLU— Wnt H Lunger, )'l weater* 

v. It kit,, N. I'l.iinlield 
TRENTON— J I K.niikr. J i Miukel st 

Psion Mm <■< r Ij.WortKlw*,™ A''""" 
st . IfobokvB. 

NEW ^ORK. 

271 .M ' AW- L. It. Ilarvev. M 3.1 at. 

,, ,.. tt.er ) W in. Frailklin Ifal Hlk St 

V muter dam- Lester Co*rf.lS6 MlllOtl H 
m \vi<: hn -E B, Koon, 116 Prsoklln at. 
ji Batavia i ; S iiooih 112 llarwtw w*9. 

213. tSlNGHASiriOK V W MckL.t, 12 Walnut at, 

Brooklyn— Secretary ol Dtatrict CottMit, 
Chii«. Priedrl &S lUtntodst, 
IS, Otto Aritiig. Ili'-'lir Kalh avt 
;.' iGer.Cab.Mkra.) II Mutiatet.Jffl Vetxnettost 
l.i s. Rilw Tobia, fiOJ Schenck ««e,. aVuh-llta h't 

12'i. M l. Casey, 63 New ell St. 

H7 c.i' Btosrn, 272 Howard ave 

17V W l>. BOSt Wick, 'AU Koet«llt<K •>»• 

j i r Ch is. D. Monroe. Kl st Matn'a awt. 

816, Mi Spenoi-. 15 I / - kist 

JM. n'.rri V Kramer. 66 Hamburg 

391 ft, B. Elliott, 12!<5 st Msik*»ave. 

4il Wm. Carroll, 7"-' llrrurll *t. 

■171 H. S. Thurber. »|8a l <iti >t. 
rill Archie Aimer*. 2ltl Stfdat. 

inn -At o -Secretary ol District Council, 

W. »Vreg«iU, 7» Kdward *t. 
I W. II. WreiiKitt 7* l-Mwanl »t 
... if.er ) Jno. r.r.wl". .'.J. lioal st. 

r\ o Yokom. 19 Fetjruaoaj net 

1. H. Mvt*rs, rVI l.arul.'ii st 
CoHOKS A. Van Artm '.'Jtleorge st 
CoLLKGK POINT — G. A. Pickel Mh ave aa.l 
11th at, 

Pvk Kock away — Matthew Murphy 
I'isitKi I l-oS-Hi*i>sc.\ -W W.Kuwe. BoS 216 
Fi.raii ISJO— F. S. Field. 1M New LOCWM M. 
Gknrv .x— tl W. Dailson, '-•». Hol'enlrrk a»e 
1 .lens Halls K. J. White I" Gage ave. 

Hemps n id— S. n. chestn. n.» *1 
iRviNGTON-kobert Brown. Hastingaon 
lliid>' n 

Ithaca — E. A whiting, s Aubnrn »t 
JvMKSTGWN D 6mtth, 7VI K Seconds! 
KtNosi'Rii'oE— John E. I-'urshay. s*t t'nlon 
ave.. New York City 
-'■l. Kingston— E. C Peterson. Box 15, Sub Sta. 
591, Um.1 Falls — T. R. Mangan IfJ W Mon 
roe. 

II. LOMO utLANDCrry JohnCurley Javs »t . 
Oreenpoinl. 
1ST. Mamibiini\k - Chss. E. T-nker. 
212. Mr. Vp.rndn-A. H. Parker, 273 W. Line -In 
avenue. 

4'i:t Jas H Perry. l."7 N 7th ave. 

MM. N'KWHt R'.— John i'emjjleton. IV kenwick. 

l.V New R.OC HULLS- J. V. Gatian. Hirch at. 
VT7. KatWToWN, L. I — W, II. Du Bols. ho\ Wt. 
Corntia, N. Y. 
New YulK- Secret.m- if District Council. 
D P. Featherston..#r W. ltld at 
31. J- J. Hewitt ■.:«•". E. Uid »t Carr NHIan. 
56. iFl«jor I.aveis) J. Hefner. 411 Sttinwav are 

L. I City, 
till Win. f. kyan,9o'^2'! rive. 
61. Thos. P. J . Col f m i o 7v««ihave Care Molte 
200. (Jewish) John floldfarb. K4 E lllth«t 
MB iGer. Cab. Msker«n Simon lluehl. .J I ltl av. 
310. D. Vanderbeek. 2.7i W 12Hthst. 
37V (Ger.) F. W. Mueller. 'Jv-'i Morris ave, 
3*2 H. Seymour, 131JO 2d sve. 
417. (Scan.) O. Wallin, 24 W 1 l«th St. 
4>lt (Ger ) A. Stumof. 648 E. l->4th at. 
161, Jas. Maguire, 221 Delancey tt. 
473. Wm Trotter. 7.VI Hth ave 
47tj Wm. K. P. Schwarta, 2 Brown's foin), 

AKToria, I. I 
47t J. J. Plaeger. 3417 3d ave. 
4H7 (Ger.) Gto. Herthold 321 K. 12th st. 
B09 John Men rail. 171 E "Cnd st. 
SIS, (Ger ) R, Kuehnel. til!' E, Hth st r rear. 
707. (Fr Canadian! Geo. Menard. 157 E. 7Hth «, 
715, Chas. Camp, 233 W HWh at. 
7H6 (Ger. Millwrights and Millers) Henry Mask 

3. r >7 Linden st , Brooklyn. 
171 NyacK-R F Wool, Box 463. 
101 oneonta— C W. Burnside. H Walling ave. 
163. Pbkkskii.l-C. T Powell :«B Simpson pi. 
77. PoHTcHEsrKR— Anton Nel'in. Bos 127. 
2tr3. PovaMXRBPaii:— J P Jncobson, Bos 62. 
72. Rochester — H. M. Fletcher, ASnvdrrst 
179. - (Ger.) Frank ,Schwind.'4 May PI 

3BI. " John Huehrte, :» Bnchao Fark. 
14ti SciiENECTADY-Henrv Bain, 32n Craig st 
Statrn Iri.anij— secretarv Dist. C uncil. 
J. W. sheehan, 174 Broadway. West New 
Brighton 

60S Pout Richmond—!. Keenan, 236 Jerseys!,, 

New Brighton. 
667 Stapleton-p j. Klee Bozr^.V 

SvRACt'SB— Sectetary o( Diatilct ( ouncll, 
E E Battey. 117 East Genesee st. 
15 (Ger,) J. R, Kysn ,12ft l.pbhardl ave 
2rt E E Battey, 117 E. Genesee at, 
lira. A. J Dsmlrande. 2-Vl flertrude. 
7ft Troy— David Kn>g Bos *v>. 
133 DtiCA-G. W. Griffiths, 240 Dudley ave. 
ftHO Watektown— W. J. Mullen, 121 A. Main si. 
Westchester Cocntv— Secretary of Dis- 
trict Council. las. (lagan, 110 Ilugenol. 
New Rochelle, N. V. 
172. Westchester— Chaa Baater.Middletown rd 
12K. Whitestonk— Geo. Briton, Boa 8. 
563 Williams Briixve— John Rrtgley, White 

Plaint ave . bet. 1st and 2nd sis. 
273 YonkerS-E. C. Hulae, 47 Marde st. 
726 F. M. Tallmadgr. 216 Elm St. 

NORTH CAROLINA. 

384. Ashevillb-G. C, Lumley, 51 Blaaton at, 

OHIO. 

64. Akron— A. H. Bates, 189 N. Howard at. 

132 Barberton-W. I,. Keller. 
17. 1IKLLA1RE— G. W. Curtta. 363H Harrison at 
170 HRloGkroRT— John D Glenn, Box 41. 
110 BUCYRBB—J. S. Br van ttll Maple at. 
21) CAMiiRlDGK-V. C Pergurson. 
149, Canton — Chas. Rimtuel, 526 N, McKinley 
ave. 

Cincinnati— Secretary of District Council, 



I. H. Meyer, 23 Mercer st. 

2. J. ft. r- 



i ii. iutjci , tmt Ktcivri n, 

^ Overbecke, 26S llsckberry at., Walnut 

209 (Ger.) Mi ^ ist Weiss, 909 Gest at. 

327 (Mill) 11. Brink worth, 1315 Spring st. 

626 A. Berger, 422!* Fergus at. 

667 D. J. Jonei, 2223 Kenton at.. Station D. 

«7fi. Joa I^ng, Boa 3iil, Carthage. 

693. J. P. Luckey, 2127 Bloom at. 

Cleveland— Secretary of District Council. 
P. A Moran 168 Superior at-, Boom 10. 
1L H. L, Lepole.lgPoeavt. 



II 11. l-rler«tn.7l»l Adsms 
Hoehirr. il 2 W Perry »t 
, |,| 646 U'lt.mh si 
Lirt t . 2UI Kalni ei »l . 



gy (BOaem | V I'leclial v. IS Jewrlt at. 

;i. i tin 1 I lien Welhrtch, 10 I'siker ave. 

il * (Gel 1 Wm H st hultf, 3u Contarl at 

til i ..| > Ml" ■> A C Wrlch 1127 Highland st 

KM davtun W C Smltb. isa« ] m h» iv ,i 

IIM ,i.rr I [OS W irth, 811 CI. .vet *t 

3J6 K f..vr*l i W W I'aiirn l'>Thli.'«i 

6R llAM.i.rox W C Mnaeh.flOB Eaton «t 

!•»_' I imi l> I-! '-pen lit M second M 

7UM i ..,ki\-., CharleaE IfertPt, Bos Iftl 

i-i Maatitts i w Forester f 3 Woster lai.i 

HMI I - mi Rut I u wri 

117 PtiRTKMut-ru C ThntMaj, I to Campbell 

uve 

Ivi Sri i io StVII I ' 
34 i Tn i in W M 

-'• r«t p i 

I'.i (l",rt . 

ITI Vol TOWN W S Moyet, 711 Augu>ts ! 
7|i. /ANRSVtl LR— Pred. Kappea, Ceutral »vr , 
10th Wsr.l 

ORI'ttON. 

ill Imsiiani. D.ivi.1 llrndrraon. Bos M6 

I'lLNNSVLVANI A. 

Alt I ..in xv i irv — 
211 J. W 1'ir- hi Washington ave 
•^17 [Ger.) A Weliinan. "l Ttoy IMl rosd. 
Ii. AtXKWTOWN A M Mojreff, 13* K. r Mh,«t 
im Bkavhr Fmlh-A nnrry. Iioa Ml, N-w 

Hrighl.pti 

6W. Hi Tin Kin m I. M >i winker 112 Broad wa, 

s ilnhletirm. 
121. Ba no »sp-u . II M.ytuiwn, V. Wash tie 
„"i: mi ^ re - Eber s Rigt.v 1IS I- Fifth at ■ 
3« FiMnv -Frank I' Horn Hi that ler at 
III GttRMASITDWat— J E Martin. 126 E DwVsl 
I'ii I'.aK.KNsiit'ai.- J II B Howe 2Tt»i t oncor-1 
2S7 Mttm.Kt k - W. Itohnrr , l^T.' I'eflei st 

I2i HatLRroN tin. >\ \ri 44t) w. Green >i 

2<4 HoMRATf.AD Kitwln K'.wr It. L Box 'iJ7 

2** Lan. miii | cm Hmttb, Z8t Cheater al 
Jtsi. S. « i i^im wm w hile, I. car«©ti al 
LL t Ni:« l.i\si-,.i •< C sV. Au.entsn.h. 
-''■J PkCKVIt.LS T K Sj-.ngrnburg 

run ADRl i in \-<--c District Council, John 
Unison 2W * Ja-ptr it . Htatt.". K 
* W C Hall 1433* Nmrtern h l 
227 «Ken«ini(t..iii Juhti Wstso'. 3616 J««l>er st 
■.islloii tC 

33* It'.n I joaeph Oyen.Rll N Fourth at. 
SIM (Mill) J Durrin^rt J f IWUP F Hunt>ngd in 
Il r IS' L'Rf.n ^cre^ary ol In strict ConMtl. 
J II >ny.ler 113 r.taol si 
112. H. G AchnsMkei l.*> t»heiman ave , Alleg 

I'M (Ger i I* Geek 21 - ■ 1 u* m >t 

1*1 tH Rnd] h. Roherisor 338 Princeton pi, 

2'J G. w MeCanslaid, 130 Lambert M., ■ E. 

SW W. J Richev. l«'l Cirwn si 
4". 1 (Ger 1 Louis l auker Kl Eurrka st . 31 Wtt 
I 'l I't.YMii' Tir Q. H Edwsr.ls b- 1 1040 
M'miniN H. C Scott. 717 L»eC urt 
1X1 s Scran to* n.er 1 T. mhuIi, rear 109 B 
Mnut ate. 

:t7 KiiamoKI'* H A t, Smink M" V. Caruet. r> 
366 KRAROa R H M.Clrerv. IV^x <>4 
7i7 Till >a -<;rorgr Wicks, Box 4'i 

"I tt is ki s Bassi: I) A t ost, ncmderellaat 

\ H Avers, .'.I Pvnn a:. 
10 Vore-C Snydrman. »U'N Weat at. 

RHODE ISLAND. 

.1" Central Falls- H. A '.aboriantt, 46 I'erry 
I7rt Nhwi-.iht r H Daw ley. IH I^vi-. »i 
it2 PiivT-cmn J B I'arquet Boa 163, Valley 
Falls. 

<M PR..VU.F.NCB P Hulls, 9 Lawn St. 
117. WoiiNiotRET-J A I'taray H4 Orchar ! at. 

SOUTH CAROLINA. 

52 CHARl.RsTon-{Col i J..hn Pinckner.17 Hat 
69 CoLr aiaiA-(Col.i C A. Thompson, 1.J3 K. 
Taylor si. 

SOUTH DAKOTA. 

iin Lead ClTV-K M. Spink 

TENNESSEE. 

m. Jack»on-D. E Holland t«l l^og at. 
2T> Kni.ivilI.K-W W. Ksmsey, 3HI Fousha St. 
m Memphis- (Col l II C Ellison .24 D..pree at. 
364 J E Wright, K2 Manassas at. 

TEXAS. 

300 acstin-J. 1 Webh. WiW llthst. 
IH.. llrbl-mne-J. c. i .reen. 
193 Dallas -Wm Walk 11. Bos 2Pa 
371, DSsnaoN-W W. Neighbour, 1315 W. 
' .ori.lv ave. 
GALVtSTON-Secretarror Distriet ^ 

M C B>.wde». '«JU vtb st. 
526. J. E Proctor. I ill 19th si 
"II. (Ger ) Otto Vlererk, 1368 Ave M«, 
III. Hrit BToN- W X. Morris. KM Rusk St. 
M. Oa «n.,k C B. Fsvne 
166 Poet Aktih-r Hugo Bcholtae. 
4«<» Ban Anhimiu -(tier J Aug. X lea. 302 Plum. 

*' " A G Wietxrl I.Vj Centre si 

«£i Waco— A E. Widmer, Labor Hall. 



UTAH. 

ITV-P. C. 

VERMONT, 



161. SALT LARK CITV-P. C. HOrlder, 1111 V 5l h 
»./. St. 



263. ST. Albans Geo 



Weldenst. 



WASHINGTON. 



131. Seattle- Fred. Blenkina, 
98. Spokank-J A.And.rber. 



, E. 524 Blaine. 

WEST VIRGINIA. 

236. CLAHE»»uRrt-J. W. Stealey. 
438. Faiemoont-W. R. Hickman, 42* 

226 Parekrsboro-S. M. Carter. 931 Slat at 
8. Whkelino-A. L. Bauer, I8tB Jacob st. 

WISCONSIN. 

m G been Bat— H, Mdiler, 1126 Cherry at. 
161. K I . nosh a- H. C Goaeliue, 7*) Park a« 
Milwaukee— Secretary of District Coi 

™ ,„ Charles Heuer, /iOI twenty 6fth st. 

30. (Ger.) Wm, Dublin 1610 Prondnlac ave. 

71, (MUl-rsJ W. Trantman.,1321 Vliet 
1S6. Aug. J. Hag-n, 761 34th at, 
T«. (Ger ) R. Meyers, 7fl« 19th ave. 
622 (Ger.) Chaa, Runge, 1325 Llovd st. «- 

1 is^^Ss^^&r rt - 



\ 



THE CARPENTER. 



MORRILL1S PERFECT SKW SETS. 

Bench Stops, Car Sealers. 

Universal Punches. 

Cutting Nippers 

Charles Morrill, 

35 Warren Street, New York. 



sag 
arc 






I . H. C. A J. or America Society Hoods. 
ESTABLISHED 1866. 

CHAS. SVENDSEN, 





THE FINZER TOBACCOS 



are 



UNION LABEL GOODS 

(Union Label on each box.) 



Regafia and Badges. 

Orer w» Sodrtr Flag* and Buntn Manufac 

■d. Ow '<«» iSocienea furnUbed 



No. ao 



Court St., 



HAMMACHER 
SCHLEMMEH 

&CO. 

ft O B BOWERY 



United Hatters of North America 




Reed & A uer ^ ac ^ er > 

229 BOWERY, 



Fine Tools. 



Every Union Man should aid THE NATIONAL TOBACCO 
WORKERS UNION by using one or more of the fol- 
lowing brands : 

OLD HONESTY PLUG 

JOLLY TAR PLUG 

CANTEEN PLUG 

BOOT JACK PLUG 

WILD ROSE SMOKING 

FIVE BROTHERS PIPE SMOKING 

,SrAny dealer will order ANY BRAND you prefer. 



Wm. McNiece $ Son, 



la the 



ITaitei Hatter* or North America. 

When y*» buy! of a fur hit, cither »ofl or 
Miff, aa* U .it the GenuiM Onion Labd 1* 
sewed In it- if a retailer hftaloote label* in Ma 
pqaaraalnn and ©Here to put one in a hat for 
you done! paironlie him. The chance, arc lint 
the labels arc cog tit* r felt . 

The genuine Union Lobe! ta perforated on the 
focrr edge i exactly Uat tame aa a jiosUge Mump. 

JOHN A. MOP PITT, Pre».. 
JOHN PHILLIPS, Sec'T. Oranfe, K. J. 

4T7 Park *»•.. Brooklyn, M. V. 



Carp 



Henry H. Trenor, 

enter and Builder 



A Complete line of 
everything good 
in Carpenters' 
and Joiners' 
TOOLS. 

Send lor our Tool Catalogue. 

LOUIS ERNST & SONS 

129 & 131 East Main St. 

ROCHESTER, N. Y. 



515 




PA. 



Panel 

and Rip paws, 

FROM THE TEKY BEST CAST STEEL. 




Thia Label la printed In black ink on li-ht blue 
paper, and b pasted on the 
a up with the D. 3. Rerenue label on the 
the latter U nearly of a similar color. E 
the Cigar Maker. Bine Label appear, on the box 
from which you are aerred. It 
againat Chinese-made cigar* 



Lector St., New York. 

1S1TS rortlnnd. 

Stores, •Counting Booms* Etc. 

Fitted up with Dispatch. 

Jobbing of nil kind* 

Promptly and W.nttj 



CARPENTERS, LEARN TO CUT A ROOF 

MODERN Roofs and Roof Catting 
simply and plainly explained so that any 
carpenter can It-am to cut a roof or 
money tefunded. 

Price, One Dollar, postpaid. 

Agents Wanted. Address. 

A. C. CULLMANN, 

1015 FERRY ST., LA CROSSE, WIS. 



First Class Books, 

AMD USEFUL 

Mo d> an OiUtrin anr> Bciijhmj. 
SylTeatw . . Ii SO 

Tub BrjtLDBaVa Gnoi awn Ebtimato»B 

Paic« Book. Hodgaon . tj <0 

Warranted the Best in the World g»~ SS^m^Z^S 1 » 

errjia-flrn i>iho Ma on Kami. Hodgeon 100 

Hapd Ratuao Hira Raby . . t*m 

Tub OispnTfR'a and Buit-una a Oon ^ ^ 

HAN AADK. uj— p J MeGctBn, 

SM, Philadelphia, Pa. 



The Sworn Printed Circulation of This Paper is 
19.O0O COPIM MONTHLY 



IMPKOVED 

Lalxjr- Saving 

CARPENTERS* 

TOOLS. 

STANLEY 

RULE & LEVEL CO. 
New Britain, Conn. 

BOLD BY ALL 

Hardware Dealers. 



Stanley's Improved Victor Circular Plane. 




No.20. Circular n«n.', Nirkt-1 Plated, 1* in. Cutter, **W 



THE CARPENTER. 




LANE'S BARN DDDR HANGERS 




•< rriiuAKD." 

W« are the originators and large it makera of U -shaped 
Oat the IENUINE LANE HAN0ER for best satisfaction. 

ALSO LANE PARLOR DOOR MANSERS. 



(Jooda Sold by all E1« dw.re 
A* ad tmr mm* IM»t«fU ml H»rdw»j 

LANE BROTHERS manufactuhiri, 
COMPANY. P0U8HKEEPSIE, NEW YORK. 



ULUIHIHH. 

Oet your dealer to buy ib.w Rood, he'll do it for the Uklsf end you'll boip the UN ION 
oiuae— or we'll ■end yn Upe rneeaure. sample and loll itifi»ur«iwnt blank, with ■ 
dainty tti It edged Russia leather pocket memorandum book tree. 

CARHARTT & COMPANY, DETROIT, MICHIGAN, 

that la mftkine UNION MADE Clothing popular. 



Norcross Brothers 



160 Fifth Avenue. New York 
Tremont Building, Boston . . 



Worcester. Mass _» 



FOX'S LOCK MORTISING TOOL. 




Thla la the Tool that saves one-half the time In putting In Door Lock*. It'a the curve that 
It. Why so ? Because 00,000 earnemera say so. Per aale by the trade, or 
of price, 11.00. Write for circular. 



P. Lr. FOX & CO., SOLE MANUFACTURERS 

BRIDGEPORT. CONN. 




P. C. ECKHARDT 

General Contractor $ Builder 

693 Ninth Avenue 

Between 47th end 48th Streets 
TELEPHONE 1050-38 NEW YORK 




Adjustable and Folding H'dle D, K. 
MANUFACTURED BY 

A. J. Wilkinson & Co. 



180-188 Washington St. 

BOSTON, MASS. 



Carpenters' Knives 
Rebladed 




23c. per BLADE 



Blades made to tit any handle, terni 
cope in hard wood We make ft 
Inch Knife and will 
Suited BUte* for GO * 
11.00 In 



Order* by 

E. LOCKWOODi 

190 POPLAR ST., CHELSEA, MASS. 



Sworn Circulation of THE CI "PENTI 
19,000 COPIES MONTHLY 

AflrertlslBf Medium for Tool MuMbetarere, Wood WorUo* 
*»■ Building MeUriol*. Abo of 



ANCHOR BRAND 
Adze Eye Nail Hammers. 



LARGEST MANUFACTURERS IN THE WORLD. 

Fayette R. Plumb, Phlla., 



PATENTS 



QalaUraw 
OITADntO. 



•wvrvi on rn Din wium iatdtt 

A*«d mod.1, ak.trh or photo, wiik. [ 
I daripUni fnrfmr.r'jriMio I'M* null uitr. U fill 
UJQ-aoOZ niX. CosUklni iifcmr** unil tall 

I isromutioD. warn f on 00 rr or 00m araaui 



OFFEft. If if i h« oio.t M tanl HMaal ii-m ittrBil* by I 
a paint Mtannj, and IVI1T XMTUTTOft noVLD | 
aXAJ> IT Won kppIjUg for ptmtl. 444km i 

H.B.WILLSON&CO, 

PATENT U#VIR1, 

WASHINGTON. P. C. 



For Advertising Rates 

IN 

THE CARPENTER 

Apply to 

P. J. McOUIRE. 

124 North Ninth Street, 
PHILADELPHIA, PA, 
i 




W. S. Thomson 

Manufacturer and Dealer la 

WOOD WORKERS' SUPPLIES 



Belting, Belting Hooka, Lacing, B 
■nd Circular Saws, Filea, Emery Wh. 
Babbit Metal, Planing Machine Knivea, 
Cuttcra, Etc. 

418 and 420 Wert 27U et. New York 

Ail< 




A Monthly Journal for Carpenters, Stair Builders, Machine Wood Workers, Planing Mill Men, and Kindred Interest!. 



VOL. XIX.-No. 2, I 
Established 1881. \ 



PHILADELPHIA, FEBRUARY, 1809. 



I 



Fifty Cents Per Year. 
Single Copies, 5 Cts. 



Henry Disston & Sons/ STA ~:: nl ™™ B nic 

- Philadelphia, pa., u. s. a. * SAW, TOOL, &TEEL AND FILE WORKS, 

SAWS, FILES AND TOOLS FOR THE MARKETS OF THE WORLIX 

No. 12 Hand Saw. 




Our Saws have all the Latest Improvements, and are warranted superior to all others. 

They hnve no rival in quality, finish, arul general utility, and are made from the best steel, and of superior temper. The grinding, by o 
Improved Machinery, in use only hy ns, makes them ibx* easiest running Saws in the world. They heve gained a universal reputation among 
and are sold hy all the promim-nt Wholesale ami Retail Hardware Dealers in America and Europe. The manufactures of this firm have secured 
Premiums at all the World's Great l airs, where ihey have been exhibited. 

And we Uuarantee a Retter Article, at the same Price, than any other House in the World. 

AIjIj OOODB HEARINO OUR NAME ARE FULLY WARRANTED 



ur New aad 

mechanics, 
the highest 



TAINTOR 
POSITIVE 
SAW SET 

Th»-..iiJ< nf till, to*] 
I). uri -a d, and tbmj 
'• highly couimaadatl by 
' nliu una thatn, 




If your Hardware Deat- 
•■r clttfia not liamlle them, 
tlnn't take an IntVriur a*t 

l>C«aU". MM M. 

" tt'a j -jut a. good." 

TAINTOR MFC, CO. 

9 to 15 MURRAY ST. 

NEW YOHK. 



v i Far. ' ii ii'i i mil ^ . 

'("HymyaMii - - 




6 S 



I 



UNION CARPENTERS ASK FOR. 



NEWBURGH, KEYSTONE, UNION-MADE 

Overalls, Coots, Pants - Carpenters' Aprons 



Your dealer will gladly 
furnish you these ex- 
cellent goods if you ask 
for them. 



Cut, 

Made, 

Sold, 



FOR SALE BY DEALERS IN BUILDERS HARDWARE 



THE ONLY ABSOLUTELY NOISELESS 
DOOR HANGER ON THE MARKET... 




For lioltiiui Prices 
Mention this Paper 



The McCahe Parlor 
Door Hanger, No. a 




The McCabe Hanger Manufacturing Co. 
532 W 22d Street N. V. City. 

"TRUii AS A DIE." 

WROUGHT STEEL LOCKS 

OROIDE KINISH 

.Strong, Durable, Inexpensive 

I or Sale by all Hardware Dealers 

Carpenter*, will appreciate tin- lad that the 
nieitfturenientts <■>( those locks are and Must be 
exact, an true M H die cm intike thetn. No 
trouble anil vei .lion in litlm»; .... 

(MtHlitK 1 " <>t Wruuglit fclafl Lurk a and Li>ck 



CLEVELAND & WHITEHILL CO. 



RUSSELL & ERWIN M'F'G CO. 



)Naw Britain, Conn, 

Philadelphia. 



New York 

Baltimore. 



MOORE'S 

IMPROVED WROUGHT STEEL STORM 
WINDOW FASTENERS 

With these fasteners, storm windows can 
lie adjusted more easily, and held in place 
more securely, than in any other way yet 

invented. 

NO LADDER REQUIRED. 

Fastened frcai the insMe, the only tool 
necessary being a small hammer. 

Send for Circular*. 

The Stanley Works, Dept. M. 

NhW BRITAIN, CONN. 

7q Chambers St., N. Y. 




THE CARFEN13R. 



HIGH GRADE MACHINERY 




CARPENTERS, BUILDERS, SASH. 
DOOR, BUND MAKERS, ETC. 

• u Single Machine* *w Bqulpmante 



No. 1. Variety Wood Wobkbb. 
A moat valuable machine for Carpenter., 
Builder.. 8Mb, Door end Blind Maker*, etc, 
a* on it 70a can perform a *ert*1y of work 
which would otherwise require the uee of 
•eve)*) machine*. 



J. A. Fay & Co., 



-Si 4-5 3 4 W. Front St., 
CINCINNATI, OHIO. 



STANDARD WOOD WORKING MACHINERY 




OF EVERY DESCRIPTION. 



No. X Plankr, Matchbb a.d Mouldeb. 
Plaoee, one elde, M Inchee wide by « 
thick. 

Moteb.ee latnoheewldes 
in invaluable machine for eaiuall or U 



If in need of i 

Ago re with yon, m we < 
hit* r ou money. 

illustrated 312 page eataloiae frM If yea 
have B*od iaa for H. 

The Egan Company. 

406-4*6 W. 




FOOT S HAND POWER MACHINERY 

COMPLETE OUTFITS. 
Cm penteri and Bulld.r. without steam power 
can •accewfnlly compete with the larne ebop* 
by u*ing oar New l abor Savins; flat inner y 

MAOHtNE. Bout ON TRIAL. Catmoous Fill. 

SENECA FALLS MFG. CO. 

St., Seneca P. 115, N.Y..U, f A. 




THE LATEST AND BEST. 




OUR NO. 141 
UPRI GHT MOU LDER 

Cutters can be kept low on 
spindles at all times. 

Spindles are of best cruci- 
ble ate el, with taper bear- 
ings — top aod bottom — and 
run in phosphor bronze box- 
es, the upper boxes being of 
the "fountain" type, supply- 
ing a continual now of oil 
over all parts of the bearing. 

Write us for further infor- 
mation, also for new cata- 



S. 1 WOODS MACHINE CO. 



flARTEN DOSCHER 

MANUFACTURER SAUQATUCK, CONN. 

Carpenters* Bench and Moulding 



PLANES 

Hand Made. 



HANDLES, 

MALLETS, itc. 



DOSCHER'S PLANES 



TOWER & LYON, 



96 Chamber* Street, 

NEW YORK. 

FINE TOOLS. 

Chaplin's Pat. Planes. 

Gerraf »tod Face or Smooth Face. 

Checkered Bibber Haadlea or Enameled 
Wood Haadlea. 

LEVER ADJUSTMENT. 
TOWER'S CHAMPION SCREW DRIVERS, 

BpetUl Bteel. Ttrtod Temga Ttwatr. 8olld Ta>r.d Bolitor, H**tt Mall F.ml*. Fl.ud HaadW 





Sworn Circulation of THE CARPENTER 

19,009 COPIES MONTHLY 

Beet AdverUaing Medium for Tool Manufacturers, Wood 
Working Machinery, Hardware, Lumber and Building 
Material*. Alao of Special Advantage to 




THE SQUARE ROOT 
DELINEATOR 

Of\ KEY TO THE STCCL SQUARE *, 
OY A.w.woopa, 

G/VTS IN PLAIN FIGUffES TKUNCm 
rfUHS, TflSES, PITCH, DC&f£Et, €i/r<S AM 
BEVELS fOff ZVCN AND UHEVCH PfTmCkX 
HOPPVf CUTS, BOAffD MEA&UlfE £K.; 

5eht post paio. PRtct $1.00 



p 



BOX AM. 



THE CARPENTER, PHU j kP cLfHw\,r»A 



I. mi. ia ion im w 

If you are a carpenter, 
a contractor, a lumber 
dealer, a real estate 
agent, or if you are 
going to build a house, 
send 5 cents for Hicks' 
Illustrated Catalogue 
of artistic designs. . . 



t. P. HICKS 



H Station A 



Neb. 



What It 
Your Work? 

If jou err iliaeatietied 
with yitur ait tiatiun, ruur eal- 
"ar» ( jonr chanrcH wt <-mxipjHc^ ( 
■nerve*, writ** to Th* f nlrmetlnpa] 
f ODrreHpettiJtfiicifi Hn-hiH^n Hrrantnn, P* i 
and learn how other* mo «itaat*4 an f etlina- 

[An Education by Mail 

Student* In the enure*, of Mechanical or Bl*e- 1 
trtcal Bnain-crina, Architecture, or any ot M 
the OWU Knalnwrln*- flour*** ar* ^Ej- 
. .eon qualified fur Mlaried draft- jaF? _ 
V log ninin position*. Writ* .^W— BJ,— 




The lar C »»t a.d aaoet 
MawplatollaM «f Wm*. 
worklaa; Maehtmarr be 
the world for Oarax 



Watd WsrUag 

skim* Oa. 



r h 



etc*. Oft, Ltd.. OoodaU d 
Water*. Hojrt d Bio. Oft, 
The Levi IT neat on O* , 
- Mob Oo„ KUwaa- 

m». oo. t a b. 



ALLEN B. RORKE 

Builder *m 

and 

^Zontr«ictor 



f 



Offices i- 
PtuJadtlphia Bourse, 

^PHILADELPHIA 




Satisfaction 

Is given all around when the house Is 
trimmed with Sargent's Hardware. The 
Architect is pleased because he speci- 
fied it ; the owner is pleased each time 
he looks at the trimmings because they 
add so much to the beauty of the home, 
and everybody is pleased with the work- 
ing of Sargent's Easy Spring Locks. 

Sargent & Company, 

Makers of Artistic Hardware and 
New York ; and New Herea. 



I 




A Monthly Journal for Carpenters, Stair Builders, Machine Wood Workers, Planing Mill Men, and Kindred Interests. 



VOL. XIX.-No 2. 
Established 1881. 



} PHILADELPHIA, FEBRUARY, 1899. 



Fifty Cents per Year. 
Single Copies, 5 Cts. 




Present Prosperous Condition of the 
United Brotherhood. 



I 

— • 



1 



5 



Gi:v Auowav has been thrice re- 
jected from membership in Union 55, 
Denver, Col. 

J* 

P. Cavanagh, formerly of Union 
509, now a member of Union 64, New 
York City, accused of being a defaulter 
has had his case investigated by the 
D. C. of New York. The charges have 
been found untrue. 



William Craig, formerly of Union 
170, Bridgeport, O., Is a stick fraud. 
He skipped that town leaving numer- 
ous creditors and Indebted to several 
Union members. He 1b 5 feet 10 inches 
high, biack hair and black eyes, and 
claims to be a stair builder, carver, 
artist and photographer, 



Any member or Local having 
copies of The Car i -enter for De- 
cember, 1897, will confer a favor by 
sending two or three ol them to this 

office. 

Local Unions and District Coun- 
cils should amend their By Laws and 
rules to conform to the new Constitu- 
tion. See Sections 48 and 49 on that 
score 

J* 

Proceedings of January session of 
G. E. B. will appear in oar next 
issue. 

dH 

New Constitutions, English and 
German, are now ready. Five dollars 
per hundred. Send in your 
with the cash to the Q. S.-T. 



f I 



I 




Wii.i.ia» cirifhitr, Union W7, Atlanta, Ga., 
for misappropriation of fund*. 

J* 

David Michaud, Union 122, San Francisco, 
Cnl., fur aeriou* violation! or trade rules and 



For the first winter In over five 
years, since the industrial crisis has 
been fully under way, we can safely 
report a larger percentage of the 
membership at work all over the 
country, though work in the larger 
cities still keeps flat on account of 
the changes in building construc- 
tion. 

The prospects for the corning spring 
are exceedingly bright, and numerous 
trade movements among carpenters 
for the ei?ht-hour day are reported to 
this office— a greater number than we 
have known In several years. 

Our net membership In good stand- 
ing since last August to date has not 
varied one hundred in the aggregate, 
where even in the best of tlmeB, 
during November, December and 
January, we usually suffered a loss of 
ten to fifteen per cent, in member- 
ship. This evidences our member- 
ship is less fluctuating and has 
become more stable and permanent. 

We now have over 400 Unions and 
31,600 members in good standing and 
benefit, and our cash balance at end 
of this month will be fully $2,000 
more than it was last September 
during the convention. 



Trade Movements 



Among Carpen- 
ters, 



John 
for 



Nbiswindii, Union 174, J ai Jet, II!., 

• Union 



The eight-hour day and a code ot 
trade rules will be established this 
season in Jersey City, N. J.; Trenton, 
N. J ; Seattle, Wash.; New Rochelle, 
N Y ; Elizabeth, N. J ; Indianapolis, 
Ind ; Scranton, Pa.; Des Moines, la.; 
and Springfield, 111. 

On January 27th, Union 264, 
Boulder, Colo., established the eight- 
hour day and Union rules. 

The nine-hour day and Union rules 
will be enforced this spring in Peck- 
ville, Pa ; Cleburne, Tex.; Jackson, 
Tenn ; Moline, 111., and St, Joseph, 
Mo.; and in Torrlngton, Conn , and 
Cambridge, O,, the nine-hour day was 
established recently. 

Union 146, Schenectady, N. Y., has 
adopted the rule not to work with 
non Union men. 

Racine, Wis ; Zanesvllle, O.; Pas- 
saic, N. J.; Perth Amboy, N. J.; 
Muncie, Ind ; Amsterdam, N. V ; 
Keewanee, 111.; Springfield, Mass.; 
Minneapolis, Minn.; and Troy, N. Y ; 
are arranging movements to secure 
stringent observance of the nine hour 
day and a standard scale of wages. 




Memphis, Tenn. — A committee of 
Union 394 waited on the Tennessee 
Brewing Company and had the Cole 
Manufacturing Company unionize 
their plant, where they were making 
bar fixtures. The result is an addi- 
tion of thirty-two new members last 
month. 

** 

Champaign, 111.— The Illinois Cen- 
tral Railroad Company has just com- 
pleted a new depot. Several weeks 
ago the Union men, through Union 
41, made a stand against the employ- 
ment of non- Union men and won the 
issue, 

J* 

Detroit, Mich. — Union 19 is en- 
forcing theruleof five dollars initiation 
fee. The German Union has gone 
over to the Socialists, and is barred 
from every central body. Prospects 
of work good, on account of Bl-centen- 
tary in 190 r. We have a committee 
out negotiating with the bosses. 

J* 

Buchanan & Lyall, Brooklyn, 
N. Y., have agreed to hire none but 
Union carpenters at $3 25 per day for 
eight hours work. 

J* 

Columbus, O —President Frank 
Westerman, of Uuion 61, was recently 
tried in the police courts for violation 
of the Anti -Trust law, and was ac- 
quitted. The charges were preferred 
by notorious scabs with whom Bro. 
Westerman and other Union men re- 
fused to work. 

J* 

Rock Island, 111.— Frank Mix- 
ture, manager of the Rock Island 
Stove Company, and one of the largest 
stockholders, has had his $6,000 
house built by scab labor. He op- 
posed the committee of Union 166 
that waited on him. The Riverside 
cooking and heating stoves ate made 
by this firm and sell very largely 
west of the Mississippi. Our mem- 
bers and friends can do without them. 
J* 

Columbus, O. — Nelson Morris & 
Co , meat packers, Chicago, erected 
a cold storage house In this city 
and the work was done by a notorious 
non -Union firm despite all our ap- 
peals to the firm. 



Rochester, N. Y. — The firm of 
Leon Lempert and Son, special de- 
signers of opera houses and music 
halls had charge of the Opera House 
job here— has broken every promise 
made to organized labor in this city. 
Wherever this firm goes It should be 
branded as unfair. 

Zanesvillk, O.— The S. A. Weller 
Company, potters, after a long contest 
against organized labor, lately signed 
an agreement satisfactory to the 

Unions of this city. 

J» 

Pittspurg, Pa.— The Carpenters 
Unions of this city are making an 
aggressive campaign to enlist the 
support of non-Union men to enforce 
higher wages and stricter trade rules 
this coming spring. Public meetings 
have been held and a circular to the 
trade was issued and with splendid 
results. 

Ottumwa, Iowa. — At a recent pub- 
lic meeting of Union 767, a large 
number of contractors attended and 
expressed their support. 

s 

Colum b us, O.— Union 61 has under- 
taken an active movement against 
contract work at the U. S. barracks 
buildings and is urging the day's 
work plan. 



Nine New Unions. 
Charters have been granted the past 
month to : Unions 49, Lowell, Mass.; 
130, Hancock, Mich. ; 263, St. 
Albans, Vt; 264, Boulder, Colo., 
and 138, Kansas City, Kan. (The 
latter is a consolidation of Unions 107 
and 180 of Kansas City, Kan.) Also 
to Unions 14s. Sayre, Pa. ; 153. 
Helena, Mont.; 201, Wichita, Kan., 
and 204, Co (Teen, 111, 



No More Arrears Notices. 



Under the newly amended Consti- 
tution now in force, no arrears no- 
tices need hereafter be sent by the 
F. S., as formerly, to members two 
months In arrears. That is dispensed 
with. See Section 89 (a) of Constitu- 
tion on that point 



Mayor Jones, of Toledo, O., has 
put an eight hour day into efiect for 
the police force instead of twelve hours, 
and without increased cost to the tax 
payers, and has adopted the 
system on all city public work. 



2 



THE CARPENTER. 




Wants a Rule for Tapering Shafts. 



Calculating Stuff. 



tor this Department mint be In 
by the 15th of thrrtiooih.) 



Making Windows Air Tight. 

From K. W. G., Titonderoga, N. V. 

I recently had a job here to make 
windows air tight and did it in this 
way : By taking off the outside blinds 
and rehanglng sash in their place, 
making a double sash. Then I put 
weather strips on the stop beads and 
outside blind stop and on the meeting 
rails of all the sashes. The decrease 



I 



ST it) J Jjr 

2JJ 



in the cost of coal has more than paid 
for the labor and cost of stuff and the 
Is cooler in summer. 



Fastening Trim to Stone or Brickwork 



From A. F,, Madison, Wis. 

What is the easiest and quickest 
method of attaching trim to stone or 
brickwork laid in cement, as the 
joints are so hard It is impossible to 
cut through them with a cold chisel 
and a hammer for plugs ? This work 
of drilling for plugs Is hard and tedi- 
ous and if one of the brothers will 
give me an idea on this it would help 
41 one who hates to do it." 



The Best Method of Hanging Adding 
Doors. 



From Cvril K , Montreal, Can. 

Sir : — What is the usual practice 
in the States in hanging sliding doors ? 
Are they hung from the top or set on 
track on the floor, and which is the 
better working method, as I find the 
settlement of the floors, if there be 
much, throws the doors out of level 
and they don't come to a joint ? 
Kindly answer and oblige. 

Note— The above letter Is placed 
before the brothers for their reply. 



Design for Boat House. 



From Wm, P., Ansonla, Conn. 

Would Mr. Wood please publish a 
design for a small boat house about 
25 x 60, one Btory high, with a peaked 
roof and two gables, with the prob- 
able cost of same. 



Let Us Hear From the Woodworkers. 

From H. P. C, Indianapolis, Ind. 

How is it that there is nothing 
published in The Carpenter about 
woodworking machinery ? There are 
a great number of woodworking 
brothers in the Brotherhood, and if 
they read the paper they should be 
glad to write something worth read- 
ing for the rest of us. Come on, boys, 
and let ui hear from you in 1899. 



From Unknown, Philadelphia. 

I have two tapering shafts and 
desire a rule in practical geometry 
that will equally divide their solid 
contents subject to each respective 
length, I have a number of rules for 





this but none of them appear to be 
correct. PerhapB either Mr. Magin- 
nis or Mr. Hodgson can give a correct 
rale for this, which perhaps may fill a 
long felt want and be a source of 
great satisfaction to many of our 
friends. 



From G. O., Portland, Me. 

Here is a ciaft problem for some of 
the wiseacres. Let them figure me 
up the amount of stuff board meas- 
ure of the following bill of material : 

LIST OK ROUGH TIMHER. 

Girder, planed, 1 yellow pine timber, 

S x 10 x 18 feet long. 
First floor beams, 40 spruce timbers, 

3 x 12 x 24 feet long. 
Second floor beams, 40 spruce timbers, 

3 x 12 x 24 feet long. 
Wall plates, 4 spruce timbers, 4 x 8 x 

25 ftet long. 
Studding, 100, spruce, 4 x 6 x 20 feet 

long. 

Rafters, 26, spruce, front, 3x6x21 ftet 
long. 

Rafters, 35. spruce, rear, 3x6x1s feet 
long. 

Collar beams, 26, 3 x 6 x 12 feet long. 
Ridge trees, 3. 2 x 10 x 2H feet long. 
Valley rafters, 2, 3 x 10 x 22 feet long. 
Bridging, 400 lineal feet, 2 >. x 3 
inches. 

Furring, 1,500 lineal feet, 1 x 2 .spruce. 
Hemlock sheathing, 3,000 square 
feet, ", x 8 inches 



KI.00BINC. 
L,$6<3 square feet of 2 x 3 Inch, yellow 

pine, tongued and grooved. 
1,5110 square feet % x 3 inch, tongued 

and grooved North Carolina pin- . 
6,500 Bquare feet celling, longued an<l 

grooved and beaded. 

All above stuff to be free from 
knots, shakes, etc., to be kiln drkd 
and of good quality. 



<iable Finish. 



BV A \V. WOODS 



R 

JLP 



V request of a reader we sub- 
mit a few gable ornaments 
suitable for cottages. 

These designs are such 
as we have used in our 
uwn wot it with good results. 

Gable ornaments are not as popular 
as they were a few years ago, espe 
cially for the better class of buildings, 
but for cottages or residences of mod- 
erate cost, work of this kind greatly 
improves the general spptarance of 
the house. Yet it h*s its objections 
in the way of costs, bitd roosts and 
keeping in repair. Work of this kind 
should be well made and joints well 
painted before putting together, and 
all but the last coat of paint applied 
before putting in place It is our in- 
tention to show other designs in this 
class of work. 



Buffalo, N. Y.— The central labor 
body of this city has won its fight 
in compelling the Edgemoor Bridge 
Company, Wilmington, Del., to respect 
the eight-hour day and weekly pay in 
constructing the Seneca-Hamburg 
viaduct. 





THE CARPENTER. 



S 



Some British Notes. 



IIY THOMAS RKKCK. 



Coming from the secretary of one 
of the largest Unions in the country, 
the remarks of F. Chandler, of the 
Amalgamated Society of Carpenters 
and Joiners, upon the now all absorb- 
ing question of Trades Federation, 
are worthy of the deepest attention, 
lie frankly does not much believe in 
the National Federation of Trades, 
which is being proposed — and has 
been proposed for the last fifty years 
in different shapes and forms. From 
his point of view national federation, 
if carried into effect, would only result 
in bringing into existence a parallel 
federation of employers, and, as the 
workmen federation would be bound 
to be weaker than the employers' 
combine, owing to the large number 
of non-unionists there are in these 
countries— in the pitched battle of 
massed forces which would even- 
tuate labor would most probably sus- 
tain defeat. 

* * * # 

lie casta, his vote in favor of more 
attention neinjr paid to each Trade 
Union's organization and expansion. 
Perfect the societies which now exist, 
lessen the huge totals of workmen who 
are outside these Unions, make every 
trade organization include, if possible, 
every worker in the trade, and pro- 
ceed with the older and quieter 
methods of obtaining concessions — 
above all things avoid unnecessarily 
alarming the plutocracy by any theat- 
rical but insecure show of magnitude 
—these are the tenor of his remarks, 
» * # ■» 

The Amalgamated Society is favor- 
able to an amalgamation of the kin- 
dred Unions in the carpenters and 
joiners trades, and has sent around 
circulars to the other large unions to 
that effect. William Maclntyre, of 
the Associated Society, has been in- 
structed, however, that his Union 
would not entertain such a proposal. 
W. Watkin, of the General Union, 
suggests a conference between his 
society and the Amalgamated, and 
it seems fairly likely that these two 
fine Trade Unions may, after a time, 
fuBe. 



A rather painful dispute has by 
degrees crept into the trade repre- 
sented b> this letter. In the naval 
dockyards, joiners have been recently 
doing work which the shipwrights 
consider (and I think correctly) to be 
their own particular vocation. These 
jobs have been such things as laying 
decks, erecting bulkheads, etc , and a 
tremendous amount of ill-feeling has 
been engendered in consequence. 
When the joiners at Devon port dock- 
yard commenced this kind of work a 
protest from the shipwrights secured 
a cessation of it. Now the dispute 
has broken out at Pembroke and some 
other yards. The joiners say that 
owing to the widespread substitution 
of ironwork for woodwork in modern 
vessels, that section of the joiner's 
trade is being gradually wiped out 
and they are entitled to get employ- 
ment at what was formerly regarded 
as shipwright's work. 



The end of it will, most likely, be 
that by a year or two the two hitherto 
distinct branches of dockyard work 
will be combined into one, bat until 
then a period of dispute and bad blood 
may be looked for. 

« * * # 

Reports as to the state of employ- 
ment vary considerably, London be- 
ing classed "fairly good," whilst 
other parts of the country swing from 
"moderate" to " well-employed, " 
The state of trade throughout Scot- 
land is " good," whilst carpenters in 
Ireland are having rather a slack 
time, except in Dublin. 

♦ * # * 

An attempt on the part of an em- 
ployer in Newport, Mon., to get his 
carpenters (who, by -the* by, were non- 
Unionlsts) to start work at an earlier 
hour than was usual throughout the 
trade was met by all the men ceasing 
work for four days. Then the boss 

withdrew the notice. 

* # » ♦ 

The London members of the A. S, 
C J are talking of having a Trades 
Hall for themselves in the metropolis. 
Greenwich Branch is taking the lead 
in the agitation, and as there are in 
London quite 7,000 members of the 
Union, distributed amongst nearly 
eighty branches, the usefulness of a 
centralized metropolitan headquarters 
is evident. London's share of the 
reserve funds of the society is about 
ninety thousand dollars, and it is sug- 
gested that a loan might be advanced 
against this to build the hall. This 
loan would be repaid to the reserve 
fund by a quarterly special levy of 
twenty five cents on London mem- 
bers. 

# # # * 

The Tyne members of the Union 
are still resolute in refusing to work 
more overtime than can be possibly 
helped, in order to give their unem- 
ployed comrades an added oppor- 
tunity. The employers have desired 
to break down this rule, but without 

success. 

# * # » 

The carpenters and joiners of Salis- 
bury have succeeded in getting an 
advance from twelve to thirteen cents 
per hour, making their average weekly 
wages now $7.50 The Selkirk men 
have gained an increase from fourteen 
to fifteen cents per hour. 

Notices as to Disability Benefits. 

Local Unions and members are 
requested to study Section 106 (b) of 
the new Constitution relating to 
claims for disability benefits. The 
old law has been amended, so sixty 
days' notice after surgeons or doctors 
decide a member is permanently dis- 
abled will be sufficient, provided 
claim is filed at this office within one 
year from date of accident. 

The Marlboro Shoemakers' Strike. 



A Beautiful Home 



BY I, P. HICKS, OMAHA, NEB, 



The Shoemakers of Marlboro, Mass., 
have been on strike several months 
against an attempt of the manufact- 
urers of that city to destroy the Boot 
and Shoe Workers' Union, Rvery 
effort at conciliation and settlement 
has been repulsed by the bosses. The 
following firms are the unfair ones ! 
S H. Howe Shoe Company, Marlboro, 
Mass ; John A. Frye, Marlboro, Mass ; 
John O'Connell, Marlboro, Mass ; 
Rice & Hutchina, Marlboro, Mass. 



is 



BHE plan here presented 
an elegant eight room resi- 
dence and an artistic de- 
sign which has been built 
from several times in differ- 
parts of the country. We have two 
modifications of this plan, in which 
the size has been reduced some, and a 
few other changes made to reduce ex- 
pense of building the house, in order 
to meet the requirements of those who 
wanted to build after this plan. 



12 squares first floor com- 
plete, $7.15 

1 2 squares second floor com- 
plete $7 50 

52 squaresoutside walls com- 
plete, $955 

1 7 J squares roofing complete, 

$8 75 • * • * 

1 2 squares ceiling complete, 

$4 75- »•_■••■« 
lS squares partitions com- 
plete, $7 20 .... 

140 lineal feet outside base. 5c. 

200 lineal feet corner casings, 
6c. ■*-**.« 

180 lineal feet belt course cas- 
ings, 6c. .... 

280 lineal feet main cornice, 
22c. . 



$85 80 

90 no 
305 60 

153 '3 
S700 

129 60 

7 00 

12 OO 
IO 80 
?! 60 




RIGHT ROOM HOUSE. 

The size of the house as shown by 
the engraving In this issue is 34 feet 
6 inches by 49 feet over all except the 
steps. Cellar under kitchen, pantry, 
bedroom, and part of dining room. 
Height of first story 9 feet, second 
story 8 feet 6 inches. 

The rooms are all large and con- 
veniently arranged. The house is 
calculated for hot air heating, and at 
the same time is well calculated for 
heating by stoves, the chimneys being 
placed so that they are available for 
all but one back room on the second 



FRONT ELEVATION. 

1 10 lineal feet gutter, 14c. 
24 lineal feet front porch, $3 
22 lineal feet back porch, 

$2.50 

28 windows complete $7 

6 gable windows complete, 

$5 

20 doors complete. $7.25 

3 double sliding doors com- 
plete, $19 
Basing two small rooms, $2 80 
Basing two medium rooms, 

S3 25 

Basing four large rooms, $3 80 
Basing ball, second story 
Wainscoting kitchen . 



-5 4o 
72 00 

j 96 00 

30.00 
14500 

5700 
5 60 

650 

IS 30 
3 00 
850 




floor. Space is provided back of the 
kitchen stairs for en ice box, and in 
the bath room for a large water tank 
The plan as a whole is a very pleasing 
and desirable one. The estimated 
cost is as follows : 

1 72 yards excavating, 25c. . $43 00 
800 cubic feet brick wall, 19c 152 00 
560 superficial feet brick cellar 

bottom, 10c. . 56 00 

41 lineal feet double flue 
chimney, $1.40 . 57 40 

1 8 lineal feet chimney breast, 

*a 50 4500 

18 lineal feet double flue 
above breast, $ 1 . 40 . . a j 2 o 



Wainscoting and finishing 

bathroom . . . 10 00 

Finishing pantry . . . 800 

Finishing china closet . . 1000 

Finishing five closets, $1 80 . 9 00 

Front stairs . . . 45 00 

Backstairs . . . .2000 

Cellar . . . . . 500 

Painting 780 yards, 18c. . 14040 

Plumbing . . . .21500 

Gas Fitting . . . . 25 00 

Tin and iron work . . 50 00 

Incidentals, 5 per cent. . 122,39 



Total estimate . , fa.570.1s 



THE CARPENTER. 



THE CARPENTER 



PHILADELPHIA, FEBRUARY, 1899. 




semicircle N, E, touching E, on the 
centre as shown, and the outline of 
the figure is complete. 

The narrowing up of the lines of 
the scroll may be accomplished by 
any of the methods shown in previous 
papers, the same centres being em- 
ployed, with slight variations, in every 



Curves as Used by Carpenters and 
Joiners.— XVI. 



BY FRED. T. HODGSON. 




(Concluded). 

N THE papers of this series 
that were chiefly devoted to 
scrolls, I did not make much 
reference to elliptical, or to 
irregular scrolls, and, as 
these are sometimes required, it may 
not be amiss to exhibit a few examples 
of this kind, and with this purpose in 
view the following illustrations and 
descriptions are presented. 



To describe an elliptical scroll to 
any height and projection from centre, 
proceed as follows : Divide the height 
F, C, or t, M, Fig. 154, into twenty- 
three equal parts, taking the centre 
E, ten divisions from the bottom ; 
through N, the first division above E, 
draw N, P, cutting the diagonal line 
E, O, at F. On E, as a centre, w'th 
a radius E, V, describe the circle, or 
through E, draw P, Q ; at right 
angles to the diagonal line, O, S, 
make E, P, and E. Q, each equal to 
E, F ; on F, as a centre, with the 
distance L, F, describe an arc, h, H, 
cutting E, H, at right angles to L, II, 





FlG. 154. — AN ELLIPTICAL SCROLL. 



Fig. 153.— an angular 

Fig. 153 exhibits what may be 
termed an angular scroll, and the 
method of describing the lines to form 
it, which is taken from a work now 
out of print, is as follows : Hie per- 
pendicular, A, B, Is divided Into 
twenty-three equal parts ; then make 
the centre of the eye on a line with 
the tenth division up, or thirteenth 
division down, and through this 
centre draw H, T, at right angles to 
A, B ; bisect the angle through the 
centre by the diagonal line D, C; 
through the next division above H, 
on the line A, B, draw K, E, parallel 
to H, T, cutting the line D, C, at E. 
On the centre of eye, with a radius to 
K, describe a circle cutting D, C, on 
the opposite side of the centre at E ; 
divide E, E, into six equal parts at 
3, 5, centre, 6, 4, and E, then with 
the upper E, as a centre and E, P, as 
radius, describe an arc, P, K , cutting 
D, C I then with radius from lower E, 
to C, describe the semicircle C, T, 
cutting H, T, at T ; o, 3, with radius 
3, T, describe semicircle T, K, con- 
tinue to L. On 4, as a centre with the 
radluB 4, L, describe the semicircle L, 
M ; on 5, as a centre with radius 5, 
M, describe the semicircle M, N ; on 
6, with a radius 6, N, describe^ 



St- R [4 * 



At II, irom E, make E, G, equal to 
the distance the projection of the 
scroll is intended to be from the 
centre; divide G, H, into six equal 
parts, and set one of the parts to I ; 
make E, K, and E, R, each equal to 
the sum of the two lines, K, F. and 
G, I. Through the points K, P, R, Q, 
complete the parallelogram A, B, C, 
D, whose sides, A, B, C, D, are 
parallel to P, Q. and A, D; B, C, 
parallel to K, B, draw the diagonals, 

A, C, and B, D, and divide each of 
them into six equal parts ; then on 

B, as a centre, with radius B, I,, 
describe the arc, L, I, cutting A, B, 
produced at b. On A, as a centre, 
with a radius A, 6, describe the arc 

c, cutting A, D, produced at C ; on 
B, as a centre, with the radius D, c, 
describe the arc, c, d, cutting C, D, 
produced at d ; on C. as a centre, 
with radius, C, d, describe an arc, 
d, e ; on 5, as a centre, with radius, 
5, e, describe an arc, e,/\ on 6, as a 
centre, with radius, 6,/, describe an 
arc, /, g ; on 7, as a centre, with 



radius, 7, g, describe an arc. g, A ; 
On 8, as a centre, with radius, fi, h, 
describe an arc, N, i Proceed in this 
manner, beginning the third revolu 
tion at 9, and end at 12. Lastly, 
describe an ellipse, touching the last 
centre of the third revolution, K, 
being its centre, and its transverse 
and congregate axis being in the 
same ratio as the length or height of 
the scroll is to its width, and the 
scroll will be complete. 

TblB is a beautiful example, and its 
construction cannot fall of interesting 
as well as instructing th*» young stu- 
dent. It belongs to the "higher 
curves, ' ' and a knowledge of the prin- 
ciples of the laws that underlie its 
construction, imply a familiarity with 
geometry of a high order. Later on 
I will, with the editor's permission, 
present a chapter or two on the 
"higher curves," and their relation 
to the building arts. 

At Fig. 155 I exhibit a design that 
may be used for many purposes. It 
was originally designed years ago for 



I 




Fig. 155. 



THE CARPENTER. 



a drop cornice of a verandah, but it 
would answer quite well for a "barge- 
board," or for a cresting. Indeed, it 
would prove quite effective for the 
latter purpose on a building of suita- 
ble style. As the centres and distances 
are all shown and lettered in the left 
hand diagram, a further description 
will be quite unnecessary. 

Fig. 156 is an example of cut work, 
intended to form one-half of a panel, 
the other halt being the same pattern 
reversed ; or the two ornaments may 
be used in two panels with a muntin 
or other device between them. 

At Fig. 157 I show two examples of 
ornamental panels. Each ornament 
terminates at A A, and may be doubled 
with itself, or may show only half the 
design, as exhibited. 

Fig. 158 shows another design 
suited for a panel or for screen work. 
One half is shown open, the other 
with a solid back. 

The design shown at Fig. 159 makes 
a very effective bracket, is easily 
designed and easily made. 

This paper ends the series, not be- 
cause the subject is exhausted, but 
because I have noticed that In these 
daya of "rush" and rapid changes, 
men get wearied, and often dissatis- 
fied at long and continued effort in 
one direction, so I close here, but will 
in the future, from time to time, add 




Fig 157. 

other chapters on 1 ' curves ' ' as neces- 
sity may suggest. I hope what haa 
been presented In this series has not 
altogether fallen on barren soil, and 
that some readers of Carpenter have 
been able to extract good and useful 
suggestions from them ; if this is so, 
I shall feel satisfied, and content that 
my efforts have been not altogether 
in vain, 

Next month, with the editor's per- 
mission, I will take up the questions 
of " Hopper and splay work," and 
while I cannot promise much that is 
new in the way of quicker methods 
for obtaining the various cuts, I think 
I may safely say that I will be able to 
present many of the old methods in a 
simple and convenient manner, and 
by divesting them of high sounding 
terms to some extent, render them 
more understandable to the man who 
executes the work. 

In dealing with the subject of 
"Hoppers, etc.," I will endeavor to 




Fig 156. 



Fig. 158. 




Fit;. 159. 



Approved In 



No, 

437H. 

4379. 

43X0. 

4;wi. 

43*3. 

mt. 

4385 

4.m 

4W. 

i:W. 
4:iKlt. 

mo. 

4W1. 

4.m 

4393, 
43!M 

4:at5. 

431*1. 
4897. 

ttW 

(M 
44*1. 
4401. 
440-'. 
mil 
41 4. 
4 Mb, 

44 0. 
4407. 
440* 
m ''. 
4110. 
4411. 



Nam s. 
Chae. Bake . 
Frank Cedent rom . 
Mr*. Verna Workman 
Henry stelloh . . . 
Wra. O Nell .... 
Dave W, Canon , . . 
Arthur J one* .... 
Richard H. Pent* 
John Huebner 
Henry Trowbridge , 
John D. McDonald . 
t>. W. Mo , re ... 
Mr*, i.ydla A. Atlaup . 
David H. Clark ... 
Thekla Schraitting . . 
1 .ustav En gel ... 
Mra. Marie Kneipp 
John Chrfstmann ... 
Mra, Annie G. Thorn pao 
Christiana Fly Rare . . 
Mra. Mary Mulligan . 
Frederick Waag (Dia.) 
Henry Danehower . . 
Win. Vanderfoid (OU.) 
James F. Harr .... 
Philip Pchr . . . 
A. Vanderveer Vorheea 
Win. Byrnea ..... 
Mra. Hahra Herfter . 
Mra. Klla Dail< y 
Mra Clyde GofT . . . 
Marvin Uabcock .... 

John Krouae 

George Lloyd (Dla.) . . 

TOtftl m ********* * 





, 1898. 


Union AM't. 


. 1 


JHO0O 


. 7 


200 00 


. U 


50 00 


45 


200 09 


as 


200 00 


. fta 


ato 00 


, ho 


w> 00 


. S3 


a» 00 


. 165 


200 00 


107 


aoooo 


. 176 


'200 00 


.14(1 


■200 00 


S57 


50 CO 


Mb 


200 CO 


'■n 


30 00 


309 


300 00 


SOU 


50 00 


340 


'200 00 


340 


50 CO 


. 3-10 


50 00 


. 842 


50 00 


87 1 


10t 00 


II 1 


50 00 


4'-7 


200 CO 


437 


200 00 


Wi 


200 00 


. 4UH 


200 00 


476 


200 00 


497 


50 00 


503 


25 00 


. 828 


60 00 


. 471 


50 00 


050 


50 00 


451 


400 00 


• ■ m 


. 94,925 00 



publish every known method, and 
if any reader has discovered, or ill' 
vented any method for obtaining lines 
and cuts that I do not possess, I will 
take It as a great favor if he will sub- 
mit the same to me for publication or 
for examination, for it may be that 
some bright, sharp workman has 
struck some very quick method for 
solving "Hopper and splay" work 
that is worthy ot perpetuation, and 
this condition can be brought about 
by the introduction of auch method 
into the columns of Carpenter. 
( Concluded. ) 



The Supreme Court of Colorado 
has decided the eight-hour city ordi- 
nance of Denver is constitutional. 

Chicago Bricklayers Union notified 
Commissioner of Public Works Mc- 
Gann not long since that members of 
the Union would hereafter protect the 
city's interests in all sewer and tunnel 
work. Union workmen will refuse to 
handle dry brick or material in 
public improvements which is not up 
to the specifications. 



FOR TAX, PINS AND BDPPLIK8. 

Daring the month ending December 81, 1898. 

s O. B.-T. 





52 20 
■22 HO 
(I 36 



mm* 

RECEIPTS, DECEMBER, 1898. 

From the Unions, Us, etc $6,341 39 

" Advertiser* 141 25 

* Rent 10 00 

" D. C. auppliea 8 00 

" subscriptions . 3 SO 

" C 1 £fl fal Ti C£ fi i**»«kaii«H>* 3 10 

" MtacelUBtoM 60 

Balance, December 1, 1888 ■ 20.889 18 

Total f27 175 00 

Total expense* 7,724 8S 

Cash balance, January 1, 1899 119.450 77 



DETAILED EXPENSES, DECEMBER, 1898. 
Printing 1 000 physician's certificates t 8 75 

1.000 claims for benefit ... 12 26 

M 1,000 stamped envelopes . . 1 25 

" 600 postals 1 50 

" f.00 password circular* . . 8 2f> 

" 10,000 membership cards . . 25 00 

40 200-page ledgers 44 SO 

" 10 400- page ledgers . . 30 00 
« 18,750 copies January C 4* p a k 

TBS. 465 00 

" extra tabular matter, general 

vote on Constitution ... 78 2i 

Composition of new Constitntlon ... 40 65 

Engravings for Carpbktbr .... 49 70 

Special writers for " » 00 

Press Clipping Bureau 6 00 

10 telegram* 2 82 

Kxpressage on supplies, etc 21 74 

Postage " " " 28 82 

1.000 stamped envelope* 21 80 

500 postal* 6 OQ 

Office rent for December 35 00 

Quarterly rent of P. O. box 3 00 

Salary and Clerk hire 843 10 

Tax to A. F, or L. for November . , SB 67 

One ton of coal ft 75 

One ash can 2 25 

Advertising commissions 100 00 

Rubber seals and deters 8 26 

Stationery and incidentals 1 50 

Janitor 1 50 

John Williams, to Batavla, N, Y. . . . 28 61 

D. F. Featherston; canvassing board . 30 00 

M, A. Maher, " " 30 00 

We*ley C. Hsll, " " 18 00 

S. J. Kent, postage, etc 3 50 

" - Delegate to A F. of L. . . 76 75 

O. E. Woodbury, . 101 60 

F, J . McGulre. . Ill 48 

H. Lloyd, " " " . . 18* 76 

D. C. of New York 600 00 

Newark, N, J 800 00 

Benefits No*. 4,878 to 4,411 4,836 00 

Total | 7,724 63 



7 16 

% 88 40 

8 22 70 

g 18 80 

10 — 168 HO 

H 42 20 

i 00 



19 20 
22 40 

18 3 80 

19 2K yfl 

00 
30 

4 00 
.1 00 
19 06 
33 75 

27 10 80 

38 8 40 

38 ttt 80 

30— 12 80 

81 20 00 

82 2* 40 

88 — 10ft 60 
84 14 20 

86 I 3D 

36 14 40 

87 5 00 

88 620 

89 H 00 

40 8 80 

41 18 75 

42 18 00 

«H 8H 00 

45 14 30 

46 10 00 

47 25 65 

48 2 00 

60 3 00 

61 60 4$ 

62 '20 00 

<£ 6 60 

54 25 90 

80 30 
I 80 

67 3 80 

7 40 



i 20 120 8 20 



105 84 20 217 $4 20 424 «8 40 

108 14 80. 218 15 00 427 84 CI 

107- 11 60 220 50 428 7 40 

109 19 75 221 5 00j 129 13 10 

110 17 30 

111 7 SO 

112 — 57 70 

114 10 40 

115 8 75 

118 2 70 

119 28 80 



M 



71 



451- 



10 433 14 60 

228 B 00 434 3 40 

325 4 60 437 5 40 

227 6 05 439 6 40 

228 10 00 440 — 12 20 

229 5 50! 442 :t 20 

230 8 00 444 7 40 

231 10 20 448 8 

282 2 40 

283 7 40 

234 10 75 

235 4 80 

238 4 00 

237 8 40 

238- 10 40 

239 15 10 487 

Ml 4 00 

242 12 80 

243 8 00 

244 4 06 

246 8 20 

247 21 20 



121 10 00 

122 10 40 

123 7 80 

124 7 20 

125 61 60 

126 6 60 

127 12 40 

120 B 40 

131 40 00 

183 16 20 

134 7 40 

135 17 30 

136 4 80 

187 6 80 

188 17 00 249 S 70 

140 « 40 251 9 00 

141 20 86 252 8 80 

142- 23 00 256 3 00 

143 2 90 258 6 66 

144 - 4 80 267 2 75 

147 10 80 268 18 OG 

148 87 60 259 9 40 

149 6 20 260 8 00 

150 9 40 261 1 00 

1*1 8 85 282 14 2. i 

152 3 40 283 10 00 

5 40 288 2 90 



187 2 00 

168 10 00 

159 4 00 

j eo — :n ho 
181 12 20 

163 6 80 

164 2 00 

186 6 30 

167 21 20 

168 14 00 

169 2H 00 

170 4 00 

171 11 00 

173 II 30 



80 11 30 178 3 40 

61 50 70 174 34 05 



75 175 



-St) 0". 



U to 
2« so 

18 30 

1 60 

■ 6 60 
- 9 00 

■ 9 

■ 8 80 
86 

71 00 
5 SO 
■IS 20 
4 00 
10 00 
21 25 
7 00 
IB 00 

2 40 
83 12 00 



178 21 20 

177 1R 80 

178 6 70 

179 17 70 

180 6 30 

181 w 20 

182 1 00 

183 6 00 

18 1 8 60 

188 2 40 

187 11 20 

4 20 



80 27 60 

93 6 90 

98 — 29 90 

94 5 00 

96 - 34 00 

97- <— 8 00 

98 48 80 

99 2 30 

101 4 00 



189 96 40 

190 7 20 

191 8 30 

193 7 30 

198 15 00 

194 2 20 

195 8 00 

4 50 11*6 4 40 

5 00 197 17 80 

700 

11 00 199 24 10 

2 80 303 19 40 

303 16 40 

308— 7 40 

207 18 10 

208 - 2 80 

209 10 00 

210 —16 40 

211 s» 40 

212 15 80 

21 
2 



7 40 

278 13 40 

274 15 00 

275 - 13 60 

288 14 20 

287 8 20 

388 5 80 

291 16 80 

296 2 80 

300 7 80 

804 11 00 

306— 10 00 

808 17 50 

309 — 18!) 60 

816 8 40 

816 2 80 

826- 8 80 

337 4 80 

828- 17 00 
382- 5 40 

338 20 40 

834 4 20 

340 77 40 

4 40 
10 40 

346 4 30 

849 12 40 

862 22 00 

855 40 3D 

859 15 80 

360 7 20 

381 35 95 

886 16 30 

870 4 80 

871 2 20 

874 30 35 

876—158 40 

881 — 18 30 

882 69 80 

891 8 20 

5 30 
8 60 
3 00 



30 15 
SB 30 

457 40 10 

460 3 20 

482 11 BO 

464 33 20 

4 40 

468 27 IS 

471 41 70 

478— 43 45 

474 4 20 

476 81 80 

478 42 40 

482 12 10 

488 27 00 

00 
80 

490 30 40 

493 21 60 

12 20 
ti 00 

807 7 60 

509 19 50 

518 84 40 

516 14 80 

621 IB 60 

522 IS 40 

526 3S 80 

634 4 00 

561 14 B0 

688—177 40 

564 12 45 

667 —26 30 

3 60 
6 80 

56 

688 14 40 

591 12 80 

693 2a 50 

598 b 60 

808 6 40 

808 4 80 

611 8 30 

612 8 40 

632 18 16 

688 4 00 

887 9 65 

688 8 43 

15 40 

4 90 



394- 



899- 

400 3 00 

7 80 
i 80 

407 12 20 

S 00 416 32 00' 786 4 40 

10 80 419 42 80 786 8 80 



860 5 80 

863 16 50 

668 4 80 

669 11 80 

687 8 10 

5 '20 



18 



6 00 
898 4 60 

898 8 06 

703 8 80 

707—12 30 

712 1 80 

714 8 40 

716 37 00 

718 2"2 00 

717 4 40 

728 II 00 

738 17 90 

789 2 80 

2 20 

760- IS 35 

757 4 30 

787- 



Total 



, 18,341 39 



The Building of a Semi-Spiral Stair- 
case. 



BY OWEN It MAG1NNIS 

DN writing this article for the 
benefit of those who rarely 
meet this class of work, I do 
so merely for the purpose of 
suggesting a method rather 
than a positive system. The problem 
is a most difficult and tedious one and 
requires much patience and thought. 

In commencing, I would refer the 
studious carpenter to the large dia- 
gram Fig i , where he will see the 
plan and projected elevation of a semi- 
spiral staircase, 16 feet In diameter, 
with an 8 foot radius for the outside 
string and a 4 foot radius for the in- 



plan as shown must be laid out on a 
floor the full size, or a portion, say 
half of it, may be laid down In order 
to obtain the exact sizes of the treads 
and risers. Now, to determine the 
exact shape of the twisted inside and 
outside strings, proceed as follows : 

Draw a straight line and on it with 
a big pair of compasses or a trammel 
rod, set off nine spaces each equal to 
the outside width of the tread from 1 
to 17. From these points raise up 
perpendiculars in the manner repre- 
sented at the top of Fig. 1. Divide 
the left band perpendicular into seven- 
teen spaces, each equal in height to 
the height of a riser, namely, 6# 
inches, and draw horizontal lines 
across to intersect with each perpen- 




Fig. i. —lay out of staircase. 



side string. There are eighteen risers 
In a height 10 feet from first floor to 
second floor, so that to determine the 
height of each riser, we do the follow- 
ing little arithmetic 5 

10 feet reduced to inches = 120 



120 divided by 18 = 6*/ 3 inches, or 
(>}{ Inches, so that there will be 
eighteen risers at 6 •„ inches. 

From these figures two pitch boards 
can be made as two will be required, 
namely, one for the outside string and 
one for the inside. That for the out- 
side string will be Been on the floor 
line A B between the projection dotted 
lines as X and that for the inside 
string will be seen at Y, between 8 
and 9 on the plan. Both pitches or 
rises are the same but the run diflers 
in width, the outside string being 18 
inches run and the inside 9 inches, 
giving a mean or average width on 
the tread or walking line of 13X 
Inches. 

In laying out this staircase, the 



dicular according to its number. By 
tracing a carved line from point to 
point, the exact shape of the string 
will be obtained. When working out 
this system of lines it is better to 
place three or four #-inch or #inch 
pine boards placed together on the 
floor edge to edge, and to lay out and 
draw the curves on these boards, 
keeping them together with thin hard- 
wood battens, or they may be cut to 
the curve with the compass saw or 
band saw and then battened together. 
It will be noticed that I publish no 
engraving with the foregoing descrip- 
tion, as the method of procedure is 
clearly shown above the line A B at 
Fig. 1 , where the reader will perceive 
I have found the exact elevation of 
both strings, risers and treads by carry- 
ing up the points from the plan below. 
These diagrams may be made sepa- 
rately or to scale. 

Concerning the construction ot 
twisted work of this class, I have 
found that the best practical method 
Is to build them up to the desired 
thickness in % or % inch thick- 
nesses of veneer reversing the grains 
so as to obtain the best safeguards 
against warping or working. If the 




Fig. met Hon OP lending inside 

STRING 



curves are sharp the pieces of veneer 
should be placed in a steam box and 
steamed till they are pliable, and then 
bent over a drum or mold constructed 
in the way represented at Fig. 2. 
Similarly Fig. 3 shows the bending 
of outside string. Kach strip of 
veneer should be bent, strip on strip, 
till entire thickness is bent, then 
when dry they should be taken off, 
heated in the hot box and glued to- 
gether. Clamps, hand screws, ceiling 
shores and wedges nhould be used 
liberally so as to get the veneers close 
together and in this way form the 
exact mold. 

Fig. 4 is the panelling to side on 
the outside string, if same be against 
a semi circular wall and the inside 
string be open. It is built up as be- 
fore and the panels are put in with 
points. 




Fig. 3.— mold for oitside string. 




Fig. 4.— elevation of panel wainscot. 



THE CARPENTER 



7 



Drawing Lesson. 



BY A W. WOODS 




OR our lesson this month we 
will take that of Isonietri- 
cal drawing. In architec- 
tural working drawings it 
is the custom of showing 
only one side of the object including 
projections on the sides, such as bay 
windows, porches, etc, and with all 
parts at a uniform scale, but in iao- 
nietrical drawings is shown three 
views at scale in a single figure with 
the lines of the respective sides 
parallel. 



as they recede from the eye appear to 
diminish in size and for that reason 
isometrical drawing is not well adapted 
for large work. 

Our illustration shows that of a 
carpenter's tool chest. The reader 
will notice that the end and side lines 
are drawn at an angle of 30 5 from the 
horizontal or 6o° from the perpendicu- 
lar Hues. Some other degree might 
be used, but the above gives about 
the beBt results, then again, angles 
are only to be had on the 45 and 
30" and 6o° slants, the latter two 
being the same only reversed. They 
may be had at most any first class 
book store or a 30 and 6o° angle can 



Padgett 'a Breezy Letter. 




Ficv. 1. 



This class of drawing Is useful in 
illustrating small objects, such as 
giving the dimensions of lumber, cut 
stone, furniture, etc., as it gives a 
much clearer idea at a glance of what 
is wanted than is given by the single 
e'evation of the different sides, and in 
most casea is quite as easily drawn, 
but for large objects the dimensions 
appear to be out of proportion, which 
Is caused by the absence of vanishing 
points, and consequently no fixed 
point of sight as in the common per- 
spective. 




Owing to the laws of sight, objects 



be easily made, as it is equal to one- 
half of an equilateral triangle and 
can be laid out as shown in Fig. 2. 
Lay out the diagram at any desired 
size on a piece of hard wood about J of 
an inch in thickness and dress to the 
lines as shown. 

In our next lesson we will continue 
this subject with further illustrations, 
also that of cabinet perspective show- 
ing the difference between the two. 

The "New York City Carpenters » 
is the title of a narrow, isolated, inde- 
pendent local organization in Gotham, 
recently made up of a combination of 
the K. of L. carpenters, known as the 
" Progressives " and of a small fac- 
tion of what was the " United Order 
Carpenters." These impracticables 
want " to build a wall around New York 
city," but are not in position to carry 
out that exclusive plan. They how- 
ever, admit members for any initiation 
fee at all and are not over particular 
as to enforcing the Union scale of 
wages. Our New York Unions are now 
engaged in a contest against these 
disturbers of trade unity. 



Editor of The Carpenter : 

" There is a maxim in Hie school* 
That flattery is the food of fools " 

Johnnie Bull, in November Car- 
penter, touched my vanity by re- 
ferring to me as an "expert." I may 
tell you (in strict confidence) that I 
know better, if he don't. But my 
feelings are touched ; and, disregard- 
ing the fate of the frog whose ideas 
of expansion were on a par with those 
of some people whom I have heard 
advocate spreading the United States 
over the rest of the earth, I will fire 
in all directions, as usual. And, if I 
fall too far short of the mark, kindly 
bestow at least a portion of the blame 
on him who incited me. To one of 
my tender years, it Is a serious thing 
to be overrated, the more so when my 
untaught efforts may appear in the 
same Issue with articles by men who 
really are experts, men whose ample 
mechanical bumps seem to have been 
supplemented by professional expe- 
rience as architects and contributors, 
besides " book lam in' " in plenty. 

So please caution your readers not 
to do it again, Mr. Editor. "Just 
tell them " that, far from pretending 
to expertnesa, 1 am but the voice of 
one crying in ignorance, hungering 
and thirsting for truths— and the 
zvkvs. That is something funny about 
me, must have the whys or I can't 
progress. Kind Nature dealt gen- 
erously by me in some respects (feet, 
for instance) ; but she entirely omitted 
my monkey bump. I cannot ape. I 
was always a great hand to ask ques- 
tions ; so much so that, when I was 
knee-breeches size, my mother became 
apprehensive lest I would grow up 
crooked, like this (?). Sometimes I 
feel resentful toward Nature for the 
omission aforesaid, because it leaves 
one under certain disadvantages. 
Thus, he is generally on the less 
popular side of a new question; he 
can get neither his politics nor his 
religion from the dally papers ; and, 
when they try to "work" public 
sentiment in behalf of some fraud or 
other, as likely as not he takes the 
other track, and absolutely declines 
to be enthused. And then, in 
mechanical work, he is slower than 
the superficial man, the one who still 
retains the more prominent traits of 
his prehensile ancestry. There is a 
man in one of the St. Louis Locals, 
whom nature designed for a philoso- 
pher ; he is a reasoner ; good mechanic, 
too, but he cannot do enough to suit 
some foremen. Then, there is— but 
I had better "mosey back" to that 
board messure, it keeps bobbing 
up one way or another, and I am 
glad it does, because it shows that 
Mr. Wood's articles get the close 
attention of which they are worthy. 
Like any other man, Mr. W. has a 
right to put his own construction on 
his ambiguities, real or seeming. In 
"figuring " a board it is no trick to 
get the integral square feet, and the 
practical value of a process depends 
much on the accuracy and speed with 
which the fraction is obtained. So I 
said, and atill say, that the process is 
interesting. The pencil is preferable 
in practice as it is much quicker and 
gives accurate results. The fractional 
in question is about 9 P« cent. 



as I remember it, remarkably close 
for such a method. 

This brings to mind another of 
those disadvantages consequent to 
having greatness thrust upon you. 
My diagrams are not critically viewed. 
I'm so "expert," you know, 'tisn't 
worth while ; yet I blundered in 
tower- framing, Fig. 2. page 13, May 
Carpenter, where I said make 
H J =G. t, should be H f.**. H I. 
The whys were omitted to save space ; 
therefore the error was not easily seen 
by the reader. 

I like to see appreciation expressed 
for The Carpenter. It Is well earned. 
Even where on" is paid cash fordoing 
his part, that doesn't discharge our 
whole obligation to the well doer. 
An editor isn't insensible to a heart- 
felt "thank you," and it should be 
given when merited as a matter of 
honesty. Among other good things 
spread in the November Carpenter, 
I like the fatherly, practical, sensible 
articles by Mr. LerEngwell. They are 
rather more than we might expect iu a 
trade journal, a trifle out of place some 
may think, but I'm grateful for the 
dislocation. But he says, " Try to be 
somebody and you will succeed "How 
does he know but what we are already 
"somebody?" Try ! How ? Don't 
we spend our leisure (for instance) 
like we are somebody ? People who 
are just ' trying to be somebody ' read, 
study, think every chance they get, 
but most of us just "gab," can or do 
play cards or checkers when we have 
spare moments. Guess I know what 
I'm talking about, for wasn't I up in 
the "reading room " of our District 
Council one day and there saw twenty- 
two men playing cards in tobacco 
smoke thick enough to cut, while two 
others were arguing something about 
"taxation"? Mr. L. might have seen 
with one eye (through a crack in the 
smoke) what fraction of that sample 
gathering felt the need of being 
somebody. Come again, Mr. L , but 
don't put It quite so fiat, for though 
some of us may not be much "pump- 
kins " we don't want the neighbors to 
know it ; moreover, naked truth our 
modesty offends. 

Earl Padgett. 
Union 2$7 V St. Louis, Mo. 



A Closet Around a Wash Basin. 



The above sketch shows a very 
handy arrangement for going round 
a wash basin, where the space or room 
is big -enough to allow it to go in, and 
any of the carpenters can make it at 
home. On each side of the wash 



□ 

E 



0" 



basin and plumbing are three drawers, 
and a door covers the plumbing in the 
centre ; a solid board partition # 
thick should separate the 
and plumbing on both sides. 



A Monthly Journal for Carpenters, Stair Builders, Machine Wood Workers, Planing Mill Men, and Kindred Interests. 



VOL. XIX.-No. 2. ) 
Established 1881. J 



PHILADELPHIA, FEBRUARY, 1800. 



I Fifty Cents Psr Year. 
\ Single Copies, 6 Cts. 



Henry Disston & Sons, 



ESTABLISHED 1840. 



KEYSTONE 

* Philadelphia, pa., u. s. a. * $AW, TOOL, STEEL AND FILE WORKS, 

SAWS, PILES AMD TOOLS FOR THE MARKETS OF THE WORLD. 

No. 12 Hand Saw. 




Our Saws have all the Latest Improvements, and are warranted superior to all others . 

They have no rival in quality, finish, and general utility, and are made from the beat steel, and of superior temper. The grinding, by our New ggj 
Improved Machinery, in use only hy us, makes them the easiest running Saw* in the world. They have gained a universal reputation among mechanics, 
ana are sold by all the prominent Wholesale and Retail Hardware Dealers in America and Europe. The manufactures of this firm have secured ' 
i at all the World's Great Fairs, where they have been exhibited. 

And we Guarantee a Better Article, at the same Price, than any other House In the World. 

ALL, OOO D8 BEARING OUR NAME ABB FOLLY WASH ANTED 



the highest 



TAINTOR 
POSITIVE 
SAW SET 



«f thla foal 



bm M 4, and the? 
to highly «*mmw<«l by 
' /ho a** the*. 




It jmar Hardware De»L 
*r deea not handle them, 
don't take en Inferior let 
beuu.c Mm* **• aaya. 

'lt'« Jo*t m good." 

TAINTOR MFG. CO. 

9 la 15 MURRAY ST. 

NEW VOlm. 




FOR SALE BY DE 



PRACTICALLY 

UNBREAKABLE 1 

Says the World's Fair Award 

niML'i-.nmiHrigiSMtmvf'irr 




THE ONLY ABSOLUTELY NOISELESS 
DOOR HANGER ON THE MARKET... 



For Bottom Prices 
Mention this Paper 



The McCabe Parlor 
Door Hanger, No. a 



The McCabe Hanger Manufacturing Co. 

532 W 22d Strwt «■ Y. City. 



I 



aT>v 



'•TRU£ AS A DIE.** 

WROUGHT STEEL LOCKS 



.Str 




OROIDE FINISH 

cmg, Durable, Inexpensive 

For Sale by all Hardware Dealers 

Carpenters will appieciate the fact that the 
measurements of these locks are and Must be 
exact, as true as p die cm make them. No 
trouble and vexation in fitting .... 

Catalogue of Wrought Steel Look, end Lock 
■eta, on application 

L 6, ERWIN M'F'G CO. 

Now York. 




UNION CARPENTERS ASK FOR- 



NEWBURGH, KEYSTONE, UNION-MADE 

Overalls, Coats, Pants - Carpenters' Aprons 



Your dealer will gladly 
furnish you these ex- 
cellent goods if you ask 
for them. 



Cut, 

Made, 

Sold, 



Right. 



CLEVELAND & WHITEHILL CO. 



MOORE'S 

IMPROVED WROUGHT STEEL STORM 
WINDOW FASTENERS 




With these fasteners, storm windows can 
be adjusted more easily, and held, in plan 
more securely, than in any other way yet 
invented^ 

NO LADDER REQUIRED. 

Fastened from the inside, the only tool 
necessary being a small * 



The Stanley Works, m 

NbW BRITAIN, CONN. 

7p Chambers St., N. Yi 



THE CARPENTER. 



HIGH GRADE MACHINERY 




FOR 



CARPENTERS, BUILDERS, SASH. 
DOOR, BLIND MAKERS, ETC. 



No, 1, Vabibty Wood Woikee. 
A most valuable rusehlne fur «'nrpeniers, 
Builders, Sash. Door and Blind Makers. «tc, 
a* on It you can perform n variety of work 
which would otherwise require the use of 
•ever*] machines. 



cheer fully 

Ask far ••Wood Worker" Catalogue 

J. A. Fay & Co., 

— SM-534 W. Front St., 
CINCINNATI, OHIO. 



STANDARD WOOD WORKING MACHINERY 




OF EVERY DESCRIPTION. 



IT In need of aiiytulnSj 
Agar* With yon, a* w» 
you 



3t2 



Mtaloguo free If yoi 
■M for II 



So. 2. Plankk, Ma Ten (tit AWD MoULIxtB. 
Planes, one side, 24 inches wld« by Q Indies 
thick. 

Matches 12 Inches wide; 
Kn Invaluable machine for a small or medluas 

•lied shop. 



The Egan Company. 



406-4316 W. Front Street, 

^ CINCINNATI, O 




FOOT 4 HAND POWER MACHINERY 

COMPLETE OUTFITS. 
Carpenters and Builders without steam power 
can successlully compete with tHe large shops 
by using our New Labor Saving flathlnery. 

Machine. Sold ON TRIAL. Catalogue Fsee. 

SENECA FALLS MFG. CO. 

ai Water St., Seneca Falls, N. V., U. S A 




THE LATEST AND BEST. 




OUR NO. 141 
UPRI GHT MOU LDER 

Cutters can be kept low on 
spindles at all times. 

Spindles are of best cruci- 
ble steel, with taper bear- 
■n^-top and bottom -and 
run in phosphor bronze box- 
es, the upper boxes being of 
the "fountain" type, supply- 
ing a ronlmual flow of oil 
over all parts of the bearing. 

Write us for further infor- 
mation, also for new cata- 
logue, 

S. i. WOODS MACHINE CO. 

South Boston. Mass. 




THE SQUARE ROOT 
DELINEATOR 

OR, KEY TO THE STEEL SQUARE. 

BY A.W. WOODS, 

GIVES M PLAIN FlGUffiS THE IENCTN*. 
F?um, fflSES. PITCH, OEG$E£4, CUTS AM 

bevels ro/f even aho 1/Nmn prmx± 

HOPFtf? CUTS, BMW MEASURE 

Sent post paid. Price $1.00 
jt^THE CARPENTER. pjg^J 



JlARTEN DOSCHER 

MANUFACTURE.!! SAUOATUCK, CONN. 

CARPENTERS' BENCH AND MOULDING 

PLANES 

Hand Made. 



We Make 'em, Yon Want 'em 

If you are a carpenter, 
a contractor, a lumber 
dealer, a real estate 
agent, or if you are 
going to build a house, 
send 5 cents for Hicks' 
Illustrated Catalogue 
of artistic designs. . . 



I. P. HICKS 



.17 Stat on A 

umaua, Nm. 




HANDLES, 

MALLETS, &c. 



AO* rou* HAmowAmm ommumm »oa> 

DOSCHER'S PLANES 




Tka Isr.Mtsad moat 
• amplntaltisa*! Wao4 

ALLEN B. RORKE 

Builder -m 

Contractor 



tars and Jalner. ufl 
Wood-workara 

Wood WtrkUg 
MacLuis 0«. 



F H. Clement do., o Ian for. 
Mrb. Uo Ltd.. (joooell A 
Waters, Hoyt A Bra, Co., 
The Levi Houston (Jo , 
Lehman If ch Oo , MUnao- 
kM Sander Mlfe. Co., C. B. 
Betters * Co., Rowley A 



TOWER & LYON, MKlWff 

Manufacturers of nn TT1ITt.MS|iiiil fs 

FINE TOOLS. 

Chaplin's Pat. Planes 



Herman OS Co., William. 
D0rtsI01i.Ce.. Tooo f Bros. 

oomsnd state roar reaulre- 



fni York 



Offices i — 



..-.PHILADELPHIA 




Kohbfr Handle* or 
Wood Handles. 

LEVER ADJUSTMENT. 
TOWER'S CHAMPION SCREW DRIVERS, 

Tested Twiigb Tsicpif, Bol Id Tanked Bolster. Hasty Kail Fsrnl*. Flnud Bandit 

1MIT*TI»*». 



r— tH- 




CHAMPION I. M «ufe blade. 



Sworn Circulation of THE CARPENTER 

19,006 COPIES MONTHLY 

Best Advertising Medium for Tool Manufacturers, Wood 
Working Machinery, Hardware, Lumber and Building 
Material!. Also of Special Advantage to Contractors, 
Architects and Business Men. 




Satisfaction 

is given all around when the house fs 
trimmed with Sargent's Hardware. The 
Architect is pleased because he speci- 
fied it ; the owner is pleased each time 
he looks at the trimmings because they 
add so much to the beauty of the home, 
and everybody is pleased with the work- 
ing of Sargent's Easy Spring Locks. 



1 



V U«i,B. 



Sargent & Company, 

Maker* of Artistic Hardware and Fine 
New York ; and N«w Itavaa, Com. 



i 



■ 





\^>^Mt^<\ —— 




A Monthly Journal for Carpenters, Stair Builders, Machine Wood Workers, Planing Mill Men, and Kindred Interests. 



V E?t L ab^7 8 °8K- } PHILADELPHIA, FEBRUARY, 1899. { S^f^^ST." 




(jVY ALLOW A V has been thrice re- 
jected from membership in Union 55, 
Denver, Col. 

Jt 

P. CAVAMAOH, formerly of Union 
509, now a member of Union 64, New 
York City, accused of being a defaulter, 
has had his case investigated by the 
D. C. of New York The charges have 
been found untrue. 

J* 

\V1u.iA\1 Ckak., formerly of Union 
170, Bridgeport, O., is a slick fraud 
He skipped that town leaving numer- 
ous creditors and indebted to several 
Union members Jle is ^ feet to inches 
high, black hair and black eyes, and 
claims to be a stair builder, carver 
artist and photographer. 

«* 

Aw member or I/>cal having 
copies of Thk CAKCKNTKit for De- 
cember, 1 81 <7, will confer a favor by 
sending two or three of them to this 
Ollice. 

Local Unions and District Coun- 
cils should amend their Hy Laws and 
rules to conform to the new Constitu- 
tion. See Sections 4S and v, on that 
score 

1'k<k KJ-niM .s of Jan u. ry session of 
(i. 1-;. H. will appear in our next 
issue. 

J* 

NEW Constitutions, Knglish and 
(•erman, are now ready. Five dollars 
per hundred. Send in your orders 
with the cash to the li. S.-T, 




wii i iam Oirprra, (intuB WT, Attains, Oa., 
lot misR[)i»r«i)ititUoti or fmii[«i 

IJAVi.i MtCBAVD, Union rl, Sou Knancisco, 
C«l,, fijf ai-rious TtolBllonB of trade rule* and 
genera] bod conduct. 

J. 

J..HN NKBSWKNliKH, V'UIOU 171, J illel, III., 

for slander ao<1 couducl uubecjitiirig a rniun 



Present Prosperous Condition (if the 
United Brotherhood. 



For the ilrst winter in ovtr five 
years, since the industrial crisis has 
been fully under way, we can safely 
report a larger percentage of the 
membership at work all over the 
country, though work in the larger 
cities still keeps flat on account of 
the changes in building construc- 
tion. 

The prospects for theenming spring 
are exceedingly bright, and numerous 
trade movements among car j tenters 
for the eight-hour day are reported to 
this office -a greater number than we 
have known in several years. 

Our net membership in good stand- 
ing since last August to date has not 
varied one hundred in the aggregate, 
where even in the best of times, 
during November, December and 
Jaiuary, we usually su tiered a loss of 
ten to fifteen per cent, in member- 
ship. This evidences our member- 
ship is less fluctuating and has 
become more stable and permanent. 

We now have over 400 Unions and 
1.600 members in good standing and 
benefit, and our cash balance at end 
of this month will be fully 5 2,000 
more than it was last September 
during the convention. 



Trade Movements Among Carpen- 
ters, 



The eight-hour day and a code of 
trade rules will be established this 
season in Jersey City, N. J.; Trenton, 
N J ; Seattle. Wash.; New Rochelle, 
N Y ; Kllzabeth. N. J ; Indianapolis, 
Ind ; Scranton, Pa : Des Moines, la.; 
and Springfield, 111. 

On January a;th, Union 264, 
Boulder, Colo., established the eight- 
hour day and Union rules. 

The nine-hour day and Union rules 
will be enforced this spring in Peck- 
ville, Pa ; Cleburne, Tex,; Jackson, 
Tenn : Moline, 111., and St. Joseph, 
Mo.; and in Torrington, Conn , and 
Cambridge, i >., the nine-hour day was 
established recently. 

Union 146, Schenectady, N. Y., has 
adopted the rule not to work with 
non Union men. 

Racine, Wis.; Zanesville, <>; Pas 
saic, X. J; Perth Anib=>y, N. J; 
Muncle, Ind ; Amsterdam, N. Y ; 
Keewanee, III,; Springfield, Mass ; 
Minneapolis, Minn.; and Troy, N. Y ; 
are arranging movements to secure 
stringent observance of the nine hour 
day and a standard scale of wages. 




Mi: urn is, Tenn. — A committee of 
Union 394 waited on the Tennessee 
Brewing Company and had the Cole 
Manufacturing Company unionize 
their plant, where they were making 
bar fixtures. The result is an addi- 
tion of thirty two new members last 
month. 

J* 

Champaign, 111,— The Illinois Cen- 
tral Railroad Company has just com- 
pleted a new depot. Several weeks 
ago the Union men, through Union 
II, made a stand against the employ- 
ment of non-Union men and won the 
issue. 

Detroit, Mich — Union 19 is en- 
forcing the rule of five dollars Initiation 
fee. The German Union has gone 
over to the Socialists, and is barred 
from e\ ery central body. Prospects 
of work good, on account of Bl-centen- 
taiy in I9QI, We have a committee 
out negotiating with the bosses. 

«* 

BraiANAN -V Lvau., Brooklyn, 
N. Y,, have agreed to hire none but 
Union carpenters at $3 15 per day for 
eight hours work, 

J* 

Con mhi s, O —President Frank 
Western! an, of Union 6t, was recently 
tried in the police courts for violation 
of the Anti Trust law, and was ac- 
quitted. The charges were preferred 
by notorious scabs with whom Bro. 
Westenu an ami other Union men re- 
fused to work. 

•f* 

Rock Isi.ano, 111.- -Frank Mix- 
ture, manager of the Rock Island 
Stove Company, and cne of the largest 
stockholders, has had his $d,o<in 
house built by scab labor. He op- 
posed the committee of Union 166 
that waited on him. The Riverside 
cooking and heating stoves are made 
by this firm and sell very largely 
west of the Mississippi. Our mem- 
bers and friends can do without them. 
J* 

C01.1 mi:i s. I). — Nelson Morris & 
Co , meat packers, Chicago, erected 
a cold storage bouse in this city 
and the work was done by a notorious 
non-Union firm despite all our ap- 
peals to the firm 



Rochester, N. Y. — The firm ol 
Leon I.empert and Son, special de- 
signers of opera houses and music 
halls had charge of the Opera House 
job here -has broken every promise 
made to organized labor In this city. 
Wherever this firm goes it should be 
branded as unfair. 

J* 

Zanesvim.e, O.— The S. A. Weller 
Company, potters, after a long contest 
against organized labor, lately signed 
an agreement satisfactory to the 
Unions of this city. 

J* 

PiTTsiiR'-., Pa.— The Carpenters 
l nions of this city are making an 
aggressive campaign to enlist the 
support of non -Union men to enforce 
higher wages and stricter trade rules 
this coming spring. Public meetings 
have been held and a circular to the 
trade was issued and with splendid 
results. 

Ottvmwa, Iowa. — At a recent pub- 
He meeting of Union 767, a large 
number of contractors attended and 
expressed their support. 

«fi 

Com .uiu s.O. — Union '<i has under- 
taken an active movement against 
contract work at the U S. barracks 
buildings and is urging the day's 
work plan. 



Nine New Unions. 

Charters have been granted the past 
month to : Unions 49, Lowell, Mass.; 
IjO, Hancock. Mich.; 263, St. 
Albans, Yt.; 2<>.i, Boulder, Colo., 
and 1 38, Kansas City, Kan. (The 
latter is a consolidation of Unions 107 
and 180 of Kansas City, Kan.) Also 
to Unions 145, Sayre, Pa. ; 
Helena, Mont.; 201, Wichita, Kan., 
and 204, CoiTten, Hi, 



No More Arrears Notices. 



Under the newly amended Consti- 
tution now In force, no arrears no- 
tices need hereafter be sent by the 
F. S., as formerly, to members two 
months in arrears. That is dispensed 
with. See Section 89 (a) of Constitu- 
tion on that point. 



Mayor Jones, of Toledo, O., has 
put an eight hour day Into effect for 
the police force instead of twelve hoars, 
and without increased cost to the tax 
payers, and has adopted the same 
system on all city public work. 



THE CARPENTER. 



H10H GRADE MACHINERY 




FOR 



CARPENTERS, BUILDERS, 8ASH. 
DOOR, BUND MAKERS, ETC. 



STANDARD WOOD WORKING MACHINERY 




No. S Variitv Wood Wcbkii. 
A most valuable maohlne fur <"arpenterB, 
Bui Idem, Buh, Door and Blind Makers, etc, 
a* on It yon can perform a variety ol work 
which would otherwise require the use of 
several machine*. 



J. A. Fay & Co., 

j- 1 §§4 W. Front St., 
CINCINNATI. OHIO. 




FOOT 4 HAND POWER MACHINERY 

COMPLETE OUTFITS. 
Carpenter* and Builder* without strain power 
can success fully compete with the large *hopa 
by using our New Labor Saving flaihlnery. 

Machines Solo ON TRIAL. Catmooui Fail. 

SENECA FALLS MFG. CO. 

M Water St., Seneca Pal Is. N. V., U. 8. A. 



THE LATEST AND BEST. 





141 



Cutters can be kept low on 
spindles at all times. 

Spindles are of best cruci- 
ble steel, with taper bear- 
ings—top and bottom— and 
run in phosphor bronze box- 
es, the upper boxes being of 
the "fountain" type, supply- 
ing a continual flow of oil 
over nil parts of the bearing. 

Write us for further infor- 
mation, also for new cata- 
logue. 

S. 1. WOODS MACHINE CO. 

South Boston, 



riARTEN DOSCHER 

MANUFACTURER SAUGATUCK, CONN. 

CARPENTERS' BENCH AND MOULDING 

PLANES 

Hand Made. 



handles, 

MALLETS, &c. 



DOSCHER'S PLANES 



TOWER & LYON, 



9fi Chambers St root, 
NEW YORK. 

Manufacturer* ol 

FINE TOOLS. 

Chaplin's Pat. Planes 

Corrugated Face or Smooth 

BbbMT H»»dle« or 
Wood Handles. 

LEVER ADJUSTMENT. 
TOWER'S CHAMPION SCREW DRIVERS, 

■.parisl Steal. Tsetsd Tonrb T.mp.r. Bolld Tant.d Bol.tar, Hsatt Msll Psruls, Fhud Handl. 

B1W aHB Of HI1TATIO**. 





Sworn Circulation of THE CARPENTER 

19,006 COPIES MONTHLY 

Beit Advertising: Medium for Tool Manufacturers, Wood 
Working Machinery, Hardware, Lumber and Building 
Materials, Also of Special Advantage to Contractors, 
Architects and Business Men. 




OF EVERY DESCRIPTION. 



If In need of aoythlaaj bi *>or 

figure with j on, a* we aaua ami 
save you money. 

niustrattd 312 pas* tatalofua 
have flood us* for rt 



*.t* 



froa If yai 



No. J. Pr^««a, Match»h a»d Mould 
Places, one aide, » in dies wide by « 
thick. 

Matches 13 Inches wide; 
in invaluable machine for a small or 
alaed shop. 



The Egan Company, 

406-436 W. Front Street, 
-m 



■pp« (Rap 

18 OY 28 INCHES. 

Sl^PlE. PrJAeTlWL 

^\L!j/\BLE. 
Price- 

P ost Pap, 
1 1 1 1 ■ ■ 




THE SQUARE ROOT 
DELINEATOR 

OR KEY TO THE STEEL SQUARE. 

BY A.W. WOODS, 

GIVES IN PLAIN FIGURES THE LENCTH, 
ffUHS, fflSES, PITCH, OE&fEES, ffi/TS AM 

bevels f&f even aho uneven prme^ 

HOPPER CUTS, BOARD MEASURE EK\ 
5£NT POST PAID. PrllCE. $1.00 

™ E CARPENTER. p^DtL/m.r* 



We Hake 'em, Yen Want 'en 



If you are a carpenter, 
a contractor, a lumber 
dealer, a real estate 
agent, or if you are 
going to build a house, 
send 5 cents for Hicks' 
Illustrated Catalogue 
of artistic designs. . . 



I. P. HICKS 



» atatlon A 
Omaha, Nub 




The i *<-*•** tud do oat 
_ ,_ MBaaOete 11a* ef Weod- 
/"T wereln* tJaahlseiy Im 
/L \ f \ Ik* wcrld for Otrpea- 
/ j(h— — | **r» and JeLners sad 
k^Sf^yyFj Woad-workin fjener- 

^WP^J* AmsrUen Wood Wsrklsg 

W rot 1 —iu« re 


ALLEN B. RORKE 


Builder us 




T* m ?r i al'^ fefch. Oo . Ltd., Qoedsl) A 
WdJlf/ Watara, Hoyl * Bro Co., 
JSPmf^Fi Ttaa Levi Houston Co , 
1 \*>jaaa7* Lahmao sfeb do , Mliwaa 

j^^^QNtb ^"'»i*cK*Oo < "^Y ooBg " JBroa. 


Contractor 


Office* 1— 


PhiUdelphis Bourse, 


Ad drew aaareet **J*eMona and stale your rwmlr*- 
■watt: lOtrJberrrBt, Nt-w Tork *£ B. Canal 81 , 
ClilMfa. M Pearl m , Boetoo Cbnrcb and Basin 
nta rwilllaaajport Fa. 


— PHILADELPHIA 




Satisfaction 



V Design. 



fs given all around when the house Is 
trimmed with Sargent's Hardware. The 
Architect is pleased because he speci- 
fied it ; the owner is pleased each time 
he looks at the trimmir^s because they 
add so much to the beauty of the home, 
and everybody is pleaded with the work- 
ing of Sargent's Easy Spring Locks. 

Sargent & Company, 

M*k«rt of Artistic Hardware and Fiat 
New York ; sod New Hmii, 



i 




A Monthly Journal for Carpenters, Stair Builders, Machine Wood Workers, Planing Mill Men, and Kindred Interests. 



} PHILADELPHIA. FEBRUARY, 1899. { W^^SSl 




Present Prosperous Condition of the 
United Brotherhood. 



Guv Allowav has been thrice re- 
jected from membership in Union 55, 
Denver, Col. 

P. CAVANAOM, formerly of Union 
509, now a member of Unior << \, New 
York City, accused of being a defaulter 
has bad bis case investigated by the 
D. C. of New York. The charges have 
been found untrue. 



Wji.uam Ckak,, formerly of Union 
170, Bridgeport, <),, is a slick fraud 
He skipped that town leaving numer- 
ous creditors and indebted to several 
Union members. He is 5 feet 10 inches 
high, black hair and black eyes, and 
claims to be a stair builder, carver, 
artist and photographer. 



Anv member or Local having 
pies of Tuk C.AKi KNTEti for De- 
mber, 1697, will confer a favor by 
ndlng two or three ot them to this 

ice, 

J* 

LOCAL Unions and District Coun- 
11s should amend their By Laws and 
ule.i to conform to the new Constitu- 
lon. See Sections 48 and 49 on that 
core 




Pfcr lii: ihn'i.s of January session of 
G. E. B. will appear in our next 
issue. 



New Constitutions, English and 
German, are now ready. Five dollars 
per hundred. Send in your orders 
with the cash to the G. S.T. 



William C.Rii'FITH. Ifiiliin 1^7 . Atlanta, U.n,, 
lor uii»at>|irotirliUlou of lundn. 

1>*VI1J meiitlj Union 29, San Frnncltfco, 
Cal., fjr aerioun violation! of trade rule* and 
general had conduct. 

Jdhh Nkihvvbnihi*, Union 171, Jillel, III,, 
lor Minder and conduct unbecoming a Union 



For the first winter in ovtr five 
years, since the industrial crisis has 
been fully tinder way, we can safely 
report a larger percentage of the 
membership at work all over the 
countiy, though work in the larger 
cities still keeps flat on account of 
the changes in building construc- 
tion. 

The prospects for the coming spring 
are exceedingly bright, and numerous 
trade movements among carpenters 
for l he eight-hour day are reported to 
this office— a greater number than we 
have known in several years 

Our net membership in good stand- 
ing since last August to date has not 
varied one hundred in the aggregate, 
where even in the best of times, 
during November, December and 
January, we usually suffered a loss of 
ten to fifteen per cent, in member- 
ship, This evidences our member- 
ship Is less fluctuating and has 
become more stable and permanent. 

We now have over 400 Unions and 
31,600 members in good standing and 
benefit, and our cash balance at end 
of this month will be fully $2,000 
more than it was last September 
during the convention. 



Trade Movements Among Carpen- 
ters. 



The eight-hour day and a code ot 
trade rules will be established this 
season in Jersey City, N. J-; Trenton, 
N. J ; Seattle, Wash.; New Kochelle, 
N Y ; KHzabeth, N, J ; Indianapolis, 
Ind ; Scranton, Pa : Des Moines, la.; 
and Springfield, 111. 

On January 27th, Union 264, 
Boulder, Colo., established the eight - 
hour day and Union rules. 

The nine- hour day and Union rules 
will be enforced this spring in Peck- 
ville. Pa ; Cleburne, Tex ; Jackson, 
Tenn ; Moline, 111,, and St. Joseph, 
Mo.; and in Torrlngton, Co* a , and 
Cambridge, (),, the nine-hour day was 
established recently. 

Union 146, Schenectady, N, Y., has 
adopted the rule not to work with 
non Union men. 

Racine, Wis.; Xanesville, < > ; Pas- 
saic, N. J ; Perth Atnboy, N. J ; 
M uncle, Ind ; Amsterdam, N. Y ; 
Keewanee, III.; Springfield, Mass: 
Minneapolis, Minn.; and Troy, N. Y ; 
are arranging movements to secure 
stringent observ.nce of tb> nine hour 
day and a standard scale of wages. 




Mi; m i'n is, Tenn.— A oommittee of 
Union 39 t waited on the Tennessee 
Hrewiug Company and had the Cole 
Manufacturing Company unionize 
their plant, where they were making 
bar fixtures. The result is an addi- 
tion of thirty two new members last 
month. 

J* 

CHAMPAIGN, 111.— The Illinois Cen- 
tral Railroad Company has just com- 
pleted ;i new depot. Several weeks 
ago the t'nion men, through Union 
t ! , made a stand against the employ- 
ment of non-1 nion men and won the 
issue. 

^* 

Detroit, Mich.— Union 19 is en- 
forci ng the rule of fi ve dollars Initiation 
fee. The German Union has gone 
over to the Socialists, and is bar-ed 
from every central body. Prospects 
of work good, on account of IL-centen- 
tary in 1901, We have a committee 
out negotiating with the bosses. 

J* 

Buchanan A: Lyall, Brooklyn, 
N. Y., have agreed to hire none but 
Union carpenters at $3 25 per day for 
eight hours work. 

Coum nus, O— President Frank 
Westerman, of Union 61, was recently 
tried in the police courts for violation 
of the Anti Trust law, and was ac- 
quitted. The charges were preferred 
by notorious scabs with whom Bro. 
Westerman and other Union men re- 
fused to work. 

a* 

Rock Island, III.— Frank Mix- 
ture, manager of the Rock Island 
Stove Company, and one of the largest 
stockholders, has had his $6,000 
house built by scab labor. He op- 
posed the committee of Union 166 
that waited on him. The Riverside 
cooking and heating stoves are made 
by this firm find sell very largely 
west of the Mississippi. Our mem- 
bers and friends can do without them. 
J* 

Con Mm s, O.— Nelson Morris ft 
Co , meat packers, Chicago, erected 
a cold storage house in this city 
and the work was done by a notorious 
non-Union firm despite all our ap- 
peals to the firm, 



Rochester, N. Y.— The firm ot 
Leon Lempert and Son, special de- 
signers of opera houses and music 
halls had charge of the Opera House 
job here — has broken every promise 
made to organized labor In this city. 
Wherever this firm goes it should be 
branded as unfair. 

Zanesville, O.— The S. A. Weller 
Company, potters, after a long contest 
against organized labor, lately signed 
an agreement satisfactory to the 
Unions of this city. 

J* 

PiTTsi'URG, Pa.— The Carpenters 
Unions of thi3 city are making an 
aggressive campaign to enlist the 
support of non-Union men to enforce 
higher wages and stricter trade rules 
this coming spring. Public meetings 
ha-, e been held and a circular to the 
trade was Issued and with splendid 
results. 

OTTUMWA, Iowa.— At a recent pub- 
lic meeting of Union 767, a large 
number of contractors attended and 
expressed their support. 

J» 

Columbus, O. — Union 61 has under- 
taken an active movement against 
contract work at the U S. barracks 
buildings and Is urging the day's 
work plan. 



Nine New Unions. 

Charters have been granted the past 
month to: Unions 49, Lowell, Mass.; 
130, Hancock. Mich. ; 263, St. 
Albans, Vtj 264, Boulder, Colo., 
and 138, Kansas City, Kan. (The 
latter is a consolidation of Unions 107 
and 180 of Kansas City, Kan.) Also 
to Unions 145, Sayre, Pa. ; 153, 
Helena, Mt>nt. ; 201, Wichita. Kan., 
and 204, Colleen, 111. 



No More Arrears Notices. 



Under the newly amended Consti- 
tution now in force, no arrears no- 
tices need hereafter be sent by the 
F. S., as formerly, to members two 
months In arrears. That is dispensed 
with. See Section 89 (a) of Constitu- 
tion on that point. 



Mayor Jones, of Toledo, O., has 
put an eight hour day into eilect for 
the police force instead of twelve hours, 
and without increased cost to the tax 
payers, and has adopted the same 
system on all city public work. 



2 



THE CARPENTER, 




Wants a Rule for Tapering Shafts. 



(Tnl* Department I* open lor criticism ani 
tortespondmte Irom our readers on mechanical 
in Carpentry, and Idea* a* to Cratt 



Write on on* side 01 the paper only. All 
tiould be signed. 

tor thlA Department must be Id this 
by tbe 3<thof the month.) 



Making Windows Air Tight. 

From K. W. G„ Ticonderoga, N. V. 

I recently had a job here to make 
windows air tight and did it in this 
way : By taking off the outside blinds 
and rehanglng sash In their place, 
making a double sash. Then I put 
weather strips on the stop beads and 
outside blind stop and on the meeting 
rails of all the sashes. The decrease 



r 



ST HO I X 



f 



5 



in the cost of coal has more than paid 
for the labor and cost of stuff and the 
house Is cooler in summer. 



Fastening Trim to Stone or Brickwork 



From A. F., Madison, Wis. 

What is tbe easiest and quickest 
method of attaching trim to stone or 
brickwork laid in cement, as the 
joints are so hard it is impossible to 
cut through them with a cold chisel 
and a hammer for plugs ? This work 
of drilling for plugs is hard and tedi- 
ous and if one of the brothers will 
give me an idea on this It would help 
"one who hates to do it." 



The Best Method of Hanging Sliding 



Design for Boat House. 



From Unknown, Philadelphia. 

I have two tapering- shafts and 
desire a rule in practical geometry 
that will equally divide their solid 
contents subject to each respective 
length. I have a number of rules for 



From Cyril K , Montreal, Can. 

Sir : — What Is the usual practice 
in the States in hanging sliding doors ? 
Are they hung from the top or set on 
track on the floor, and which is the 
better working method, as I find the 
settlement of the floors, If there be 
much, throws the doors out of level 
and they don't come to a joint? 
Kindly answer and oblige. 

Note— The above letter is placed 
before the brothers for their reply. 



From Win, P., Anaemia, Conn. 

Would Mr. Wood please publish a 
design for a small boat house about 
25 x 60, one story high, with a peaked 
roof and two gables, with the prob- 
able cost of same. 



Let Us Hear From the Woodworkers. 



From H. P. C, Indianapolis, Ind. 

How Is it that there is nothing 
published in The Carpenter about 
woodworking machinery ? There are 
a great number of woodworking 
brothers in the Brotherhood, and if 
they read the paper they should be 
glad to write something worth read- 
ing for the reat of usf Come on, boys, 
and let us hear from you In 1899. 





this but none of them appear to be 
correct Perhaps either Mr. Magin- 
nis or Mr. Hodgson can give a correct 
rule for this, which perhaps may fill a 
long felt want and be a source of 
great satisfaction to many of our 
friends. 



Calculating Stuff. 



From G. O., Portland, Me. 

Here is a craft problem for some of 
the wiseacres. Lit then figure me 
up the amount of stuff board meas- 
ure of the following bill of material . 

LIST OV ROl l'.ll Tl M HER. 

Girder, plantd, 1 yellow pine timber, 

S x 10 x 1 8 feet long. 
Firtt floor beams, 40 spruce timbers, 

3 x 12 x 24 feet long. 
Second floor beams, 40 spruce timbeis, 

; x 12 x -M feet long. 
Wall plates, 4 spruce timbers, 4 x S x 

25 ftet long. 
Studding, 100. spruce, 4x6s 20 feet 

long. 

Rafters, 26, spruce, front, 3x6x21 ftet 
long. 

Rafters, 35, spruce, rear, 3 x 6 x 1 s ftet 
long. 

Collar beams, 26, 3 x 6 x 12 feet long. 
Ridge trees, 3, 2 x io x 2S feet lonj*. 
Valley rafters, 2, 3 x 10 x 2.? fee t long. 
Bridging, 400 lineal feet, x 3 
inches. 

Furring, 1,500 lineal feet, 1 x j, spruce. 
Hemlock sheathing, ,;,oou square 
feet, x 8 inches 



Bui' palo, N. Y.— -The central labor 
body of this city has won its fight 
in compelling the Edgemoor Bridge 
Company, Wilmington, Del., to respect 
the eight-hour day and weekly pay in 
constructing the Seneca- Hamburg 



FLOORING. 
1,500 square feet of 2 x 3 Inch, yellow 

pine, tongued and grooved. 
1,500 square feet r - x 3 inch, tongued 

and grooved North Carolina pine 
6,500 square feet ceiling, tongued and 

grooved ant! beaded. 

All above stttfl to be free from 
knots, shakes, etc.. to DC kiln dried 
and of good quality. 

(iahle Pitt***. 



DV A W. WOOIWi 




V request of a reader we sub 
mit a few gable ornament: 
suitable for cottages. 

These designs are sucb 
as we have used in our 
uwn work with good results 

Gable ornaments are rot as popular 
as they were a few years ago, espe 
cially for tli- better class of buildings 
but for cottages or residences of mod- 
erate cost, work of this kind greatly 
improves the general apptarance ot 
the house. Vet it has its objection* 
in the way of costs, bird roosts and 
keeping in repair Work of this kind 
should be wt-11 made and joints well 
painted before putting together, and 
all but the last coat of paint applied 
before putting in place It is our in- 
tention to show other designs in this 
class of work. 





THE CARPENTER. 



3 



Some British Notes, 



UV THOMAS RBKCK. 

Coining from the secretary of one 
of the largest Unions in the country, 
the remarks of F. Chandler, of the 
Amalgamated Society of Carpenters 
and Joiners, upon the now alt absorb- 
ing question of Trades Federation, 
are worthy of the deepest attention. 
He frankly does not much believe in 
the National Federation of Trades, 
which is being proposed —and has 
been proposed for the last fifty years 
in different shapes and forms Frotn 
his point of view national federation, 
if carried into t Heel, would only result 
in bringing into existence a parallel 
federation of employers, «nd, as the 
workmen federation would be bound 
to bo weaker than the employers' 
combine, owing to the large number 
of non-unionists there are in these 
countries— in the pitched battle of 
massed forces which would even- 
tuate labor would most probably sus- 
tain defeat. 

» * * # 

He casts his vote in favor of more 
attention ntini: paid to each Trade 
Union 's organization and expansion. 
I'erfect the societies which now exist, 
lessen the huge totals uf workmen who 
are outside these Unions, make every 
trade organization include, if possible, 
every worker in the trade, Rid pro- 
ceed with the older and quieter 
methods of obtaining concessions — 
above all things avoid unnecessarily 
alarming the plutocracy by any theat- 
rical but insecure show of magnitude 
-these are the tenor of his remarks. 
* * * # 

The Amalgamated Society is favor- 
able to an amalgamation of the kin- 
dred Unions in the carpenters and 
joiners trades, and has sent around 
circulars to the other large unions to 
that effect. William Midntyre, of 
the Associated Society, has been in- 
structed, however, that his Union 
would not entertain such a proposal. 
W. Watkin, of the ( -eueral Union, 
suggests a conference between his 
society and the Amalgamated, and 
it seems fairly likely that these two 
fine Trade I nions may, after a time, 
fuse. 



A rather painful dispute has by 
degrees crept into the trade repre- 
sented by this letter. In the naval 
dockyards, joiners have been recently 
doing work which the shipwrights 
consider (and I think correctly) to be 
their own particular vocation. These 
jobs have been such things as laying 
decks, erecting bulkheads, etc , and a 
tremendous amount of ill-feeling has 
been engendered in consequence. 
When the joiners at Devonport dock- 
yard commenced this kind of work a 
protest from the shipwrights secured 
a cessation of it. Now the dispute 
has broken out at Pembroke and some 
other yards. The joiners say that 
owing to the widespread substitution 
of ironwork for woodwork in modern 
vessels, that section of the joiner's 
trade is being gradually wiped out 
and they are entitled to get employ- 
ment at what was formerly regarded 
as shipwright's work. 



The end of it will, most likely, be 
that by a year or two the twohitherto 
distinct bran c' ^s of dockyard work 
will be combined into one, but until 
then a period of dispute and bad blood 
may be looked for. 

* * *■ ♦ 

Reports as to the state of employ- 
ment vary considerably, London be- 
ing classed " fairly good," whilst 
other parts of the country swing from 
".moderate" to "well-employed." 
The state of trade throughout Scot- 
land is " good, " whilst carpenters in 
Ireland are having rather a slack 

time, except in Dublin. 

* * # # 

An attempt on the part of an em- 
ployer in Newport, Mon , to get his 
caipenters (who, by- the- by, were non- 
Unionists) to start work at an earlier 
hour than was usual throughout the 
trade was met by all the men ceasing 
work for four days Then the boss 

withdrew the notice. 

* # * + 

The London members of the A. S. 
C J are talking of Laving a Trades 
Hall for themselves inthe metropolis. 
Greenwich Branch is taking the lead 
in the agitation, and as there are in 
London ijuite 7,000 members of the 
Union, distributed amongst nearly 
eighty branches, the usefulness of a 
centralized metropolitan headquarters 
is evident London's share of the 
reserve funds of the society is about 
ninety thousand dollars, and it is sug- 
gested that a loan might be advanced 
against this to build the hall. This 
loan would be repaid to the reserve 
fund by a quarterly special levy of 
twenty- five cents on London mem- 
bers. 

* * * * 

The Tjne members of the Union 
are still resolute in refusing to work 
more overtime than can be possibly 
helped, in order to give their unem- 
ployed comrades an added oppor- 
tunity. The employers have desired 
to break down this rule, but without 

success. 

* * * # 

The carpenters and joiners of Salis- 
bury have succeeded in getting an 
advance from twelve to thirteen cents 
per hour, making their average weekly 
wages SMUT $7.50 The Selkirk men 
have gained an increase from fourteen 
to fifteen c nts per hour. 



A Beautiful Home 



MY I. 1*. HICKS, OMAHA, NEH. 



Notices as to Disability Benefits. 



Local Unions and members are 
requested to study Section 106 (A) of 
the new Constitution relating to 
claims for disability benefits. The 
old law has been amended, so sixty 
days' notice after surgeons or doctors 
decide a member is permanently dis- 
abled will be sufficient, provided 
claim is filed at this office within one 
year from date of accident. 

The Marlboro Shoemakers' Strike. 

The Shoemakers of Marl boro, Mass., 
have been on strike several months 
against an attempt of the manufact- 
urers of that city to destroy the Boot 
and Shoe Workers' Union. livery 
eflort at conciliation and settlement 
has been repulsed by the bosses. The 
following firms are the unfair ones : 
S H. Howe Shoe Company, Marlboro, 
Mass ; John A. Frye, Marlboro, Mass ; 
John O'Connell, Marlboro, 
Rice & Hutching, Marlboro, 



HE plan here presented is 
an elegant eight room resi- 
dence and an artistic de- 
sign which has been built 
from several times in djffer- 
parts of the country. We have two 
modifications of this plan, in which 
the size has been reduced some, and a 
lew other changes made to reduce ex- 
pense of building the house, in order 
to meet the requirements of those who 
wanted to build after this plan. 



12 squares first floor com- 
plete, $7 '5 

1 2 squares second floor com- 
plete $7 50 . 

32 squares outside wallscom- 
plete, $055 

1 7 J squares roofi ng complete, 
$8 75 

12 squares ceiling complete, 

54 75 

18 squares partitions com- 
plete. $7.20 . . . . 

140 lineal feet outside base. 5c. 

200 lineal feet corner casings, 
6c 

1 So lineal feet belt course cas- 
ings, 6c 

280 lineal feet main cornice, 
22c. • 



S85 80 

90 00 

3<>5 <*> 
153 13 
57 otJ 

1 20 60 
7 00 

12 00 

IO 80 

71 60 




EIHHT ROOM HOLSE. 

The size of the house as shown by 
the engraving in this issue is 34 feet 
6 inches by 49 feet over all except the 
steps. Cellar under kitchen, pantry, 
bedroom, and part of dining room. 
Height of first story 9 feet, second 
storv 8 feet 6 inches. 

The rooms are all large and con- 
veniently arranged. The house is 
calculated for hot air heating, and at 
the same time is well calculated for 
heating bystoves. the chimneys being 
placed so that they are available for 
all but one back room on the second 



FROST ELEVATION. 

no lineal feet gutter, 14c. 
24 lineal feet front porch, S3 
22 lineal feet back porch, 

28 windows complete $7 
6 gable windows complete, 

$5 

20 doors complete, $7.25 
3 double sliding doors com- 
plete, $19 
Basing two small rooms, $2 80 
Basing two medium rooms, 

S3 25 

Basing four large rooms, 53 no 
Basing hall, second story 
Wainscoting kitchen . 



'5 40 
72 00 

5500 
i<)t> 00 

3c 1.00 
145 00 

57 00 

5 60 

6 50 
IS 20 

3 00 
850 




floor. Space is provided back of the 
kitchen stairs for an ice box, and in 
the bath room for a large water tank 
The plan as a whole is a very pleasing 
and desirable one. The estimated 
cost is as follows : 

172 yards excavating, 25c. . $4! 00 
800 cubic feet brick wall, 19c 152 00 
560 superficial feet brick cellar 

bottom, 10c. . . 56 00 

41 lineal feet double flue 
chimney, $1.40 . . 57 40 

18 lineal feet chimney breast, 

$2 SO 45 00 

18 lineal feet double flue 

t, $1.40 . as 20 



Wainscoting and finishing 

bathroom . . . .1000 
Finishing pantry . . . 8 on 
Finishing china closet . . mim 
Finishing five closets, $1 80 . 900 
Front stairs . . . .450*1 
Back stairs . . . 20 00 

Cellar 5 00 

Fainting 780 yards, 18c. . 14040 
Plumbing . . .21500 

Gas Fitting . . . . 25 00 
Tin and iron work . , 50 00 

Incidentals, 5 per cent. . 122.39 



Total titimatt , . $3,570.11 



4 



THE CARPENTER. 



THE CARPENTER 



PHILADELPHIA, FEBRUARY, 1899. 




Curves as Used by Carpenters and 
Jolners.-XVI. 



RY FRED. T. HODGSON. 




{Concluded). 

N THE papers of this series 
that were chiefly devoted to 
scrolls, I did not make much 
reference to elliptical, or to 
irregular scrolls, and, as 
these are sometimes required, it may 
not be amiss to exhibit a few examples 
of this kind, and with this purpose in 
view the following Illustrations and 
descriptions are presented. 



semicircle N, K, touching E, on the 
centre as shown, and the outline of 
the figure is complete. 

The narrowing up of the lines of 
the scroll may be accomplished by 
any of the methods shown In previous 
papers, the same centres being em- 
ployed, with slight variations, In every 
case. 

To describe an elliptical scroll to 
any height and projection from centre, 
proceed as follows : Divide the height 
F, C, or E, M, Fig. 154. into twenty- 
three equal parts, taking the centre 
E, ten divisions from the bottom ; 
through N, the first division above E, 
draw N, P, cutting the diagonal line 
E, O, at F. On E, as a centre, with 
a radius E, F. describe the circle, or 
through E, draw P, Q ; at right 
angles to the diagonal line, O, S, 
make E, P, and E, Q, each equal to 
E, F; on F, as a centre, with the 
distance L, F, describe an arc, L, H, 
cutting E, H, at right angles to L, M. 





Fig. 153.— an angular 

Fig. 153 exhibits what may be 
termed an angular scroll, and the 
method of describing the lines to form 
it, which is taken from a work now 
out of print, Is as follows ; The per- 
pendicular, A, B, Is divided into 
twenty-three equal parts ; then make 
the centre of the eye on a line with 
the tenth division up, or thirteenth 
division down, and through this 
centre draw H, T, at right angles to 
A, B; bisect the angle through the 
centre by the diagonal line D, C ; 
through the next division above H, 
on the line A, B, draw K, E, parallel 
to H, T, cutting the line D, C, at E. 
On the centre of eye, with a radius to 
E, describe a circle cutting D, C, on 
the opposite side of the centre at E ; 
divide E, E, into six equal parts at 
3, s, centre, 6, 4, and E, then with 
the upper E, as a centre and E, P, as 
radius, describe an arc, P. K, cutting 
D, C ; then with radiuB from lower E, 
to C, describe the semicircle C, T, 
cutting H, T, at T ; o, 3, with radius 
3, T, describe semicircle T, K, con- 
tinue to L. On 4, as a centre with the 
radius 4, L, describe the semicircle L, 
M ; on 5, as a centre with radius 5, 
M, describe the semicircle M, N; on 
6, with a radius 6, N, deacribe^Uw 



SCROLL. 



Fill. I 54 ■ — -AN EL 

At H, from K, make E, G, equal to 
the d. stance the projection of the 
scroll is intended to be from the 
centre; divide G, H, Into six equal 
parts, and set one of t^e parts to I ; 
make E, K, and E, K, each equal to 
tl e sum of the two lines, E. F, and 
G, I. Through the points K, P, R tj, 
complete the parallelogram A, B, C, 
D, whose sides, A, B. C, D, are 
parallel to P, Q. and A, D; B, C, 
parallel to K, B, draw the diagonals, 

A, C, and B, D, and divide each of 
them Into six equal parts ; then on 

B, as a centre, with radius B, L, 
describe the arc, L, *, cutting A. B, 
produced at b. On A, as a centre, 
with a radius A, b, describe the arc 

A, c, cutting A, D, produced at C ; on 

B, as a centre, with the radius D, c, 
describe the arc, c, d, cutting C, D, 
produced at d • on C, as a centre, 
with radius, C, d, describe an arc, 
d, e ; on 5, as a centre, with radius, 
5, e, describe an arc, e, /; on 6, as a 
centre, with radius, 6, /, describe an 
arc, /, g ; on 7, as a centre, with 



LII'TICAL SCROLL. 

radius, 7, g , describe an arc, g. h \ 
On 8, as a centre, with radius, K. h, 
describe an arc, N, i I'rocted in this 
manner, beginning the third revolu 
tion at 9, and end at 12. Lastly, 
describe an ellipse, touching the 'ast 
centre of the third revolution, H, 
being its centre, and its transverse 
and congregate a "is being in the 
same ratio as the length or height of 
the scroll is to its width, and the 
scroll will be complete. 

ThU is a beautiful example, and its 
construction cannot fall of interesting 
as well as instructing the young stu- 
dent. It belongs to the "higher 
curves, "and a knowledge of the prin- 
ciples of the laws that underlie its 
construction, Imply a familiarity with 
geometry of a high order. Later on 
I will, with the editor's permission, 
present a chapter or two on the 
" higher curves," and their relation 
to the bu'lding arts. 

At Fig. I S5 I exhibit a design that 
may be used for many purposes. It 
was originally designed years ago for 



I 




Fig. 155, 



THE CARPENTER. 



a drop cornice of a verandah, but it 
would answer quite well for a "barge- 
board," or for a cresting, Indeed, it 
would prove quite effective for the 
latter purpose on a building of suita- 
ble style. As the centres and distances 
are all shown and lettered in the left 
hand diagram, a further description 
will be quite unnecessary. 

Fig. 156 la an example of cut work, 
Intended to form one-half of a panel, 
the other half being the same pattern 
reversed ; or the two ornaments may 
be used in two panels with a muntln 
or other device between them. 

At Fig. 157 I show two examples of 
ornamental panels, Kach ornament 
terminates at A A, and may be doubled 
with itself, or may show only half the 
design, as exhibited. 

Fig. 158 shows another design 
suited for a panel or for screen work. 
One half is shown open, the other 
with a solid back. 

The design shown at Fig. 15'j makes 
a very effective bracket, Is easily 
designed and easily made. 

This paper ends the series, not be- 
cause the subject is exhausted, but 
because I have noticed that in these 
days of "rush" and rapid changes, 
men get wearied, and often dissatis- 
fied at long and continued eflort in 
one direction, so 1 close here, but will 
in the future, from time to time, add 



A 





Fa; 157, 

other chapters on "curves " as neces- 
sity may suggest. I hope what has 
been presented in this series has not 
altogether fallen on barren soil, and 
that some readers of Carpenter have 
been able to extract good and useful 
suggestions from them ; if this is 80, 
I shall feel satisfied, and content that 
my efforts have been not altogether 
In vain. 

Next mouth, with the editor's per- 
mission, I will take up the questions 
of "Hopper and splay work," and 
whMe I cannot promise much that is 
new in the way of quicker methods 
for obtaining the various cuts, I th ink 
I may safely say that I will be able to 
present many of the old methods in a 
simple and convenient manner, and 
by divesting them of high sounding 
terms to some extent, render them 
more understandable to the man who 
executes the work. 

In dealing with the subject of 
"Hoppers, etc," I will endeavor to 




FIG. 158. 




publish every known method, and 
if any reader has discovered, or in- 
vented any method for obtaining lines 
and cuts that I do not posses?, I will 
take it as a great favor if he will sub- 
mit the same to me for publication or 
for examination, for it may he that 
some bright, sharp workman has 
struck some very quick method for 
solving "Hopper and splay" work 
that is worthy ot perpetuation, and 
this condition can he brought about 
by the introduction of such method 
into the columns of Carpenter. 
{ Concluded. ) 



Fir,. 159. 



Claims Approved In December, 1808. 

No. Nana. Union Ant 

I37K Cltas Enke ... 1 f WO 00 

4379. Prank Ce.1 erst rum 7 200 00 

mo, Mr*. Vrrna Workman 11 50 00 

i ;-]. Henry BteUob 18 ww oa 

1882. Wm. O'Neil I£3 300 00 

0B, DnveW. Canon IW 210 00 

MSC Arthur Jone* M0 .'00 00 

in*.' Hichard E. Penis . . . K{ JOt 00 

HUM, Jnhn Uuebner HQ 200 00 

43S7. Henry Trowbridge .... IH7 300 On 

I:**. John I>. McDonald 17U 200 00 

tttW. Q. W. Mo>re ...... Mil -"00 00 

HM, Mrs. t.ydia A. All*up . , . 257 50 CO 

HIM, IJavtd II. Clark 2h8 .'CO to 

tSUi, ThekU Sen mil Ling 201 ")0 00 

OH, f-URtav Hugel 3"" ZOO 00 

13'.'t. Mrs. Marie Knripp ... SMI 60 00 

(3P& John chriHtniann 340 200 00 

4HW1. Mm. Annie Q, Thompson 310 60 00 

s*W7. Chriatiana PlyRare ..... 310 ■'*> 00 

1,'M Mrs Mary Mulligan - ... 312 50 00 

MM, Frederick Waag (Di*.) . . 37,'j lot 00 

1 10' i. Hriiry Dattehower .... 408 50 00 

4101. Wm. Vanderford (Ot*.) 427 joo to 

I10J jamert 1< llarr ...... 437 2<0 00 

1 1113. hp I'ehr ... . . 401 t$i 00 

114 A. Vandervrrr Vorheeit . HIS 200 UU 

4I0.V Win. Byrne* 178 200 00 

44 II. Mm. Hiilira Hetfter . . . 4:i7 50 00 

4407. Mr*. Kilt 1W1 y . . . 583 25 00 

410* Mr* Clyde (Soff ... . 628 60 00 

IKII. Marvin Hancock . ...... 471 GO 00 

4110. John Krouae «S0 SO 00 

4IU. George Lloyd ( 1)1*. ) . . . . 451 Am 00 

Total 



Thk Supreme Court of Colorado 
has decided the eight-hour city ordi- 
nance of Denver is constitutional. 



Chic Atio Bricklayers Union notified 
Commissioner of Public Works Mc- 
Gann not long since that members of 
the Union would hereafter protect the 
city's interests in all sewer and tunnel 
work. Union workmen will refuse to 
handle dry brick or material in 
public improvements which is not up 
to the specifications. 




RECEIPTS, DKC EMBER. 1*98. 

I torn the Unions, tax, etc fti.341 39 

" Advertiser* 1*1 25 

" Rent 10 00 

" D C. supplie* H 00 

» Subscription* :i 50 

" Clearances 3 hi 

" Miscellaneous 00 

Balance, December 1,1898 20.860 Id 

Total J27 175 00 

Total eapense* 7,721 S3 

Cash balance. January I, 1890 flU.450 77 




FOR TAJC, PINS AND SUPPLIES. 

During the month ending December 81, 1868. 
Whenever any error* appear notify the O. S.-T. 
without delay. 




i If i 



i 



DETAILED EXPENSES, DECEMBER, 1W$. 

Printing 1 000 physician'* certificates f 8 75 

1,000 claim* for benefit ... 12 25 

" 1,000 stamped envelope* . . 190 

" .'ii postal* ......... 1 50 

" ;'i00 password circular* . . 9 2T> 

" 10,000 membership card* . , 25 00 

40 200-page ledger* 44 NO 

10 400>page ledger* . . 30 00 
18,750 copie* January Caipbm- 

TBI . . 465 00 

extra tabular matter, general 

vote on Constitution . . . 78 2) 

Composition of new Constitution ... «0 **. ■ 

Engraving* for Cahi kitkh 49 70 

Special writer* for " .... 29 00 

Pre** Clipping Bureau 6 00 

10 telegram* . 3 92 

Kxpreraage on supplies, etc 21 74 

Postage 28 82 

1 oijo stamped envelope* , ....... It M 

fioo postal* fi 00 

Office rent for December 25 00 

Quarterly rent of P. O. box :! 00 

Salary and clerk hire 342 hi 

Tar to A. F. of L. for November , . 66 07 

One ton ot coal 5 75 

Pour Welsbach lights 5 90 

One ash can 2 25 

Advert til or commission* 100 00 

Rubber seal* and deter* 2. 

Stationery and incidental* 1 50 

Janitor I 89 

John William*, to Batevla, N. V. . . . 23 51 

D. F. Healheratoo: canvaa*ing board . 30 00 

M. A. Mallei , " " 30 00 

Wealey C. Hall, " " 18 00 

B. J. Kent, postage, etc 2 50 

" " Delegate to A. P. of L, . . 76 75 

O. K. Woodbury, . 101 50 

P. J. McGuire. . Ml 46 

11 I.loyd, " " " . . 1N1 75 
D. C. of New York 600 00 

Newark, N. J 800 r 

i NO*. 4,378 to 4.411 4.925 U 

Total t 7.724 03 



1- 1152 20 

2 22 80 

8 9 35 

5 31 40 

8 7 16 

7 88 40 

8 22 70 

8 — hi 80 

10 — 108 SO 

11— 42 20 

13 10 00 

Ii 4 20 

15 19 20 

18 — 22 40 

18 3 80 

1H UM yO 

21 22 00 

22 20 

23 00 

24 - z ; 00 

25 18 65 

28 :S 75 

27 10 60 

28 8 40 

29 93 80 

;» — r; 80 

81 20 00 

32 2H 40 

33 - 1011 50 

34 14 20 

85 5 20 

;|(S 14 40 

87 5 00 

88 8 20 

3., h 00 

40 3 80 

41 18 75 

42 18 00 

4 : 8* 00 

44 » 90' 

-14 20 
-10 Hi 

47 25 66 

48 2 00 

60 — ;i no 

51 - 60 15 

52 '20 00 

53 6 00 

54 25 80 

-80 20 

80 

57 8 80 

69 7 40 

00 11 20 

HI 51) 70 

82 88 

83 l.'i 10 

hi — 20 ho 

S= ,: , l 8 

67 8 00 

88 I 00 

70 8 80 

7) a 60 

72 ;Hi H,' 

73 71 00 

74 5 80 

75 1 

78 I 00 

77 10 00 

78 21 gf 

SO— 18 00 
82 i 40 

84 4 M 

86 * 00 

87 '20 80 



105 14 '20 217 04 20 424 *H 40 

108 14 «0 218 15 00 127 81 OS 

107- II 80 220 60 428 1 40 

10B 4B 75 221 6 00 429 hi 10 

110 17 SO 222 10 433 14 60 

111- — 7 30 223 9 00 434 3 40 

112 - 67 70 225 4 80 437 6 40 

114 10 40 227 ti 05' 439 6 40 

115 3 751228 10 00! 440 — VI 20 

116- 2 70 229 5 442 :t 20 

UK 2N 80| '2#> M 001 444 7 40 

120 8 20 231 10 20 418 8 7O 



2m 
2M- 



121 10 00 232 2 J0 ! 119 2M & 

12-2 10 40 

123 7 80 

124 7 20 

125 61 

126 6 HO 

127 12 40 

129 6 40 

131 40 00 



40i 451 20 |B 

It) 75 453 :'.S 20 

4 SO 457 40 40 

4 00 400 2 20 

8 40 462 II 60 

10 40 464 33 20 

15 10' 487 4 40 

241- — 4 00 188 27 Li 

133 16 201 212 12 80 471 — -41 70 

134 7 40 243^ 8 00. 473 — 43 45 



■2H7- 



£«)- 



135—17 20 
4 8U 
137 6 tilt 



244 



4 OB 



139 17 00 248 9 70 

140 '< 40 

141 2U 86 

142- 23 00 
14'; — 2 00 
144 - 4 80 

147 10 80 

148 37 60 

I 
I 

III 



474 



4 20 



34« 3 20 478 *1 80 

!47 21 20 478 42 40 

12 10 

251 9 00 483 27 00 

252 8 80. 484 11 00 

256 8 00! 4Wt 10 60 

25H 8 85 490 20 40 

257 2 75 493 21 80 

25B 16 05 497 12 20 

269 U 40 499 6 60 



« :» 260 8 00 607 

« 40 261 I 00 

262 14 2, 



8 85 

152 3 40 263 10 00 



155 5 40 

167 2 00 

168^ 10 00 

169 4 00 

160 nl 80 

161 12 20 

183 t) 80 

184 2 00 

168 8 110 

187 21 20 

168 It 00 



26K- 
273— 
274- 

275 

Wt- 

287- 



291 

296 

300 



80 
7 40 
13 40 

15 00 

13 60 

14 20 

1 so 

5 80 

16 80 

2 60 



7 80 

509 l!l 50 

518 ttl 40 

515 14 80 

521 16 50 

522 13 40 

626 3H HO 

534 4 00 

,551—14 00 
583—177 40 

564 ^12 45 

567 -26 20 
,'>78 3 80 

80 — 6 80 



.11 uo \m 



170 4 00 305 — 

171 11 00 306 17 ■■0 

172 II 201 .109 — 18.1 1*7 

173 2 40 316— 8 40 

174 :tl . :i)lt~- 2 SO 

175 18 0.V 323 2 40. 611 8 20 



7 HO 584 -21 56 

11 00 588 14 40 

10 OO! 691 12 MO 

692—22 50 

.-.93 8 50 

803 8 40 

I 80 



176 
177- 



.11 20 



is 80 
5 70 

17B 17 70 

180 B 20 

181— 06 20 

1K2 I 00 

183 00 

181 8 60 

186 2 40 

187 11 20 

188 4 20 

180 66 40 851 

190 7 20 8! 

ltil- 



325— 8 60 
327- 



6 20 35H 

7 20 

IU3 16 00i 381. 

184 2 20 385 

1 06 H DO 370 

P16 4 40. 871 

t!i7 17 80| 374 



4 811 
17 00 

5 40 
333 '20 40 

4 20 
77 40 
4 40 

10 to 

84(1 4 20 

348 12 40 

352 22 00 

10 20 
4 00 



. 80 
7 JO 



-16 '20 Hl»8- 



3 40 
18 16 

4 00 

687 v 55 

888 8 43 

839 15 40 

840 4 90 

860 6 30 

852 16 m 

4 80 
.11 80 

887 8 10 

876 fi 20 

878 10 20 

887 8 20 

B!r2 8 00 

. 4 80 



. 188- — ■ 7 00| 376 — 158 40 
1 00 1 1911 — -24 10 381 — 18 20 

89 2 I " '202 10 40 382- -88 8» 

80 27 80 203 16 40 891 8 20 

92 6 00 208— 7 40 393 5 '20 

83 2,i 207 18 10 



8 05 

4 60" 703 - — 8 80 

2 20 707 12 30 

-'20 35 712 I 60 



714- — 8 40 

715 37 00 

718 22 OO 

717 4 40 

T28 13 00 



8 80 726 17 80 

94 6 00 208 — I 80l 898 :t 00 7W 2 80 

88 — 34 00 208 16 001400 3 00 746 2 20 

B7-— • 6 00 210 —16 10 402 7 80 750 13 35 

88 4« 80 211 83 40(408 4 801 757 4 20 

787 2 40 

4 40 
8 80 




20 212 16 80! 407 12 20 



4 00 



214 8 00 418 32 00 

10 80 419 42 HO 



215 10 

218 16 



Total 







18,341 39 



n 



THE CARPENTER. 



The Building of a Semi-Spiral Stair- 
case. 



BY OWHN H MAC.innis 




|n writing this article for the 
benefit of those who rarely 
meet this class of work, I do 
so merely for the purpose of 
suggesting a method rather 
than a positive system. The problem 
is a most difficult and tedious one and 
requires much patience and thought. 

In commencing, I would refer the 
studious carpenter to the large dia- 
gram Fig [, where he will see the 
plan and projected elevation of a senii- 
splral staircase, 16 feet in diameter, 
with an S foot radius for the outside 
string and a 4 -foot radius for the 1b- 

I 

rl 



plan as shown must be laid out on a 
tloor the full size, or a portion, say 
half of it, may be laid down in order 
to obtain the exact sizes of the treads 
and risers. Now, to determine the 
exact shape of the twisted inside and 
outside strings, proceed as follows: 

Draw a straight line and on it with 
a big pair of compasses or a trammel 
rod, set off nine spaces each equal to 
the outside width of the tiead from 1 
to 17. From these points raise up 
perpendiculars in the manner repre- 
sented at the top of Fig. 1 . Divide 
the left hand perpendicular into seven- 
teen spaces, each equal in height to 
the height of a riser, namely, 654 
inches, and draw horizontal lines 
across to intersect with each perpen- 




FlO. I.— LAY OUT OF STAIKCASU. 



side string. There are eighteen risers 
in a height io feet from first floor to 
second floor, so that to determine the 
height of each riser, we do the follow- 
ing little arithmetic : 

10 feet reduced to inches — 1 20 
Inches. 

120 divided by 18 m 0% inches, or 
dU inches, so that there will be 
eighteen risers at G % Inches. 

From these figures two pitch boards 
can be made as two will be required, 
namely, one for the outside string and 
one for the inside. That for the out- 
side string will be seen on the floor 
line A B between the projection dotted 
lines as X and that for the inside 
string will be seen at V, between 8 
and g on the plan. Both pitches or 
rim are the same but the run differs 
in width, the outside string being 1K 
Inches run and the inside o inches, 
giving a mean or average width on 
the tread or walking line of 13^ 
inches. 

In laying out this staircase, the 



dicular according to its number. By 
tracing a curved line from point to 
point, the exact shape of the string 
will be obtained. When working out 
this system of lines it is better to 
place three or four ^-Inch or ,^-inch 
pine boards placed together on the 
floor edge to edge, and to lay out and 
draw the curves on these boards, 
keeping them together with thin hard- 
wood battens, or they may be cut to 
the curve with the compass saw or 
band saw and then battened together. 
It will be noticed that I publish no 
engraving with the foregoing descrip- 
tion, as the method of procedure is 
clearly shown move the line A B at 
Fig. i, where the reader will perceive 
I have found the exact elevation of 
both strings, risers and treads by carry- 
ing up the points from the plan below. 
These diagrams may be made sepa- 
rately or to scale. 

Concerning the construction ot 
twisted work of tb 1 "- class, I have 
found that the best practical method 
Is to build them up to the desired 
thickness in ^ or ^ inch thick- 
nesses of veneer reversing the grains 
so as to obtain the best safeguards 
against warping or working. If the 




-VKTHOD Ol' II8NDIMQ INS I OK 
STKJNO 



curves are sharp the pieces of venter 
should be placed in a steam box and 
steamed till they are pliable, and then 
bent over a drum or mold constructed 
in the wav represented at Fig, 
Similarly big. 3 shows the bending 
of outside string. Btcb strip «>: 
veneer should be bent, strip on strip, 
till entire thickness is bent, then 
when dry they should be taken oil, 
heated iti the hot hox and glued to 
gether. Clamps, hand screws, ceiling 
shores and wedges nhonld be used 
liberally ttQ as to get the veneers closi; 
together and in this way form tin- 
exact mold. 

Fig 4 is the panelling to side on 
the outside string, if same be against 
a semi circular wall and the inside 
string be open. It is built up as be 
fore and the panels are put in with 
points. 




Fin. 3. — Ml >LI) 1 or ot tsidk vi m NO, 




FlG. 4.— ELEVATION OK i'AttUU WAINSCOT. 



7 



Drawing Lesson. 



BY A W. WOODS 




( )K our lesson this month we 
will take that of isoinetri- 
cal drawing. In architec- 
tural working drawings it 
is the custom of showing 
only one side of the object including 
projections on the sides, such as bay 
windows, porches, etc , and with alt 
parts at a uniform scale, but in iso- 
nietrical drawings is shown three 
views at scale in a single figure with 
the lines of the respective sides 
parallel. 



as they recede from the eye appear to 
diminish in size and for that reason 
isometrical drawing is not well adapted 
for large work. 

Our illustration shows that of a 
carpenter's tool chest. The reader 
will notice that the end and side lines 
are drawn at an a^gle of ^o a from the 
horizontal or (>u a from the perpendicu- 
lar Hues. Some other degree might 
be used, but the above gives about 
the best results, then again, angles 
are only to be had on the 45 and 
V* and 6o° slants, the latter two 
being the same only reversed. They 
may be had at most any first class 
book store or a 30 and 6o° angle can 



Padgett's Breezy Letter. 




This class of drawing Is useful in 
illustrating small objects, such as 
giving the dimensions of lumber, cut 
stone, furniture, etc , as it gives a 
much clearer idea at a glance of what 
Is wanted than is given by the single 
e evation of the different sides, and in 
most cases is quite as easily drawn, 
but for large objects the dimensions 
appear to be out of proportion, which 
is caused by the absence of vanishing 
points, and consequently no fixed 
point of sight as In the common per- 
spective. 



1 . 

be easily made, as it Is equal to one- 
half of an equilateral triangle and 
can be laid out as shown in Pig. 2. 
Lay out the diagram at any desired 
size on a piece of hard wood about i of 
an inch in thickness and dress to the 
lines as shown. 

In our next lesson we will continue 
this subject with further illustrations, 
also that of cabinet perspective show- 
ing the difierence between the two. 




U wing to the laws of sight, objects 



The "New York City Carpenters " 
is the title of a narrow, isolated, inde- 
pendent local organization in Gotham, 
recently made up of a combination of 
the K of L carpenters, known at the 
" Progressives " and of a small fac- 
tion of what was the " United Order 
Carpenters." These impracticables 
want " to build a wall around New York 
city," but are not in position to carry 
out that exclusive plan. They how- 
ever, admit members for any initiation 
fee at all and are not over particular 
as to enforcing the Union scale of 
wages. Our New York Unions ar» now 
engaged In a contest against these 
disturbers of trade unity. 



Kditor of The Carpenter : 

" There ia a maxim in the schools 
That flattery istlie food of fools " 

Johnnie Bull, in November Car- 
penter, touched my vanity by re- 
ferring to me as an "expert." I may 
tell you (in strict confidence) that I 
know better, if he don't. But my 
feelings are touched ; and, disregard- 
ing the fate of the frog whose ideas 
of expansion were on a par with those 
of some people whom I have heard 
advocate spreading the United States 
over the rest of the earth, I will fire 
in all directions, as usual. And, if I 
fall too far short of the mark, kindly 
bestow at least a portion of the blame 
on him who Incited me. To one of 
my tender years, it is a aerious thing 
to be overrated, the more so when my 
untaught efforts may appear in the 
same issue with articles by men who 
really are experts, men whose ample 
mechanical bumps seem to have been 
supplemented by professional expe- 
rience as architects and contributors, 
besides " book larnin' " in plenty. 

So please caution your readers not 
to do it again, Mr. Editor. "Just 
tell them " that, far from pretending 
to expertness, I am but the voice of 
one crying in ignorance, hungering 
and tMrsting for truths — and the 
wAvs. That is something funny about 
me, must have the whys or I can't 
progress. Kind Nature dealt gen- 
erously by me in some respects (feet, 
for instance) ; but sue entirely omitted 
my monkey bump. I cannot ape. I 
was always a great hand to ask ques- 
tions ; so much so that, when I was 
knee breeches size, my mother became 
apprehensive lest I would grow up 
crooked, like this (?). Sometimes I 
feel resentful toward Nature for the 
omission aforesaid, because It leaves 
one under certain disadvantages. 
Thus, he is generally on the less 
popular side of a new question ; he 
c. n get neither his politics nor his 
religion from the daily papers ; and, 
when they try to "work" public 
sentiment in behalf of some fraud or 
other, as likely as not he takes the 
other track, and absolutely declines 
to be enthused. And then, in 
mechanical work, he is slower than 
the superficial man, the one who still 
retains the more prominent traits of 
his prehensile ancestry. There is a 
man in one of the St. Louis Locals, 
whom nature designed for a philoso- 
pher ; he is ireasoner ; good mechanic, 
too, but he cannot do enough to salt 
some foremen. Then, there is— but 
I had better " mosey back " to that 
board measure, It keeps bobbing 
up one way or another, and I am 
gl«d it does, because it shows that 
Mr. Wood's articles get the close 
attention of which they are worthy. 
Like any other man, Mr. W. has a 
right to put his own construction on 
his ambiguities, real or seeming. In 
" figuring " a board it is no trick to 
get the integral square feet, and the 
practical value of a process depends 
much on the accuracy and speed with 
which the fraction is obtained. So I 
said, and still say, that the process is 
interesting. The pencil is preferable 
in practice as it is much quicker and 
gives accurate iesults, The fractional 
error in question is about 9 per cent. 



as I temember it, remarkably close 
for such a method. 

This brings to mind another of 
those disadvantages consequent to 
having greatness thrus* upon you. 
My diagrams are not critically viewed. 
I'm so "expert," you know, 'tisn't 
worth while ; yet I blundered in 
tower-framing, Fig. 2, page rj, May 
Carpenter, where I said make 
H J — G. I., should be H f— H I. 
The whys were omitted to save space ; 
therefore the error was not easily seen 
by the reader. 

I like to see appreciation expressed 
for The Car tenter. It is well earned. 
Even where one is paid cash fordoing 
his part, that doesn't discharge our 
whole obligation to the well doer. 
An editor isn't insensible to a heart- 
felt "thank you," and it should be 
given when merited as a matter of 
honesty. Among other good things 
spread in the November Carpenter, 
I like the fatherly, practical, sensible 
articles by Mr. Leffingwell. They are 
rather more than we might expect in a 
trade journal, a trifleout of place some 
may think, but I'm grateful for the 
dislocation. But he says, ' ' Try to be 
somebody and you will succeed "How 
does he know but what we are already 
"somebody?" Try! How? Don't 
we spend our leisure (for instance) 
like we are somebody ? People who 
are just 'trying to be somebody 1 read, 
study, think every chance they get, 
but most of us just "gab," can or do 
play cards or checkers when we have 
spare moments. Guess I know what 
I'm talking about, for wasn't I up in 
the "reading room " of our District 
Council one day and there saw twenty- 
two men playing cards in tobacco 
smoke thick enough to cut, while two 
others were arguing .something about 
"taxation " ? Mr. I,, might have seen 
with one eye (through a crack in the 
smoke) what fraction of that sample 
gathering felt the need of being 
somebody. Come again, Mr. L , but 
don't put it quite so fiat, for though 
some of us may not be much ' ' pump- 
kins " we don't want the neighbors to 
know it ; moreover, naked truth our 
modesty offends. 

Earl Padgett. 
Union g$f t St. Louis, Mo. 



A Closet Around a Wash Basin. 



The above sketch shows a very 
handy arrangement for going round 
a wash basin, where the space or room 
is big -enough to allow it to go in, and 
any of the carpenters can make it at 
home. On each side of the wash 



□ 
□ 



basin and plumbing are three drawers, 
and a door covers the plumbing in the 
centre ; a solid board partition % 
thick should separate the drawers 
and plumbing on both sides. 



8 



THE CARPENTER, 

on 1H \L JuVl.N.v: iiF TUB 

United Brotherhood of Carpenters and 
Joiners of America, 

Publish*! .v,'««:> an Uu FtjttHttk t/ tech mamtk, 
.\ r 

V4* K. Ninth St., PlillH., Pa, 

P. J UCOflkB, l-Mitm finit I'utilislicr. 

Kiitere.l it the Fost oiti. r at Philadelphia, P»„ 
as sccoml-tMiiss m;ittrr. 

BctMCSIPMOIl Fkick : Fifty ctuts a yi-ar, in 
Hilvaiifr. postpaid. 

Aililrea-. nil letters anil money to 

i'. j. Mcortaa, 

Bo*tW4, Philadelphia, Pa. 



PHIL A , FI-BRl AKY, i8yy. 



Trades Unionism Its Detractors. 



BY SAM. I. LKl'FINtlWKI.I.. 

Hmm is no difficulty in con- 
vincirg any trade union- 
ist of his improved condi- 
tions ss compared with 
those existing before his 
entry Into and connection with this 
most holy of labor alliances. Any 
reflection which will excite the faint- 
est Inquiry will be conclusive in its 
results that, in bis former unorgan- 
ized state, he was as helpless as the 
infant newly born. Groping in the 
darkness and gloom of his hopeless 
surroundings the light of delivery 
came as a dawn of promise, inspiring 
new hopes and aspirations in a strug- 
gle against an apparently inevitable 
fate, /.wakened thought Infused by 
enlightenment heightened the expec- 
tation of a brighter destiny. 

"For all who sigh 
In servile chains, whate er their caste 
or creed ; 

For all mankind from bondage si all 
be freed, 

And from the earth be chased all 

forms of tyranny, 
God never made a tyrant or a slave." 

Some there are who say, " Yuur 
trade unionism will accomplish noth- 
ing. It is too slow. You are wasting 
your time. Come, join with us and let 
us revolutionize the world. Let us take 
possession of all the things that be 
and are to be and divide up, so that 
all will have an equal share." 

But, with the enlightenment of rea- 
son, the more conservative man thinks 
better of the possibilities It is the 
"now "he is interested in. He has 
no room in his thoughts for the wild 
freaks and vagaries of a whimsical 
philosophy which he can neither com- 
prehend nor utilize. He 1b up against 
a condition. It is the surroundings, 
the environments, the tyranny of cir- 
cumstances that confront Mm. Re- 
lief from the ills tL?t oppress him is 
what he most desi res. And if he is slow 
in the progress of his accomplish- 
ment, he reasons, with the philoso- 
pher, that "No great thing cometh 
suddenly into being ; not even a 
bunch of grapes can, or a fig. If you 
say to me now, 1 1 desire a fig,' I 
answer that there 5 need of time; 
let it first of all flower, and then bring 
forth fruit, and then ripen. When 
the fruit of a fig tree is not perfected 
at once, and in a single hour, would 
you win the fruit of a man's mind 
thus quickly and easily ?" 



Poverty is a fact ; wealth is a fact. 
These facts are factors that go to make 
life endurable and enjoyable. With 
advancing civili '.atiou the pauper and 
the millionaire go hand in hand. 
The wage labor class support both ; 
the pauper by taxes, the millionaire 
by tithes. The trade union move- 
ment is a war against poverty. It is 
a true leveler. It levels up. The power 
of organic ition is beginning to dawn 
upon the long betrayed and robbed 
masses. The producers are following 
in the pathway of light which will 
lead them from bondage to freedom. 
The trade union is the school of the 
mechanic in the science of govern- 
ment, fitting him for leadership in the 
army of labor, skilled and unskilled. 

Labor is an article of merchandise, 
bought and sold under the same rule 
of supply and demand as any other 
commodity in the market. Labor- 
strength— is ware ; but it fa more 
valuable than any other ware, because 
it is the ware that creates wares. J. ike 
any merchant that puts a price on his 
goods, the laboring man has a right 
to put a price on his labor. If the 
seller of any kind of goods cannot sell 
at his own price, he can keep his 
goods until a favorable chance comes 
to hand. Not so with the seller of 
labor-strength. If he cannot sell at 
his price, he is forced to sell below 
cost, which is the cost of living, or 
the expense of reproducing his labor- 
ing power from one day to another For 
his commodity will not keep, it will 
perish ; and, inasmuch as he cannot 
separate his goods, or hi? ware, from 
his body, it means physical decay to 
the owner. This is the position of the 
working man individually. Single, 
he is helpless Only by a combina- 
tion of many or all woTkingmen is it 
possible for them to withhold their 
ware from the market and to force up 
its price. This is practically the idea 
of trade unionism, 

Associations for the purpose of 
regulating the wages of their mem- 
bers by voluntary combined action are 
not of new discovery, but are as old 
as civilization. In the earliest times 
we find instances of such organiza- 
tions formed from motives of interest 
and policy, and the better to secure 
an adequate return for services ren- 
dered. 

The guilds of the Middle Ages 
limiting the number of apprentices to 
each artisan, and determining the 
period a man should serve before he 
could become a master, are examples, 
and from these, varying in many im- 
portant particulars, the trades unions 
of our day and titat have sprung. 

There can be no question about 
their utility. Whatever adverse views 
on the subject may be entertained by 
interested capitalists, there can be no 
doubt that the general results of trade 
unions have been, on the whole, con- 
ducive to the permanent moral eleva- 
tion and physical well being of the 
laboring classes. The matter has 
passed beyond the domain of hypothe- 
sis or speculation . A thousand specious 
arguments, designed to prove trade 
unionism Illusory and of no practical 
benefit, are demolished by the simple 
fact that trade unions are no untried 
theory, but subsisting and unques- 
tionable facts, 
With Buch substantial encourage- 



ment to increase our zeal in the work 
before us ; with the spread of enlight- 
enment to capitalism as well as in the 
held of labor ; with the improvement 
of conditions felt by every trade union- 
ist on his return to his home after his 
week of toil, in increased remuneration 
and fewer hours of labor and less strug- 
gle for existence — a new menace has 
sprung up in his path to thwart his 
purpose, and undo possibly the good 
which it has taken years to accom- 
plish. It is not a new combination 
of capital that thus threatens the 
progress of this great conservative 
movement, though the greed of 
monopoly would fill to satiety and 
gluttony upon the offals of a dead 
trade unionism \u, it is of men 
claiming to be of our own class but not 
of ou*- own family. Men who profess 
to fa^or reforms, the adoption of 
which would gladden the hearts of 
sensible trade unionists. Such as 
include state and municipal ownership 
of all public necessities. These meu 
are flattering and enticing in their 
proposals. Hting neither of us nor 
for us, they would have us set aside 
our well-builded fabric and follow 
them into a fanciful and chimerical 
I'topia, with the promise of enjoying 
the greatest perfection in politic?, 
laws, etc, These new dispensers of a 
balm (from (WIead, no doubt ) for the 
suffering ills of oppressed labor call 
themselves socialists Now, there is 
nothing new or destructive in social 
ism. liven a trade unionist is a 
socialist in that he joins with his 
fellows in methods for the betterment 
of his condition. But the class here 
spoken of has as many names and 
presents as many fronts as those of 
the inconstant moon in her recurring 
llirtations. It is purely political in 
its methods, and as often as defeated, 
so often changes its name -now 
Socialist Labor Party, then Social 
Democratic Party, then some other 
new fangled catch penny name — to 
capture the unwary, "comin' and 
goin'," just the same. One of its 
remedies is a " co operative common- 
wealth " another the abolishment of 
the ' ' wage system ' " for the ' ' co-opera- 
tive." To the writer the "coopera- 
tive" suggestion is so unreal in 
imagery, so chimerical such a mockery 
on common sense and judgment, as to 
be distrusted, even as an illusion, 
except in a condition beyond the 
grave, where co-operntion will be the 
rule, universally, and without excep- 
tion. 

As to substituting a cooperative 
system for a wage system, it will 
require ages to convince the ordinary 
mechanic that any stronger competi- 
tion than he has now to contend with, 
to maintain the scant wage of his 
laboi, will better his condition. What, 
with the rats and scabs and non-Union 
competition he is now striving to 
outlive and outdo, he can find no use 
for a system of glitter and tinsel so 
indefensible and untractable as is pro- 
posed by the class of star gazing 
"Socialists" and which is one of 
problematic conjecture. 

Trade Unionism, pure and simple, 
is good enough fo* any honest mean- 
ing man. Nearly one million of Its 
organized forces in this country to-day 
can attest the beneficence of its power 
and Influence. There is nothing to 



prevent a trade unionist from endor.s. 
ing any method of economic reform, 
national, state or municipal, nor 
from voting for what man or what 
measure his choice may lead him, 
only don't solicit him to absolve 
himself from the pure, conservative, 
unadulterated principles of an organi- 
zation which brings him pleasure in 
its fellowship, affection in its frater- 
nity and happiness in a realization of 
hopes secured in a unity as sacred as 
the Gospel or the Church. 



American Federation of Labor. 



III. 

F.STKKN'AL POMCV, 



BV MORTON A. A I I ' I : K'H , I'll .11. 

fc-^J 1 1 K exertions of the Federa- 
W flM tion to bring order and 

B ^| unity into the Trade Union 
Bkaadfl movement have all been to 
one chief end— to develop 
a Trade Union organization, which 
would give greater force to its 
demands. It remains to consider 
what these demands are. To under- 
stand the full significance of the 
policy of the Federation, one must 
bear in mind that it not only reflects 
the attitute of a large number of trade 
Unionists, but that, viewed from a 
political point of view, it is fairly 
typical of the opinions and desires of 
a large and active class of voters in 
our body politic. The chief external 
activities of the American Federation 
of Labor may be grouped under two 
main heads : first, the promotion of 
trade matters which are ordinarily 
reserved to the individual Trade 
Unions, and secondly, the attainment 
of labor legislation. 

Certain departments of Trade Union 
activity lie, strictly, outside the scope 
of the Federation. The Federation 
has nothing to do with the insurance 
of workmen by Trade Unions, further 
than to suggest its value. The power 
of initiative in such trade matters as 
boycotts, the use of the Union label, 
and strikes, is also reserved to the 
individual Trade Unions. Vet the 
Federation gives its support to the 
policy already fixed by the Unions; 
and this support may be very con- 
siderable, 

Boycotts, which the Federation had 
once or twice endorsed in the preced- 
ing years, first began to occupy an 
important place in its policy in 1SH7, 
When the Federation approves a boy- 
cott, it undertakes to make the fact 
that the employer in question has 
been declared unfair, as widely known 
as possible. Lists of such employers 
are printed each month in the Ameti- 
t an Fedetationist under the heading, 
"We don't patronize." lispecially 
in cases where a strike is impracti- 
cable, for example, when an employer 
refuses to employ workmen who are 
members of a Trade Union, the 
Federation regards the boycott as an 
effective means of warfare. While all 
Trad" Unionists support the boycott 
in principle, there is a strong feeling 
that it is most effective when used 
nparingly. At first the number of 
firms boycotted was so great that 
workmen could not remember them ; 
but since 1893 the Federation has 



THE CARPENTER. 



General Officers 

OF TUB 

United Brotherhood of Carpenters and 
Joiners of America. 

Office of the General Secretary, 
124 N. Ninth St , Philadelphia, Pa 



r.enerul President -John Williams. tTlica, 

N. V. 

ficneisl Secretary-Treasurer.— f*. J. KCQtJI <K, 
V. O. Hoi hsi, Philadelphia, P«. 

C.KMKHAL VlCI-i'm MI.K.NTS. 

Mf»t vte#>*»r*aW«it w. i>. Hui.er. <x, Wsverty 
at., Y.mkent, ft, Y. 

Second Vice-President - William Itauer, Silt} 
W. Polk St., Chicago, til. 

SttMEKAt I'xurnvl: ROAXD. 

(All orrespondence fur the n. F. II must tie 
mailed to th« G*tKf»1 Secretary -Treasurer, ) 

James M Ml**, 399 W. IIHUi *t„ New York, NY 
I. K Millet. JtltS Olive at., St. Louis Mo. 

A C. Catt Tin ull. lOUt W. wttth »t., Sta, P. .Chicago, 
l-ri if. Wal/, IXi'l Hroad St., Hartford, Cuun. 
W J. Williams, 171) Mill a It., Atlanta, f'.a. 



American Federation of Labor. 

{Con/imtfif ) 



attempted to concentrate the atten- 
tion of its members on the boycotting 
of a few leading firms. It should be 
added that the Federation does its 
best to administer this system of boy- 
cotts fairly. Its executive council 
never approves the application of a 
Trade Union for a boycott until the 
firm involved has been given oppor- 
tunity to present its side of the case. 
The executive council also attempts to 
bring about a settlement of the dis- 
pute leading to the boycott— with 
such success that President Gompers 
reports that fully one- third of the 
cases are thus adjusted without its 
becoming necessai/ to put the firm on 
the "unfair list." 

The UBeof the "Union Isabel M to 
designate goods manufactured under 
conditions satisfactory to the Trade 
Union, originated by the cigar makers 
in 1874, has since become very gen- 
eral. In iS<j7 the Federation, besides 
having its own label, endorsed the 
labels of twenty-seven National 
Trade Unions. The "Union Label," 
like the boycott, is a means of dis- 
criminating against " unfair " firms, 
but its effectiveness goes farther. By 
promoting the demand for goods 
marked " Union made," it is calcu- 
lated to lead employers to give the 
preference to Trade Union workmen 
in order to secure the right to use the 
" Union Label." The absence of this 
label from an article of common use, 
and especially from articles like beer 
or tobacco, seriously interferes with 
its sale among workingmen. "This 
weapon [the Union Label]," says 
President Gompers, "is productive of 
good result* with the expenditure of 
less energy than any other at the 
command +* labor." While the 
establishment and control of "Union 
Labels " is wholly in the hands of 
the National Trade Unions, the 



Federation does what it can to encour- 
age the purchase of "Union Label" 
goods. 

The Federation regards stiikes, in- 
cluding ' sympathetic ' strikes, as in- 
evitable under present conditions. 
Those strikes in which the employers 
refuse to treat with committees of 
their workmen appeal especially to 
the workingman. The president's 
annual reports, however, urge the 
Trade Unions to show discrimination 
and learn when not to strike, — when 
they are improperly organized, or on 
a falling market, or when they have 
an empty treasury. The ordering and 
conduct of strikes is a power which 
the individual Trade Unions prefer to 
keep in their own hands. Strikes for 
the enforcement of the eight hour 
working day. however, while ordered 
as usual by the Unions, have been 
planned in conference with the Fed- 
eration. The eight ho t day ia so 
universally desired by Trade Unionists 
that the Federation, by general con- 
sent, has assumed the leadership of 
the eight-hour movement. 

At the Federation convention of 
1884, a general strike for the eight- 
hour day was planned to take place 
May 1, 1 886, Fiach organization was 
to determine for itself whether it 
would join the movement Four of the 
national Trade Unions a fit Hated with 
the Federation entered the fight for 
the eight-hour day. Of these, the 
cigarm^kers and the German printers 
were successful; the furniture workers 
compromised on nine hours ; and the 
carpenters won the eight hour c*ay in 
seven cities, and compromised on nine 
hours in eighty- four cities. 

Two years later the Federation be- 
gan a renewed attempt to secure the 
eight-hour working day in 1890, by 
devoting the year i88ytosueh system- 
atic preparation as had never been 
known in the American Trade Union 
movement before. It collected in- 
formation from the various Unions as 
to their strength, especially their 
financial resoutces, and their readi- 
ness to strike for the tight hour day 
and it threw its whole strength into 
a vigorous campaign to make more 
real to thewoikmen the ideal of eight 
hours for work. It distributed eight- 
hour tracts by Messrs. Lemuel Dan- 
ryid, George Gun ton and George E. 
McNeill ; it sent out several speakers 
and appointed four days on which 
mass meetings In favor of the imme- 
diate enforcement of the demand for 
the eight hour day should be held all 
over the country. On September 2, 
iSSy, such meetings were held in four 
hundred and twenty cities and towns, 
It may be worth while, even at the 
risk of undue digression, to consider 
the arguments for the eight hour day 
which were advanced In this campaign 
of the Federation. 

Great stress was laid, as might be 
expected, on the social value, as well 
as the value to the Individual work- 
man, of Increased leisure. But another 
argument was given prominence, well 
calculated to make the eight-hour 
movement popular. All the writers 
of the eight-hour tracts proclaimed 
that shorter hours brought higher 
wages. As the rhyme expressed it, 

" Whether you work by the piece, or work by 
the day. 

Dtrrea-hit. the hours increase* the pay." 



Up to this time workmen in Am eric 
had usually been more ready to strike 
to maintain or increase wages than to 
reduce the hours of work below ten, 
at the riak of any reduction of wages. 
But here was a mode of reasoning 
which avoided this disagreeable 
dilemma by telling the workman that 
he could have at once more leisure 
and more pay. The argument in sup- 
port of this statement was as follows: 
"The adoption of an eight-hour day 
would tend to increase wages in two 
ways, first, by reducing enforced idle- 
ness; second, by increasing new wants 
and raising the standard of living." 

All the Federation writers distinctly 
repudiated the assertion, made so 
much of by many economists, that a 
workman would do as much work in 
eight hours as he now does in ten. 
They maintained, on the contrary , 
that the shortening of the working 
day would lessen the amount produced 
daily by each workman, and, therefore, 
lead generally to the employment of 
more workmen, — as It undoubtedly 
would in the case of many workmen, 
such as railroad employees, whose 
work is of the nature of personal ser- 
vices. This increased demand for 
labor would, it was argued, result 
both in a rise in wages and in a reduc- 
tion of the number of the unemployed. 

Workmen believe that this increased 
demand for labor under the eight-hour 
system will help counteract the Im- 
mediate effect of the rapid introduc- 
tion of machinery, which operates to 
throw workmen out of employment 
not only directly, but, as they believe, 
indirectly also, by causing overpro- 
duction and industrial depression. 
They demand the eight-hour day, 
therefore, as a form of compensation 
for the hardship which they believe 
the rapid introduction of machinery 
brings upon them. In another way 
workmen see a close relation be- 
tween the introduction of machinery 
and their demand for shorter hours. 
They base the demand on their right 
to share in the increased production 
which the invention of machinery has 
made possible. Contrary to the general 
belief, the American Federation of 
Labor has never opposed the Intro- 
duction of machinery. Of course, 
individual trade unionists protest 
against the machines which have 
made their skilled hand labor worth- 
less, as other people oppose legislation 
which interferes with their personal 
or corporate Interests. Even these 
workmen feel, however, as one dele- 
gate expressed it, " We could not go 
on record as fighting machinery," 
and every workman realizes that the 
introduction of machinery is inevit- 
able. The Federation, therefore, in- 
stead of entering upon a Quixotic 
fight against the introduction of ma- 
chinery, seeks to obtain for the work- 
man a greater share in the resulting 
increase of national wealth, in the 
shape of better conditions of work, 
higher wages and shorter hours. 

The Trade Union arguments for the 
eight-hour working day stand thus : 
It will benefit society as well as the 
workmen ; it will make it easier for 
workmen to find employment ; it will 
Increase wages; and finally, it is 
only "fair" that In this way the 
workmen should share In the progress 
due to the genius of invention. 



In good degree owing to the eight- 
hour agitation of the American Federa- 
tion of Labor, the workman's latent 
desire for the eight hour day Is becom- 
ing what Mill would have called 
" effective. " Already President Gora 
pers can say with truth, "The fore- 
most demand of the organized labor 
movement is for a shorter workday " 

In the eight- hour strike of 1886 the 
Federation had merely given its moral 
support to all the striking Trade 
Unions; but in i8yo it adopted a far 
better strategic plan. It singled out 
the carpenters as the trade in which a 
strike for eight hours gave the most 
promise of success, and concentrated 
its efforts in the financial support of 
the strike of the United Brotherhood 
of Carpenters and Joiners. For the 
first time the Federation levied a 
strike assessment, which enabled it to 
give the carpenters over twelve thou- 
sand dollars toward the expenses of 
their strike. As a result of this strike, 
46,197 carpenters enjoyed shorter 
hours of work and the eight hour day 
became the general rule in several 
large cities. At the same time eight- 
hour strikes were also successful In 
several other industries. Ti e plan of 
the Federation was to continue to aid 
eight-hour strikes of one National 
Trade Union after another, as they 
became strong enough to demand the 
eight-hour day. Further effort has, 
however, been frustrated by the in- 
dustrial depression since 1 893. 

Workmen may obtain the eight-hour 
day, not only by voluntaty concession 
of employers and by direct Trade 
Union action, as in the eight hour 
strikes of 1S86 and 1890, but also by 
legal enactment. The Federation has 
done much to secure the enforcement 
of the Act of iSOij granting the eight- 
hour day to most government em- 
ployees, and to secure extensions of 
this law to apply to letter, carriers 
and to workmen employed by govern- 
ment contractors. It also urges the 
passage of similar laws for state, 
county, and municipal employees. 

The convention of 1894 endorsed 
the demand for a national law, limit- 
ing the daily hours of work of all 
workmen to eight. It was recognized 
that an amendment to the Constitu- 
tion to permit Congress to legislate 
on hours of labor would first be neces. 
sary. This was the first time that the 
Federation had given its support to 
the proposal to limit the hourB of 
labor of adult male workmen, In all 
occupations, by law. 



Impressions. 

The t-uch of 1 hand, the glance of an eye, 
Or a word ezcha< ged with a panarr hy > 
K gllrapte of a face in a crowded street 
And afterwards life is i ncomplete ; 
A picture painted with honest zeal 
And we lose the old for the new ideal , 
A chance remark or a song'a refrain. 
And life is never the same again. 

An angered word from our lip* In sped 

Or a tender word in left unsaid. 

And one there is who, hla whole life long, 

Shall cherish the brand of a burning wrong , 

A line that «.v« up from an open page. , 

A cyulc sin i It- from the llpa of age, 

A glimpse of loving seen In a play, 

Aud ihe dreams oi our youth are swept away. 

A filendly smile aud love'a embering spark 
Leaps into Maine and illumines the dark ; 
A whispered " He Ijrave " to our fellow men 
Aud they pick up the thread of hope again. 
Thus never an act or a word or a thought 
But that with ungueased importance la fraught. 
Pot small thtngt build up eternity 
And blaion the nays for a deitiny. 



10 



THE CARPENTER. 



Agitation for Model Tenement Build- 
ins* at Cincinnati, Ohio. 




N our days of extreme poverty 
of the great masses and gnat 
wealth for the very few. 
together with our unjust 
system of landlordism. whicli 
enables a few persons of wealth to 
buy up nil desirable lots and land, in 
and around all large cities, deprives 
many of us toiling workmen ftom 
ever owning a home, and so many of 
us who have families and must have 
a suitable place to live in, must de- 
pend upon landlords for living places, 
and their sole object seems to be to 
exflct from us as much rent as they 
possibly can, and insist that two bare 
living rooms are good enough for a 
common workman to live in. But we 
are not satisfied with this, and should 
not be. Since new inventions and 
cheap pro duction have brought many 
other things within the reach of the 
poorer clases, so can also comfortable 
living places, with a few of the most 
modern conveniences, be brought 
within our reach, if it is gone about 
in a proper and business like manner 
in providing them. 

One great trouble in providing 
tenement buildings is, that every 
little landlord who has a small lot of 
his own, puts up a building according 
to his own queer design, and the 
result is an arrangement of odd shaped 
houses as varied as the ideas of the 
different owners, all of whom may 
have been anything else but a practi- 
cal builder. 

The greatest part of our city is 
built up of Just tL Is kind of buildings, 
and our Carpenters' District and 
Building Trades Councils have deter- 
mined to overcome some of these 
di Sic ul ties, and bring about the erec 
tion of a better class of tenement 
buildings in which nice, new, clean 
four- room living apartments, with 
bath and closet, can be rented at 
about the same rate of rent which is 
now charged for two or thrfp We 
rooms. 

A joint committee was appointed, 
consisting of five of the ablest mem- 
bers from each council, and this com- 
mittee of ten set to work at once by 
providing themselves with the plans 
of about twenty different enterprises 
that are now providing comfortable 
homes for thousands of families in 
Boston, Brooklyn, New York and in 
the principal cities of ICurope. After 
selecting the good features from many 
of these plans, and in compiling them 
into one plan we found that buildings 
of this character must be erected upon 
a large scale for several reasons, 
namely, it gives more scope in plan- 
ning the apartments to the very best 
advantage, it makes it possible to 
give outside light and air to all the 
rooms, halls and bath rooms in the 
entire building. One central light 
court, or one stairway, or one light 
shaft will answer for two distinct 
parts of the building. An ordinary 
priced inside lot will answer the pur- 
pose just as well as a high priced 
corner lot, and that building materials 
can be purchased at much less cost 
when ordering in large quantities. 
Guiding itself by these rules the 
committee drafted a plan and received 
estimate,) for its construction and then, 



making liberal allowance for taxes, 
insurance, repairs, etc , and 6 per 
cent, profit for the money invested in 
both building and lot, it was found 
that the rent that would have to be 
charged for the living apartments 
would be astonishingly low. 

The committee is now in coiinnum- 
cation with parties who intend to 
erect buildings of this character in 
the coming season, and we are recom 
mending the adoption of our plan, 
which, if it will be done, the committee 



If this work can be extended to 
supply the demand for homes of this 
kind, with possibly the cooperative 
feature added, it would do a world of 
good to our toiling masses of deserv- 
ing workers, many of whom are 
devoting their entire lives to pro- 
ducing the comforts and luxuries of 
others and yet have nothing them- 
selves. 

The sketch here shown is that of 
the lloor plan ol the second story and 
all lloorsabove. it beinj; optional with 




BEDROOM 




nrn 
room 



~1 "Ol 




. El 
KITCHEN 



BED 
BOOM 



OPEN 
LIGHT 
COURT 



\ 



t 


[ i 


I — 18*4*- 


DINING 


KITCHEN 




ROOM 










. BD . 




. rt i 










|aD&Li|^ji.'f.iI 


BWtj fj sky LIGHT | 






. J 






\ I) ED 






* 

J 


r ROOM 


PARLOR 




h 






1 



— 0'3"* 



Model Tenement Building. 

PI,AN PREPARED AND RICCOMM BKDBD BY THE JOINT INDUSTRIAL 
homes COMMITTEE OF THE CARPENTERS' DISTRICT AND 
BUILDING trades councils, of Cincinnati, a 

[rUl plan provides foi two slmes and leu lour-rooni living apartments, ■ rid la iiafgtfil for 
a WalOO foot inside 1st, ila.imii will ever cost of tot «nrl bull. hug. cm which ii per cent pr fit 
can Iip realued by the stores renting at |lo ■ mouth gild the living u i.a 1 1 mrnt, it the low rate 
of an average ol I- a maul li each | 



will require that none but Union me- 
chanics be employed In its construc- 
tion. This work which the two coun- 
cils have undertaken, 1b distinctly of 
the progressive kind, for, instead of 
waiting for work to come to us, we are 
going ahead and creating work to do, 
and when the work is done we can 
move our families into better homes. 
Not only we building mechanics, but 
men of any other calling have the 
same opportunity of securing living 
apartments that are pleasant, cheer- 
ful, comfortable and which make life 
worth living. 



owner to add as many stories as 
he :nay desire. 

The entrance to the open light court 
is through a d-foot hallway running 
the entire length through the center 
of the building, giving access to the 
court bom the street or from the rear 
yard. 

Joint Industrial Homes Committee 
of Carpenters' District and Build- 
ing Trades Councils. 

J. H. Meyer, Sec'y. 
23 Metcer street. 

Cincinnati, O , Jan. to, 1899. 



Rife, Hour Cities. 



Below is a li.t of the cities and towns whrv 
carpenters make it a rule to work only etglit 
hours a day I 

Morphyaboro, m. 

Newark, N J. 

. rw Brighton, v Y 
Newtown, x. v 
Ni-w V01 k. N. Y. 
< lakhtmt, Cal. 

Oak Park, III. 
Omaha* Nrt>. 

< ir.tnge, N. J. 
Ouray, Cot 
rusmieiiH. Cat. 
Part Richmond, N. v. 
Pueblo, Col 
Kan<t«burg. Cal. 

Koeheslel, N V. 

Roger* t'aik.. ill, 
Sri ramento. Cat 

Sail 1.4k-- I IhIi. 
Sail A Bit 1 mo Tea. 
San l-ranrisro, I' ill. 

Han Liiia • ihtapo, Oat. 
sa 11 I'.v, Cat. 
hHii Rafael, Cat 
SiiutH Bartiata, Cat 
semt>. Wash 
Sheboygan Wis. 
Mouth Chicago, lit. 
suuih Denver, Col. 
South Kvanston HI. 
South Kngti wood. III. 
soui h 1 hnaha Neb, 

S|it>kaiir. \C.,*h. 
spi ingheld. tit. 
St. I.ouis, Mo. 

mapteton, N V. 

Mockton. Cal 

Hwampscott Muss. 

Svraeusr X V. 
T'jm City, T< a 
Town ol Lake. 111. 

Tramont, n y. 

tnionport, N Y. 
Van Nest N Y 
Venice. 111. 
Victor, Col. 
WaCO, Tex. 

Wastn ngton, D. C. 

Weslihestrr N Y. 
Whatcom, *va*h. 
Willianisl.rulge. N. Y, 
Wirfiitliiwn. N. Y, 
Vonkers. N. Y. 



Alameda, Cal. 
A, la 1.011111. i'ca 

Ashland, wis 

Austin, 111. 
BakeTstield, Cal 
Bedford Park, N. Y. 
Hei keley, Cat, 

Beasemci Col. 
Brighton Park 111. 
Brooklyn, N. v. 
Caronualcl, Mo. 
Uhlcago, III 
Chicago Unpins, in 
Ctaeela ml, 1 ». 

Corona, N. V. 
Cripple Creek, Col. 
I leaver. Col. 
Drtr.iit, Mich 
Kusl SI I.ouis. Ill 
Kl Ii 'in. Col, 
Kltntiutst, 111. 
Kugtewnoil, III, 
Kureka, Cal. 
KvauatoB, 111 
Pluahl un. n. v. 
Premont, Pol, 
Preano. c»i 

( '.a I vest 011, Tea. 
r.ilette. COl 
Grand Crossing, 111 
Haitgh rille. I no. 
Haufotd, i»i 
Highland Park, ill. 
Hitchcock, Tea. 
Ili le IMtk. 111. 
Independence, Col. 
Indian 1 i>olis. Ind, 
IrviiiLt* on. N I, 

k tnaai City, Mo. 
Kemin gtou. ill 
KitigsSridge. H. Y. 
La Junta, Col. 
Lake I-orest. Ill 
Leadville, Col. 

Long Mami City, N 

l,os Artgele*. Cat. 
I.vtin, M*M. 
Mivwimt, III. 
Memphis, Tetin. 
Milwaukee, Wis. 
Moorelaud. III. 
Ml. Vernon. N, Y. 
ML Vernon, tad, 



Total in,, citiea. 



Rules Regarding Apprentices. 



At the Detroit Convention of the Cnllerl Broth- 
erhood or Carpenters and Joiner* of America, 
held August H-il, Ihw, tne following rulei i n rela. 
•ion lo apprentice* wi re approved, and the Local 
I'niona are urged lo secnte their enfurcement : 

IVhn/as, T!i- rapid tnflui of unskilled and in- 
comiietent men in Ihe carpenter trade haa had 
of late yeara, a ^ery deprenstiig and injurioua 
effect upon the mechanic* in the t.iniiiess, and 
ha* a tendency to ilegraile thg aUndasd of aklll 
and to give nn encouragement to young men lo 
tiecome appreoticea and lo master the trade 
thoroughly ; therefore, in the beat inlereata ol 
the craft, we declare ouraelvei In favor ofthelol 
lowing rulea i 

Skctiom 1. The Itidinluring of apprenticea la 
the ties! means calculated lo give that efficiency 
which It ta desirable a caipeuter should pos&eaa. 
■nd also lo give the necessary guarantee to the 
employet a that Home return will tie made to them 
for a proper effort lo turn out competent work- 
1 11 . therefore, we direct I hat all I.»m-kI t'niona 
under our jurisdiction shall use every jioaaihle 
meana. wherever practical, to introduce the aye- 
tun of Indenturing apprentice*. 

HKC, '1. Any boy or peraoii hereafter engaging 
himself lo learn the trade i I carpentry, shall be 
required lo aerve a regular apprenticeship ol 
four . onset 1 Hive yeara, and shall not he cons Id - 
ered a journeyman unless he has complied with 
this rule, and is twenty one yeara ol age at the 
completion of hia apprenticeship 

Site. 3 All boya entering the empenter trade 
with Ihe Intention of learning the business shall 
be held by agreement, Indenture or written con- 
tract for ■ leim of four yeara. 

SRC 4 When a hoy shall have contracted with 
an employer to serve a certain term of yeara, he 
•hall, on no pretense whatever, leave said em- 
ployer anil contract with another, without the 
full and free conacnt of aaid first employer, 
unleaa there la juat cauarnr that such change la 
made In consequence or the death or relinquish- 
ment of busitieaa by the first employer ; any ap- 
prentice so leaving ahall not be permitted to 
work under the jurisdiction of any I.ocal Union 
In our Brotherhood, hut shall be required to re- 
turn to his employer and nerve out hi* appren- 
ticeship 

BBC. f>. It It enjoined upon each Local Onion 
to make regulations limiting the number of ap- 
prentices to lie employed in each shop or mill to 
one for auch numher of journeymen as may 
aeem to them juat; and all Unions are recom- 
mended lo admit to membership apprentices In 
the last year ol their apprenticeship, to the end 
that, upon the expiration of their term* of ap- 
prenticeship they may become acquainted with 
the workings of the Union, and be better Sued 
to appreciate ils privileges and obligations upon 
r full membership. 



THE CARPENTER. 



11 



A Series of Drawing Lessons. 



BY D, U, STODHARI). 




Lissom No. i. 

RAWING Is of 
great value 
to the entire 
human race. 



But u n - 
doubtedly of 
more value 
to the car- 
penter than 
any other trade, calling or profession, 
except the artist that makes big 
money and his life's work of drawing 
alone, 



many difficulties. A man in a job 
shop that can at once take out his 
pencil and nicely show the customer 
just what they want, will have a great 
deal more to do than the man that 
cannot draw at all. 

The Carpenter has had many 
valuable lessons on drawing, ex- 
plaining in full the drawing board 
and instruments and illustrating 
plans and elevations. That ground 
has been so thoroughly covered that 
I will not touch it, only lightly. 

Again the carpenter sees so much 
of houses he likes to see something 
else In the way of education through 
his official organ, and I have tried to 
arrange a series of practical lessons 







making finished drawings with India 
ink use Glllott's ^03 pen. 

Practice the line exercises and then 
make the drawings complete with ink 
or pencil and send to me for examina- 
tion and I will try and help you from 
lime to time. Some may say they 
can never learn to draw, but don't 
give up until you try. Remember, 
house drawing is easy, fruit is harder, 
animal harder still, and the human 
face hardest of all. Now let us get 
right down to work and make the 
hardest first and then take up easy 
carpenter drawing later on. Remem 
ber, there Is no danger of learning too 
much, and there's always room at 
the top. But there's not much room 
for the man that can only saw to 
someone else's line, we must learn to 
do something ourselves. Practice all 
these drawings, then draw everything 
you can see. Get T square and draw- 
ing board and be ready for our next 
lesson which will be mechanical. 



\ 



I finished my time as an apprentice 
and voted several times before I ever 
had any knowledge of drawing what- 
ever. 1 learned the necessity of 
drawing In the carpenter trade, there- 
fore ccnituenced to gather here and 
there a knowledge of what I had so 
long neglected. 

Soon after I gained some knowledge 
of drawing I was paid 50 cents an 
hour to prepare drawings for the 
World's Fair. I then thought that a 
great price, but since then much ol 
my time has brought me that 
imount. 

A carpenter with a knowledge of 
irawing can Bee much further In his 
roTk than the uneducated in the art, 
and, therefore, saves getting into 



for the carpenter and his family, 
entirely practical and yet far away 
from the real house, enough 30 the 
carpenter can educate and yet not 
Lave his mind on a house alt the 
time. 

I have spent much time and thought 
In preparing something educational 
and interesting to the carpenter's 
family, and I firmly believe that any 
one that follows these lessons through 
the different lines of drawing, Includ- 
ing freehand, mechanical, geometri- 
cal, outline, detail, object, perspec- 
tive, architectural, etc., will gain a 
knowledge that will always be of 
value to them. 

In my little freehand sketch I show 
the position of hand and pen ; when 



A Plea for the Locals. 

let us keep the Locals up, 
And push th> m with a song ! 

Tin noble hearts and toilers' hands 
That move the world along 

On Honor'*) aide we've set our staff ; 

Sow struggle to be free 
Prcm Marnmon'a grasp, whose Gorgon eye 

Hut shackle Liberty. 

Tit Love alone will win the day ; 

L'nharrassed by a fear 
she binds the wounds we feel the most 

And checks the rising tear. 

When arm in arm we feel the sway 

Of L"nit>"s embrace 
We 11 dare to speak ami act like men— 

Proud of a toiler's face. 

When anger dies, and with it fella 

All cowardice, Hope laves 
Within the gorgeous lieann that rise. 

And ahine across their graves. 

'Tis only then that « e can win 
From foes behind ihe shield 

01 slinking justice, free to bind 
And force the poor to yield. 

So let us keep our Locals up, 

And rally in our might. 
And show the bosses th it the men 

Are heroes in the right. 

In unity there lies our hope ! 

"Tis plain before our Uvea 
We must unite, if we attempt 

To guard our homes nn<l wives. 

Jt)HN Hi Kj* RRHLL, 

/oca I., j. 




Tools and How to Use 
Them. III. 



BY OWEN B. MAG1NN1S. 



(Copyright, i8y8) 




N sharpening a plane iron on 
the grindstone the beginner 
must guard against giving 
too long a bevel to his plane 
irons, that is, making too 
thin an edge ; for, although a thin 
edge cuts well, some steel is very apt 
to hreak at hard knots in the wood ; 
and if we have a thin edge, it may 
take a long rubbing on the oilstone to 
take out the nick, or we may even 
have to resort to the grindstone 
again. 




Fit;. i2. 

The edge is made keen by holding 
the iron between the fingers of both 
hands and keeping it at the cutting 
angle, to rub it gently back and for- 
ward on the surface of the stone, until 
it has the edge turned over on the 
face of the iron ; the face is then 
lightly rubbed flat on the face of the 
oilstone, and the iron has the wire 
edge or burr remaining, removed by 
whetting it on the hand In the way 
shown in Fig. 12, thus making the 
edge clean and kten. 




Fig. 13, 

Concerning the method of setting 
the iron in a plane, the following will 
explain it : To loosen the iron in a 
jack plane, fore plane or jointer, the 
front of the plane must be struck 
with the hammer on the ebony sharply 
or boxwood plug inserted on the top 
of the plane to receive the blow. This 
will loosen the wedge and release the 
iron. To Insert and sef the iron place 
the iron in the ihroat and the wedge 
upon it gently, tapping the wedge to 
hold it temporarily. Now proceed to 
turn the plane upside down as in Fig. 
13, and sighting with the eye across 
the sole or bottom face, proceed to 
adjust the iron until the desired pro 
jection is obtained. 

PATENT ADJUSTABLE WOOD 1' LANES 

These planes are adjusted by a 
lever, are especially adapted for work- 
ing on soft woods, and they are re- 
markably simple in their parts, not 
more expensive to purchase than the 
ordinary wooden planes, and have 
{Continued on next page.) 



12 



THE CARPENTER. 



Carpenters' Tools. 

(Continued from page "■) 



been so improved that the artisan 
has found them to be excellent on 
both hard and soft woods. They can 
be purchased from the publisher of 
this little boot. Figs, 14, 15. 1(1 and 
17 ate excellent cuts of these planes 




PJO 14. 

Smooth plane, S inches in length, 
1 : / Inch cutter. 




Fig 15 

Handlesmooth, iu inches in length, 
2's inch cutter. 




Fig 16. 

Jack plane, 15 inches In length, 2 '* 
Inch cutter. 

Fore plane. 20 inches in length, 2 }$ 
inch cutter. 

Jointer plane, 26 inches in le .gth, 
2 <s inch cutter. 




HON OR STRia PCANES. 

Fm. 18 

SMOOTH Pl.ANKS. 

h on. —(Bailey Pattern.) 

inch long, i'4 Inch cutler, 
inch long, li* inch cutler, 
H inch tang, inch cutler. 
1) inch Ioiik, - inch cutter. 
IU inch long, 2 inch cuttc. 

St Stanley Pattern ) 
Uinch long, 31. Inch cutter. 




Fig. 19 

J 11K I'i.axr.- (Bailey Pattern ) 
1 1 i-nii long, 2 inch cutler, 
JACK Plank.- Stanley 1'i.tlern .] 
II hich long, inch cutti-r. 

1'ORK Pl.ANHS. 

is inch loiift. 2 l i inch cultc. 

JOINTRH P I . A N K. 

21 inch long, 2 ! . im-h cutter 
24 inch long, 2\ inch cutler. 

Steel and iron planes are now in 
use, and are favorably received and 
having a large sale. We show a jack 
plane of this manufacture in Fig. ig. 
Fore planes, jointers and smooth 
planes as Fig. 18 are also made. 
The advantages claimed for them are 
beauty of style and finish, great con- 
venience in operating, economy in 
use and the fact that they are self- 
adjusting in every respect, and each 
part interchangeable &z that should 
any part be broken or lost a new 
duplicate part may be obtained at a 
small cost, thus maintaining the 
efficiency o r the plane. 



STANLEY S TATENT LATERAL 
ADJUSTMENT. 

Fig 17. 

The sections! view of a plane illustrates the 
new method of adjust turf a plane Iron, iideuihe, 
toi-et the cutting edge Madly square with the 
face of the plane. 

At the tower end of ihe lever, n revolving 
( iint i -friction) disc tils into the slot in the plane 
iron, thus furnishing an easy tddewise adjust- 
ment, entirely Independent of the forward «ud 
back ward adjustment of the cutter. 

Thia tever for slilewlse adjustment, as shown 
above-, la attached to all patent iion planes and 
patent wood planes, except Noa. 1, U and tl, 1 
will also he found attached to block planes, see 
farther on, 




a 



Fig. 20. 

The planes which are most in de- 
mand next to the bench planes are 
termed as Fig. 20. The sizes of the 
beads used by the carpenter vary 
by !s of an inch from a plane which 
forms a bead an inch In width, to j s 
of an inch in width. When a bead is 
worked entirely round the edge it is 
said to be "returned." The edges of 
window and door casing? are often 
beaded, as are also the joints of nar- 
row boards in partitions, ceilings, and 
wainscotings. They may be pur- 
chased in sizes as 

! ., i-16, «, W#, ft, T-ln. X, Hi % 7 -. 1 'Tl'- 
Good bead planes have the eilgi s of the groove 
which is to make the bead reinforced lor lined) 
with hard Boxwood, or as Flauemakers would 
say : '"Hood Ilt-ad Planes should be RaxtA." 

Single boxed bead planes have a prot cling 
strip of Boxwood on one side of the bead 
groove. 

Double boxed bead planes have two pro- 
tect log strips of Boxwood, one on each tide of 
'he bead groove. 

Solid box " dovetailed " head planes have 
their bead groove cut out of the solid Boxwood, 
a solid piece of which had been " dovetailed " or 
mortised into the length of the plane. 

These planes are held in the same 
way as the smoothing plane but care 
must be taken so as to prevent the 
cutter from slipping oil the edge and 
marring the work. The cutter or bit 
of these planes is sharpened with the 
set slip which will be explained 
further on. 





The No. 5 Union Combination Self- 
Fe l Rip and Cross-Cut Saw. 



HIS machine is almost a 
complete " workshop '* in 
one machine. It is suitable 
for ripping up to 3 % inches 
thick, also for cross-cutting, 
mitering. rabbeting, grooving, da- 
doing, edging up and with the extra 
attachments, boring, scroll sawing, 
edgt. moulding, beading, etc. 

It has a large adjustable combination 
wood and iron table, 28 x 36 inches. 
Steel shafts and Babbitt metal lines 
cap boxes, adjustable for wear. Ad- 
justable extension rolls for long work. 
Three changes of feed. Four changes 
of speed. Foot power with a walking 
motion. Hand power at rear of ma- 
chine, leaving a free table. Oulck 
change from self feed ripping to cross- 
cutting. Two, each, rip and cross-cut 
gauges. Every machine and attach- 
ment guaranteed practical and accu- 
rate. Send for Catalogue "A" which 
fully describes a complete line of wood 
working machinery. 

Manufactured by the Seneca Falls 
Manufacturing Company, 22 Water 
street, Seneca Falls, N. V., U. S. A. 



the depth of the rebate, for of course 
when the iron has cut down the wood 
till the stop touches the top surface 
of the stuff, it is prevented from cut- 
ting deeper. The cutter is a little 
knife point just under the left end of 
the guard. As it runs before the cut- 
ting edge when the plane is in use, it 
prevents the iron from leaving a furry 
side to the cut. The piece below can 
be moved by means of the two slots, 
and set by the screws so as to regu- 
late the width of the rebate. A com- 
mon instance of rebating is in the 
jamb of the ordinary door frame to 
which the door is hinged, and into 
which It closes. 

Rabbet planes are used by holding 
the rear part as in the case of the 
smoother and the front with the left 




Fig. St. 

The rebate or rabbtt plane, Fig. 21, 
is used for sinking rebates. The 
fillister may be classed as a rebate 
plane. In Fig, 24 is shown one with 
a stop and cutter; the stop is the 
guard on the side, which is secured in 
its place in the side by a screw and 
can be moved up and down by means 
of the slot in the guard ; it regulates 



Fig. 22, 
Plain. 
Plain with cutter. 
Plain with cutter brass side stop. 
Plain with cutter brat a screw atop. 
Plain with cutter brass screw stop I 
Plain with culler and boxwood acre warm* j 
Solid boxed, dovetailed. 

hand fingers and thumb. The fingers 
a being undermcst. It must be held 
perfectly upright. 
Skew fillisters and rebate planeft, or 



"A GREAT SUCCESS" 

Huii' (reds of Car|i«niern jiralsc the hirst IsmL 

HOW TO FRAME A HOUSE, 

or House mini Hoot Framing 

By uwkv . atAomais 

It Is a. practical treatise on the latest and best 
methods of laying out, framing and mixing Um- 
ber houses on the ball loon principle, together 
wtlh a cniuplele nod easily understood system 
of Koof Framing, the Whole makes a handy ami 
easily applied book for oarpe liters, both fore- 
men and lull me v men. 

CIO N I" F.NTH. — Part I 

Chapter I. (Jeiicral description of Balloon 
Frames, framed Mills and their coiirftruetioil. 

Chapter II First Floor Beams or Joist*, Story 
Hectlons. Second Floor Beams. Htudd Ins Fram 
lug of Door and Window Openings, Wall Flatus 
and Bool Timbers. 

Chanter III. I*ylng out and Working Bal- 
loon Frame*. Girders, HI 11a, Fonts and HI lidding 

Chapter IV. I-aylng out First an I Beoond 
Floor Jots la or Beams, Celling Jolata and Wall 
Plates. 

Chapter V, Laying out and Framing the 

Ho..f. 

Chapter VI. Raising. 

PART II -'Hoof-Framing " 

Chapter t. HI mi pie Hoofs. 
Chapter II. Ht)p and Valley lini<f" 
Chapter III. {taotk of Irregular Plan. 
Chapter IV. Pyramidal Raft*, 
i'liepter V. Hexagonal k<»,f«. 
Chapter VI. Conical or Circular Hoofs, cle . etc, 
PABT 111 

How to Frame tin- I im'mra for a It rick Rouse. 
Chapter 1. (Jcncral Description Fimt Htory 
Fireproof Floors, Htuddiiig and \V I l-'ioor 



Chapter II. Hccnud and I'ppt-r Htory Heanm, 
Partitions. Bridging and Angular Ftamlng. 

Chapter III. F I ft- proofing Wood Floor", 
Partitions ami li.inrs 

Chapter IV. Ko ,1*. Bulk he ad" sad Front" 

Chapter V Wood ami Iron Con-trie lion. 

Chapter VI. Heavy Beau, and Qlrden ami 
Hsitdt.g Hame. 

Chapter VII. How to Frame a Log ( '«b1 n 

The work Is Illustrated and explained by over 
*0 large engravings of houses, roofs, etc., and 
bound In cloth. 

PHICK, OSI.V - - tl.00 

"ROOF FRAMING MADE EASY.' 

Thla splendid Im.uk contain* £7 chapters and 
7fi engravings and covers the entire subject. 
Its price la only tl .00. Bound in cloth with gilt 
title. Eiery Carpenter should have one. 

A practical and enally comprehended system 
of laying out and framing roofs adapted to mod- 
ern building comitructton The methods are 
made clear a' id Intelligible with extensive ex- 
planatory text. 

Send Cash or Poet Oillee Ordtrto 
OWEN B. flAQINNIS, 
*10 Weil 138th St., New York City 

tho::e in which the cutter is set on the 
angle are mostly employed for re- 
bating across the grain, though often 
used with It. 

{To be continued.) 



t M"N BtAOf hJOVha 



f bi* ftrlint* ■ 




aati 

lif il- J 




AaJ. 



The above T.abel Is Issued by the Iron Mould- 
era' Union of North America, and can be found 
on all union made itcvea, ranges aod Iron cast- 
ings. It la printed in Mack ink on white paper 
and pastrd on all 
and castings, 

^jgi UN MWOFTHEUNITEDBRa s^..- ;- 




v<£*©*0f The United States. *@/&* 



i3 



Recent Economic Changes, 



XJTO (Hor TllK C'AHCKNTIiK.j 

WE take up the history of 
America, from the time of 
its discovery by Columbus, 
it seems but yesterday when 
this great continent was to all 
appearances a vast and pathless wil- 
derness. In the one hundred and 
twenty odd years the United States 
has traversed as a nation, we have 
outgrown in the production of wealth, 
in the development of art, science and 
literature, monarchies of over one 
thousand years standing. 

How it came about that a nation of 
free born people, intelligent, indus- 
trious and aspirant ; in a land richly 
endowed by nature with inexhausti- 
ble natural resources, possessing at 
this age the bullion, the breadstufl, 
and well nigh the brains of the world, 
find themselves deprived of the land, 
destitute of the means of production, 
and possessing only the right to sell 
their labor, or the power to labor in 
their bodies to those who are in pos- 
session of the land, and the means of 
production and distribution, is a page 
in American history, a chapter in eco- 
nomics on which the polite politician 
keeps as mum as n petrified oyster. 
It would be almost impossible to give 
a complete analysis of this phenom- 
ena in such a limited space. Never 
before in the history of man was so 
great a change brought about in so 
shurt a time. The development may 
be said to divide itself into two pe- 
riods In the first period co-operation, 
or social production for exchange, was 
gradually substituted for individual 
production mainly for use. This 
change was accompanied by a grad- 
ual growth of the purely wage- 
earning class ; also by the expan- 
sion of trade and commerce and 
the replacement of the local market, 
first, by the national market, then 
by the international and world 
wide market. The second period is 
essentially the age of machinery, in 
which, that is to say, steam, elec- 
tricity and improved machinery dom- 
inate the whole industrial system. In 
the first period spoken of the citizen 
became accustomed to look upon him- 
self as a wage worker for life; in 
the se.-ond period he becomes accus- 
tomed to look upon himself not 
only as a wage worker for life, 
but as an appendage to a mon- 
strous machine for the production and 
distribution of wealth. We cannot 
here discuss the question in full as to 
the many changes that have taken 
place during the past fifty years in the 
industrial arena, The object of this 
article is simply to show how the 
carpenter's craft has been affected. 
It is often claimed by our employers, 
and by well meaning men whose sym- 
pathy we court, that our demands are 
unjust ; that wages are higher now 
than they were fifty years ago, that a 
dollar will buy more nowadays than 
two dollars would fifty years ago, etc 
Yet, admitting this is so, we have 
still great reason to complain. 

First, the standard of living is 
higher to day than it was fifty years 
ago. 

*' If few Uirit widIi. their pleasure* are but few ; 
For every want that stimulates the hreaat, 
Become! a aource of pleasure whea redresaed.' 

-Goldtmiih, 



Hence, as Bro. McGuire said in his 
speech, delivered in this city January 
1 7th, "The store windows in all their 
glittering generalities, set the stan- 
dard of living." 

Second, the social conditions sur- 
rounding the daily lives of the car- 
penters have changed. Fifty years 
ago, when an employer hired a car- 
penter, he would, as a general rule, 
send his team after his chest and have 
it taken to the shop. And as long as 
the man worked for him the employer 
felt himself under a moral obligation 
to keep him employed steadily, and 
when a rainy day came he always 
provided for him in the shop or else- 
where But conditions have changed. 
Then it was necessary for a carpenter 
to carry around a chest of tools ; to- 
day the majority of carpenters carry 
their tools around in a "collar box." 
It is a common thing to see, between 
6 and 7 A. M., several of these boxes 
going, not to the shop, as fifty years 
ago, but direct to the job ; not in 
the employer's team, but on the backs 
of the carpenteis ; not to work as a 
permanent employee, but simply to do 
a "job " ; to put a floor on a brick 
block, or nail up some trim that has 
been already fitted together in the 
factory, after which he has to wait 
until the masons have gone up another 
floor, or another lot of trim arrives 
from the factory', a °d after a couple of 
weeks picking at such a job, he packs 
his "collar box" and takes up his 
march again. 

Third, the introduction of im- 
proved machinery into the carpen- 
ter's trade, and the displacement of 
carpenter work on large buildings by 
the application of steel, brick, stone, 
terra cotta and other chemical com- 
pounds, has so simplified what was 
fifty years ago the most difficult part 
of the work, that a man of average 
intelligence, who is willing to work 
hard, and also willing to work for a 
quarter or a half dollar less than the 
carpenter, can most always get a job 
with some one or other of our unscru- 
pulous employers ; such a man will 
hire the "hatchet and saw " man for 
two reasons ; first, he gets him cheap, 
he can work him in on the exterior or 
rough work necessary in large con- 
struction, and second, because he can 
use him later on as a weapon to cut 
down wages. From this point our 
craft has suffered the greatest. 

It actually has become the catch' 
basin for mechanics who have been 
displaced by the introduction of im- 
proved machinery in other industries, 
Fifty years ago, only the unemployed 
in our trade could endanger the jobs 
of those at work. But to-day (virtu- 
ally) the whole army of the unem- 
ployed bear down upon the carpenter's 
trade. And I have known of stove 
makers, machinists, hatters, (who 
were not Union men) weavers and 
farmers taking the place of carpenters, 
so easy has it become to learn what 
is now needed to be known to work 
at the trade. And lastly, our trade 
suffers greatly on account of the lack 
of interest displayed on the part of the 
carpenters themselves, first, as to the 
time honored position our craft has 
held in the past, and second, because 
of the utter indifference to the present. 
In no other craft in the building trade 
is there such a lack of interest, nor is 



this only realized in the craft itself, 
the fruits of our negligence is also 
reflected in the daily lives and homes 
of the craftsmen. Two striking illus- 
trations were seen in this ci'y between 
two crafts in the building trade with- 
in the past few days. One was a 
" Smoker " given by the Brick Masons, 
the other a "Smoker" given by the 
Carpenters. The former entertained 
their guests with musical selections 
on several instruments, songs and 
recitations of an up to da*e character 
were rendered in artistic manner. 
There were poets, orators, elocution- 
ists and singers which, in all, spoke 
well of the intellectual aspirations of 
the men of that craft. 

The latter tried to entertain their 
guests with songs and jig dances five 
hundred years old. Unable to grasp 
the natural impulses of the more re- 
fined age, indifferent »s to the present, 
and without a hope for the future, 
they seek to drown their sorrows by 
stirring up the emotional feelings of 
the dead past and while away the 
evening singing "Jack and Jill went 
up the hill," etc. The former is 
vigilant as to the best interest of his 
trade. He attends the meetings of 
his Union, and through his fidelity to 
the Union has woven a cordon of 
Trade Union principles around his 
craft that protects the individual 
memb jf against the encroachments of 
the botch. He pays a high due to 
keep his Union in good financial 
working order, he demands good pay 
and backs up his demand with an 
organized force of intelligence, and 
wins. And, as a result, is enabled to 
partake of the fruits of the nineteenth 
century. 

The latter is neglectful of the best 
interests of his craft. He never stops 
to consider whether or not a higher 
due would place the craft in a better 
financial condition The majority 
never pay their dues except when 
forced to do so, they seldom attend 
the meetings, they are indifferent as 
to whether the man who works beside 
them carries a Union card in his 
pocket, and as a natural result, and 
to the shame of the carpenters them- 
selves, our much time honored craft 
sinks LJow the level of all others In 
the building trades. Not only socially 
and financially, but morally and In- 
tellectually as well. 

And now in conclusion, and in 
justification of the Trade Union prin- 
ciple, and in reply to all critics, I beg 
leave tospikeonegun,which,although 
charged with an unexplosive com- 
pound, and which, if fired would harm 
no one, yet, while held in abej ance 
with a burning match in the nipple, 
has a tendency to keep away those 
who would otherwise approach the 
business end. 

The question is repeatedly asked : 
" What are you going to do with the 
incompetent man in your Trade 
Unions ? " To which I answer, if he 
is an "incompetent man " then he is 
not a carpenter. Therefore let him 
go back to his own trade from which 
in all probability he has been displaced 
by the introduction of machinery. 
There let him organize his craft, 
and demand of the owners of the 
machine a shorter work day sufficient 
to employ the whole. This is the key 
to the labor problem. 

J. W Biiown. 

Hartford, Conn, 



How to Measure up Woodwork for 
Buildings. 



BY OWEN H MAGINXtS. 



LIST OF STUFF CONTINCKD. 




COVERING 

>UGH boarding or sheath- 
ing, window and door 
frames, water tables, corner 
boards and band courses ; 
panelling, if any. Clap- 
boards or siding and shingling. 

ROOF. 

Shingling, cornices, gutters, ridge 
boards, hip boards, finials. 

PORrilF.S AND PIAZZAS 

Rough timber posts for floor and 
roof, finished posts, cornices and 
shingles for roof, etc. 

Weather boarding, clapboarding 
or siding must be figured for as de- 
scribed in th; last section, that is ty 
calculating the areas of all the square, 
rectangular and triangular surfaces 
to be covered, and then adding them 
together for a whole amount, allowing 
25 per cent, extra for overlap and bad 
ends. 

Shingles are calculated according 
to the weather or length of surface 
exposed. Nine will cover one square 
foot if the weather is 4 inches ; eight 
if it is 4*4 inches, and seven if it 
is 5 Inches. As the bunches of 
shingles average 250 to a bunch 
it is a simple matter to figure up 
the entire roof surface in square 
feet and divide by the number of 
shingles to the weather which will 
give the entire quantity required 

Great care and accuracy is required 
in calculating all details, so in closing 
these articles I would recommend 
constant checking so that none may 
be omitted or forgotten. 

I ahor News from Old Albion. 




ROSPERITY in the build- 
ing trades in and around 
Manchester is so great that 
in some districts they are 
agitating for a further ad- 
vance in wages. 

The Amalgamated Society of Car- 
penters and Joiners has decided to 
ballot whether they are in favor of 
paying a levy of not more than one 
shilling per week (twe;ity-four cents) 
for the purpose of establishing a build- 
ing corporation and joinery works on 
the co-operative system, the Executive 
Council to find a suitable locality, 
the works to be managed by a small 
committee to report quarterly to the 
Council, The capital required will 
be raised by this levy, so that the 
geneml fund of the Society will not 
be affected. 

Of the wisdom of this step I have 
some doubts, as the competitive spirit 
in the building trades is so very keen. 
It will, however, provide an opening 
for employing the members when out 
of work, who would otherwise be 
receiving out of-work benefit, and 
thus save the funds of the Society in 
that way. 

As to the shipyards on the Clyde, 
the state of trade is unprecedented, 
and the joiners, carpenters, pattern- 
makers and woodworkers, or the 
"white squad," as they are called to 
distinguish them from the "black 
squad " of ironworkers, are exceed- 
ingly busy. Wages are going up and 
{Continued on next page 1 



14 



THE CARPENTER. 



there is a great demand for men, and 
the supply is small. The white sijuad 
is getting about nine shillings per 
week of fifty-four hours, or one and a 
half hours more than in the Bolton 
district. The black squad is said to 
be getting anywhere from twelve to 
thirty- five dollars per week. There 
is one thing though that is most re 
markable. and that is, under the most 
favorable conditions of trade, both at 
hoir.w and abroad, the carpenter is 
always in the rear of the other trades 
in wages. 

The monthly report of the 15 oiler 
Makers and Steel Shipbuilders Asso- 
ciation is a flowing account of the con- 
dition of trade for some time past, But 
the Executive seems to consider there 
is a rather <jneer aspect in the number 
of members on the funds having 
incrersed by 485 in one month, and 
now the current report shows a 
further increase of 141, After stat- 
ing thi.>, it proetw&r tu point out that 
any one of the principal shipbuilding 
districts could give employment to 
almost all who are on donation benefit, 
and it advises its branches to cease 
paying out-of-work benefit, and send 
the men to work. Such conduct is 
not very commendable on the part of 
the men, and if persisted in they 
will "keep cutting the wool off 
the sheep that has given the golden 
fleece." 

Mr. G. Ritson, an official of the 
"Free Labor Association," an anti- 
Trade Union body, states that the 
Manchester branch is making rapid 
progress both in numbers and intel- 
ligence, conveying the idea that the 
latter quality is much needed among 
them, a truism so apparent that there 
is not room for the least doubt. This 
"Free Labor Association" is mani- 
festly intended to inj ure Trades Union- 
ism. It has extended its operations, I 
understand, even to Fall River, Mass. 
The very name of this association is 
anomalous ; the members being regis- 
tered and governed by officials con- 
stitute it an organized body, and it is 
no more free than other organizations. 

Its avowed object is to co operate 
with capital in weakening and destroy- 
ing the results that have come through 
Trade Unions and are enjoyed by the 
toiling millions. It seeks to put labor 
in a more abject and subordinate con- 
dition, and place it in the power of 
capital. There is this consoling 
thought, however, they are starting 
late in the race. They are handicapped, 
for wherever men unite together to 
confer mutual benefits, to prevent or 
redress wrongB, and promote each 
others' happiness, the doctrines of 
this Free Labor Association will not 
be accepted. 

There is, however, one thing about 
its inception that cannot be passed 
over lightly and that is, it Is hostile 
to Trade Union principles and we can- 
not regard it with either complacency 
or kindness ; it is bound to en-ender 
mental caloric, and ebullition of feel- 
ing, by reason of its being an Inno- 
vation on the nrmly established cus- 
toms of this country. We owe more 
to Trades Unions for what they have 
done for the wage-earner than we are 
disposed to pay to any other move- 
ment, and it concerns us very mater- 
ially to maintain their present high 
standard of perfection, and by hercu- 




lean efiorts sustain their vigor. It is 
true, and "pity 'tis, 'tis true" that 
in all reforms effected by concerted 
action the undeserving share in them. 
Were it otherwise, probably, it would 
in some measure Influence many to 
identify themselves with some com- 
bination for their own welfare, tbey 
wonld realize the necessity of it, they 
would see the wisdom of it, and un- 
derstand the justice of it. 

Let us just look at the peculiar 
position in which "Jfree labor" places 
itself, it has assumed an attitude of 
resistance to Union labor on the one 
hand, and it has entered into an un- 
holy alliance with capital on the other, 
virtually to assist capital when the 
opportune moment arrives in its ne- 
farious designs on united labor, and 
as a consequence likewise on itself. 
Could folly any further go? It is 
hardly possible. It is cherishing a 
fatal error if it expects to receive bet- 
ter treatment at the hands of capital. 
To make this plainer let us just sup- 
pose a case, A large employer of labor 
has a strong force of free labor men 
employed by him, as well as members 
of Trades Unions, but these former 
are in a minority. Notice is given of 
a reduction in wages, or some alter- 
ation in working hours or rules, 
inimical to the men 's interests. In- 
structions are given to the unionists 
to resist to the utmost, such a de- 
mand being incompatible with Union 
aims. The free labor men either have 
to tamely submit, or act in conjunction 
with the unionists. If they bow and 
cringe to the selfish demands of the 
boss, they show a cowardly spirit, and, 
if, on the other hand, they act with 
the unionists, they stultify themselves 
because their object is to promote the 
bosses' interests, not to injure or ob- 
struct them. 

Iustitia, 

Harwich, Lane, Eng. 



An Improved and Patented Universal 
Wood -Worker. 



Tliree adjustable heatings 10 Mandrel— Slotted 
steel heart Msndreli with bearing adjust- 
ahle horizon tally across face of talit>-*- 
Tables on Incline* Improved for perfect 
alignment -Table* adjustable independent- 
ly, horizontally, vertically or to the circle of 
the head ; also a''juatable together, verti- 
cally, or to the circle of the heart, or drawn 
hack to give free accent to mandrel. 
This newly improved No. 1 I ni versa! Wood- 
Worker built and designed by the J'gan Com- 
pany IC.i to l^B Weal Front street, Cincinnati. 
Ohio, ha* advantages and convenience! pos- 
sessed by no other wood wo-ker Tor ila match- 
less aimpl icity and easy adjustment, it superioi 
to any other in the market. The immense vari- 
ety of work It will do, and dltierent ways it can 
be adapted to various kinds of work, ha* earned 
for it the title of '■ Universal," or " Variety Wood. 
Worl tr." We enumerate a few of the -liferent 
kinds of work that can be done on it to advan- 
tage, in fact the variety of work is limited tnly 
by the ingenuity or the operator. It will make 
glue joints; plane "out of wind;" chamfer; 
cross-gain; groove; cut straight; circular or 
elliptical molding*; tongue and groove; coiner ; 
plane taper; raise panel*; miter; rabbet; will 
rabbet and joint window blinds al one opera- 
tion , make serpentine and wave molding , lable 
joints ; fluting and beading on corn era or Tare of 
baluster* ; plowing . rip and cross-cut sawing ; 
h r I ; routing, etc., etc. 

The rolumn is ci>rert out and cast In >>ne piece, 
anrt very heavily braced, widening very much 
at the baae, making a very solid beating for the 
machine to stand on, preventing all possible 
vihration of ihe mandrel and head* when run- 
ning at the very highest speed, dor particular 
poiut in which this machine excels all other* ia 
the patent connected and movable bearing*, 
whji h are adjustable laterally across the 
machine in square {ribbed slide*, by the small 
hand wheel in front. Tims, when the operator 
ha* hi* fence set tor doing work, he can adjust 
the head with the greatest rapidity to the exact 
line wanted- a point which Is much appreciated 
by all classes of wood- worker*. 

The spindle ha* an outside bearing which can 
be instantly removed by loosening one hand- 
bolt, hi vi 1 1 14 free access to the head. It is ol the 
best steel, 1 7 Iti" in diameter, runs tfl three self- 
oiling bearing*, lined with the best material and 
with the driving pulleys between bearingt. Alt 
cutler heads used are made of the very heat 
material, adapted to the highest apeed. The 
convenience of all adjuntment* on this Wood- 
worker is h point of superiority over any other, 
and a point that we feel, when taken into con- 
slderntlon In connection with the strictly first, 
class material, and high grade of workmanship, 
wtli commend this machine as superior to any 



Holh tables may be adjusted vertically, hori- 
zontally, and to Die circle of th>- hrnd independ- 
ently, or may be di.iwn clear ba< k from the 
cutter head, giving iter- arcf-k tf> the mandrel 
to put on any cutlers, head*, or sawn, and tn tj 
be moved back again without disarranging ibe 
tables. Holh may be raised ami lowered 10. 
gether. following the Hide of Ihr heart, by tlie 
hand wheel nt the working etui of the machine 
or both tallies mav be raised and lowefad 10 
gether vertically b, the large h mil wheel at t lie 
front. Hoth of ihi rtrtjiisment* will be foi.nd 
verv convenient a- the relative positions of Hie 
table* are not change, m,d the artjustme t i< 
accomplished in either instance by menu- ot 
a single hand wheel. The convenience of th-^f 
adjustments will tie very much appreciated in 
gaining, rabbeting sawing, etc. There are four 
Incline* to each tanle, one at each corner, 
arranged so that all wear mav be taken up and 
the tables always kept in perfect alignment, not 
withstanding any wear that may lake place. 

The gaining frame Is of very superior con- 
st ruction , something new anrt novel. The j an 
eling frame, **w tmarrts, throat iron* for ten, ft- 
ing, elc , oi cutter heads compleu- fur different 
kind* of work , can all be furnished with Ihl 
muchine when requited. 

1'or pinel raising, they furnish two panel 
hearts, w th a special fence. Iloth sides of any 
door panel, of any shape, can be raised al the 
same time 

The patent adjustali e bevel ience can he *el 
to any angle desired by loosening one clamp 
boll, and ha* a Irec movement scros* the lable 
for the different kind* of work to be done. The 
face of this fence i* planed pet fee ly Hue, and 
Is very accurate. 

The boring side ran be used for all kinds of 
boring or muting. The table in raised mil 
lowered Independently by the i ranks shown is 
cut A fence fur angle boring i* fitted on ihl 
table with stops for spacing the holes and rout 

let 

This woodworker was awarded a medal it 
the Cincinnati Industrial Imposition, over srv 
eral competitor*, October 8, Isxi! , October 
1XSS; also Cincinnati centennial Kxpuaili * 
JHNN; World'H J'nlr, Chicago, 1*):;: Antwerp, 
Belgium, 180:1; and Santiago. Chile, mil. lor on 
venience of adjuntment and -jilgluabty of n ir 
atruction and the reliable and thorough w .is* 
man ship displayed throughout. 

A counter*hait with improved floor liangetsii 
furnlahed when needed, nod the T. ft L, putlevt 
are II)" x T,%". 

The Kgau Company, m to Weil pronl 
street, Cincinnati, Ohio, have had a special corp 
of expert mechinlca anrt draughtsmen *i 
work for the pa*t year, designing and perfect- 
ing new and improved wood working machine', 
and this iaone of those that they have just 
brought out, and which aurpansen anything ever 
before plated on the market ol its kind. 

This company make a full and complete line 
of high gratle machines for manufacturing 1 " " 
clea of every description, out of wood, and tnry 
can furnish atngle machine* or complete ouiuli 
for any kind of plant with their make oi 
machinery, and ihey will be pleased to give pot 
full information an i quote you special price* on 
this or auy other improved wood-workuif 



xexWHsWiasHaMtt 



THE CARPENTER 



15 



%a§ btt ftntrrifanifdjrn fflftoerff*afte» 
JflftncjitruB. 




Jt ben SBer. Staaten ftnb runb erne 
Minion Sttbeiter In ©etuerlfdjafteu 
»;teiniflt. fciereon finb jirfa 80 
^ro'. in bem ©efammttierbanbe 
ber Anietican Federation of 
I .abor, 10 $roj, in ben Sierbanben 
bet (?ifeitbabnana.efleLUen, la SSruj. ftnb in 
ben l Ufa leu Uauarbeiterotgan/attonen, unb 
20 ^ji'oj. in anberen, untet fid) oereinigten 
Drgantfationen, bie jum D^il Wittern 
bet Stbeit (Kni»hts of Labor) angebBren. 

Dtefe ^ahkrt ftnb ^uiummetiaetraaen aus 
ben Wetidjtrn bet SJeli&rben fiit KtbeUin 
ftattftif unb ben 58eric(|t«n bet oerfdjiebenen 
iianbed* unb Ortdgeroerlfdjaften unb Mrbeu 
tet 'Setbonbe- 

Wad) bet tetjten 33 o ltd jab, tun g finb H,0QOf 
tWi ^erfonen in ben fflet. ©taaten, roeldje in 
@rrDerbeoerb,altmffen fte&en fcietoon finb 
4 OOU.000 roeiblidje $erfone«, 7,000,000 
Sanbatbriter, gelernte fcanbroerter San!< 
unb ©onblunflifl«ftulfen,3.000,(jf)() attbeiter, 
roeldje fan Citwtxbt erlernt haben, unb 
2,000 <KH> Dienftboten unb ^ttfonen in a&n* 
lidjen Stettungen, roeldje fid) )u flfrajtlfdjaft' 
lidjer Dtganifation ntdjt eignen. Son ben 
ubrigen 5,000,000 finb rjieHeidjt 50,000 Kt> 
beitgeber, unb roenigfteni 2/100,000 leben in 
£anbftat>ten unb in ben buwibeoblferien 
Diftriften bed fiiblidjen unb raefltic&en &c 
dieted, aufterEjalb bet fflittelpunlie bet ge< 
roerilidjen Setriebe, bets SJeigbautd unb 
onbetet 3nbuftrte(Mebiete, roeldje bad Jelb 
tut tube item etbanbe barbieten. £>iernad) 
oerbletben ungefaQr 2^00,000 Wll^f bie ©e< 
nietbe unb bie ©ebiete umfafTen, in toeldjen 
bie ©eroerffdjaUtn i&re X&iitigieit emfalten. 

^n mandjen ©emeiben ift bie C rgamtation 
eollftdnbig ooUgogen, in toenigen naljtiu 
oollftdnbig, unb in einem Wemerbe nadj bem 
anberen brginnen bie ©erotrtfdj often einen 
entfdjeibenben Gtnt'lufj ju geroinnen. Sin 
arofeer Ib/il bet Wtdjtorgamiirten ift ben 
^lerbinbunaen moEjlgeneigt unb getjt bit gu 
einem geroiffen itfrabe nut itjnen, unb aufjer* 
bent ftnb bie 9jortE)ei[e bet Serbinbungen 
betattig, baft bie Million bet Draamftrten, 
mjidje fie \\<t) gu einem gemeinfamen ,-Jrotrte 
oereinigt, tbte gorherungen erjanngen fann, 
obgleid) bie iReljTbeit ber Srbeiter md)( 
orgamfirl ift. 

Die S(rt unb ffleife bet Oetbinbung in ben 
rjerfdjiebenen (tkioerben ridjtet fid) na 4 ben 
Oeibdltniffen, rotrb abet in bet §auotfad)e 
oon einem (Irunbiafce geleitet. Sid eine «rt 
bet SSerbinbung net)ine man g. 39. biejenigen 
bed %uo>btudetaft»etbtt. 3« biefem Sanbt 
beftitben ft<$ meb,r aid :J00 Strbanbe Don 
Ceftetn unb Roctettoren, in jebet @tabt ein 
Sctbanb bed 'Heroetbtt. 2)iefe finb gu einem 
nalionalen Setbanbe, mit bem $auptfl|e in 
^nbianapoli*, oeteintgt. Btatft bielem 9Jltt- 
tetpunfte (enben bie setf^iebenen Crtftoen 
bdnoe ibre 3)eiio)tc unb bann tauj4en fie 
tb^re Vtbeitettatten gegenlcittg au«, roobuio> 
etn Sltbeiter, roeltb>t in einet 6tabt »ob,nt, 
fl<$ (einen ftametaben in einet anbeten an. 
f$liefeen fann. 

Die SRttaltebetgaf)! biefet O'tloetbanbe ift 
|ef)t Dttfgiebcn. (Sintae t^aben 10 i'hiahe. 
bet, einigt loo, einige nentae 50U bis 1,000 
unb bet SBerbanb in 91en> V)otf b,at tlber 5,<KW 
IHUalteber. 

HQe Xageflgeitunaen Stem 9)orM, mit Slus- 
nab,me einet, ae^oren gum Setbanbe, ebem 
falle aUe gtbfteten IBudibtudeteien unb bie 
a>tud!eteien fiit ®e(cb,aftflfotmulate. Die 
beften Dtudet gef/oren gu bem iBetbanbt. 
fltbeiter, iu;Idje nidjt gum Serbanbe ae^bten, 
metben in bem @en>erbe nirtjt aid couiuett^ig 
anaefet/en, auflaenommen roenn fie etn Mtbeitt 
geber gegen ifjr* Slitaibeitet gebraud)t, urn 
gu oetfu^en, ben feftgefteaten fio^faft t/et< 
untetgubtatfen. 

2>it 3)ittgliebet fttmmen bei ni^tigen f}ta< 
gen in ben uetf4iebentn3&«t!ftattDerbdnben, 
aenannt Jtapellen, ab, n>obui(f> ubetctlte 
aBa6nftb,men oetfjinbett toetben, bie im ®e< 
genfate gu bem Urtfceite unb bet Jleigung 
ber gtogen aHtbtb,eit bet Setbanb«mitg(tebct 
3n fllet(4et SQSeife toitb bei bem 



3nternationaIen Itjpogtapbifcf/en Berbanbe 
bie Sengietftattung unb bie Muf fteliuna son 
^otbetungen get^anbblabt, ioDbnrcb fdmmU 
liifje iRitgliebet bie X^dtigfeit beS National' 
cetbanbeS Tonttolliren unb toio>tige 5 r 0(l"> 
unb 6eabfi(§ttgte Siajregeln, rottoje gu?tft 
alien DctSaerbdnben gur 33eipre$ung »orge« 
lent merben, entto^eib'n. Dtefe 9Cct bet Set< 
binbung, wit fteberXi;pojtap^ifd}e Setbanb 
bat, biente aid Sorbtlb bem SofomotiD* 
fubrer< unb £o!omotiDf|etgeioetbanbe unb 
eigentltib; aucb, ber ffleficgabl «Het National" 
SJerbdnbe. 

Die American Federation of Labor ift 
eine S3etbinbung, m$t eine %erf$melMing 
bet meiften National-® em "fi^aften, fr.ro ob,! 
bie gtBfMfi rote ber Drtdo.'tbanbe. @ie bait 
aUe altgemeine 3 u f« mr «f"tunH "on 3<bge» 
oroneten einmal tm Jafjre ab. »uf biefet 
3ufammentunft merben bie einguf^Iagenben 
IBege unb bie Hi bei t bet Setbanbed fiit bad 
lommenbe 3a^t befo^Ioffen, unb fie btent a(« 
Kittel, bie SSemtt&ungen »ttet in Uebetein< 
ftimmung gu btingen. 

Die meiften ®en>ettf$aften b;aben Unieti 
ftii(ungd(affen unb bebeutenbe Summen 
fl*b,en bei iljnen fiir btefen 3medD3n $ianb gu 
fcanb. Die ^a^Iungen fiit Begidbniffe bed 
3ttlernattona(en 7npogtapb,ifd)en Sctbanb'd 
betragen jafjthtb <i4 OOO, unb tneijr mie 
idijrltd) 520,000 merben fiit Untetl)altung 
ber 31u[b,bruc!a S)eniut gu Colombo Sptingtl 
fiit atte, atbeitdunfa^tge Dtucf er autgegeben. 
Dei X^pogtap^il^e ^erbanb in 9iero -)ort 
vetaudgabte in ben lefeten oiet 3at)ien bur^' 
f(b.nittlt* llfeit* |S5,000 fttt unbef(b,afttgte 
J£(ii> ^otfet Sudjbtutfet unb 59,000 jdbrIio> 
fiit Untetftufeungen bei XobeeiaKen. «ufeer< 
beat ftnb bie alten unb fcanfen Ritgliebet oon 
bet j&Juna »on Beittagen unb ®ebub,rcn 
befteit unb f reie SJetten metben fiit bie 3Hit» 
gliebet in ben oerf$iebenen ©ofpitdUtn 
untet fatten. 

Sua) bie JtapeHen ijaben Unterftii^unt - . 
Ian en 'i id) ntebriget @4a(ungvetau<jaabt 
bet 9lem JUrfer Tqpograp^if^c Setbanb 
iiber 550,000 jS&rtio) aUein fttt oetf^ieben. 
artijfte Unietftii|aagen unb Seitrdge Die 
ortltdje unb internationale ®efammtaudgabe 
fur rooijltijdtiAe 3a>ecte betragt bei ben $er> 
einigungen ber Xgpogtapb,fn jd^tli^ |300,i 
001) bid 5'150,<i00. 

Dei international* S8et6anb bet3igattem 
ma^er gerodb,rt flrantenunterftiifung son 
mo4enttio> $5 Untetftii(ung, bei Qegtdb> 
niffen son |80 bid ?500, unb tm 3ab,te 1893, 
gut 3eit bed allgtmeinen ®ef4dftdnieber» 
btanged, oetaiiiiabte bet SBerbanb £89,000 
gut Untetftu(ung Ktbeiidlofet. Die (He* 
fammtfumme fiir Datleben, ©eitrdge, 39e> 
gtdbniffe unb fiit UntetP(ung Strbtitdlofer 
unb Rranlet betragt meftt rote £250,000 
labrlia). 

Die Sofomotiofflb^ter ga^Iten raab^tenb bet 
te|ten fiinfgeEfn 3a[»ren buttbf^natlitb, jdbr- 
U4 #175,00* J fur Untetftitbung bei Zobed< 
fdOc, unb bie fcetger #150,000 id&rlioj. 

Diefe vict Betbdnbe, roeld)e roa^rfdjemlidj 
120,000 SJitglieber gdblen, gtben idyrtid, 
ben Setrag son #l,O0U,ODO ben gkbiliftigen. 
Dei ben mitteUoferen Ulerbanben ift bet Ve< 
ttag unaeroifj, abet bet 8ciiO)t bet Setjbrbe 
fttt Krbettetftatiftit bed Staated :Ktm *)ott 
fttt IH»4 getgt, bafi bie setf^iebenen Htx. 
dbnbe bed Ctaatel in biefem 3abre 5^H."00 
fttt gegenfeitige Unterftufcung audgaben. 
nai) biefem eafcc rotttben bte jdb.rlid) in 
biefet 9Deife son ber Million oraani, rte 
i/Ubeiter aulgegebenen SSetrdge gnifr^en 
#:i,000,Otl() bid 54,000,000 au^inaojen. 

Den @ero*rr|$aften ift eo gu banfcn bag 
bit Sttbrbe fttt ftrbeitetftattfti! unb bit fUt 
^abriftnlpeftottn, fomie audj bie @4iebtge< 
rtcdte geftfjaffen mutben. Vie I ift son iQnen 
far bit Strbeffetung son SBertftatten unb 
gur UnterbrUdung bet Jtinbetarbeit get^an. 
Die ®efe|e gum Sdjufce bet Stbeitet unb bie 
f an 1 tare n ttnrigtungtn bet sBetnebe finb in 
ben Begirfen meit btffer in tselo)en bie Wn 
better organtflrt finb, alt in benen roo ed an 
Organifation mangeit. 

Dad Ka)tftunbengeftt fttr bie bet Hegier* 
ung bef^ttfttgtc V«tfonen, u. «. fttt bie 
SJetefttdger, bad @efe« ttber mbdjentlidje 



Sobngab^Iung, bie Xbfdjaffung ber (Hefang> 
nifjarbeit afd JTonfurreng ber freien 9lrbeit, 
bet geregelte Ktbeitdtag unb bet b^atbe 
ftetetiag am Sonnabenb, ftnb in ber erfien 
Stnie ber Zb,dtigteit ber @emerffdjaften gu 
oerban!en. 

Die -}iect> flixltx 33e^btbe fiit XiBeitet* 
flattftif (ante in ben Setidjten fttt bie ^atjre 
J8B5 bid lH'.t'.i, bafj rodfjtenb btefer 3"* ffl<&,r 
mi; 17,000 Sludftdnbe, betrtffenb 2t.5«7 
8etriebe, on Srfolg roaren, 5.1W roaren 
obne (Srfolg unb 1.860 roiren ifteilroeife er< 
fotgreidj, ober ed fanb eine SSetftaabigung 
ftatt. 

Die OTationaLHtbeitetbebotbe fttfjtte 
©tattflif fiber bte Bngaftl berHrbeiter roeidje 
con 1881 bid einfd)Iief}U4 l»i I an Hudfidn* 
ben betb,eitigt roaren, unb ftellte bie $at)l oon 
3,700,000 fefl. Son biefen fatten bei ben 
«udftanben oon 1H81 bid 1887 47 $roj. unb 
oon !K8h bid 18!»1 41 ?jiOg. rotten gtfolg. 

aJtelebet Hudftdnbe roaren ntdjt organtfitt. 
XJiirben nut bie organtftrten beretbnet roer* 
ben, fo bttrfte ftdj ergeben, bafj ca. 75 $«g. 
biefer Hudftdnbe etfofgteidj roaten. 

Die tiettdjte ft«Qen feft, taafj bie ; -;ab,t ber 
Kudftdnbe ftdj oerringert. €ie sermisbert 
lid) mit ber toadjfenben ©l,ufe ber (Seroetr< 
fd^aften. Sudgenommen biefe b,aben in ben 
3af>ren ifjtes ^eftebend babin geroirlt, ba| 
bie £bb,ne ber SttUion organtfuter Slrbeitet 
um |2 modjenttid) gtmidifen ftnb, fo fatten 
bamit biefe SUbeiter fid) jdbtlid) #1,000,OGO 
nti|t oon bem ®efammtettrage ber Srbeit 
gefidjert.— American Feder;itioni-.t- 

— Uebet bad Medjt, gu flreifen, Idfjt 
ftd) ein gut ftaatderb,altenber Wann, Dr. 
SoQnett, in Dtedben, roie folgt aud : „9Ran 
fann geroifj bamit eirsjtftanben fein, bag 
jebe Studfdjreitung ib,ten firengen Slidjtet 
finbet. »bet auf ©ttetfoetgeben angeroenbet, 
roitb man nidjt oergeffen bttrfen, baft otelen 
Urbeiterrt, f of etn Tie einen audfommltdjen 
i.'o[jn etbalten rooDen, 1b,atfdd)lidj oft ntdjtg 
roeiter ubrig Metbt, aid ju ftreifen, fobalb 
ifjncn som Xrbettgeber eine SoCjner^bb.ung 
regelmdfeig sertseigert roirb. 3n 3eiten 
gtinuiger ®e<d)dfldEage fudjt jeber Unter< 
netjmer fttr feine SQaare einen t;db,eren $teid 
gu etbatten j in 3*iten t biuret gemorbener 
£ebendunterb,allurig roenben ftd) urn bie (?r» 
fjbbung ib^red (linfomm-nd felbft Starrer unb 
Secret unb fianbtage unb fflemeinben, ben 
Seamten roo^Imoaen ©etjalldgulagen be* 
roittigt. SRan latin ed belter aud) bem Sr. 
better nidjt srtargen, roenn er bet bem 
©tetgen ber SRtetbpreife unb Sleifdjpceife 
eine Setbeffetung jeined Sotjned gu erteidjen 
fud)t. Suit ctinnetn an ben £ treit bet Jton. 
fefttordarbeilerinnen sor meb,reren 3abrett, 
beffen Betedjtigung bon einflufereidjen 9«dn» 
nern aller Sarteitn anerfannt unb and) oon 
bet «eid)dregierung im roeftnttid)en ntd)t be* 
ftritten murbe. Der beutfdje Htbeiter mu% 
IRarl in benHncrinn bfiaUtn. roenn feine 
ftanb einfi mit flraft unb Htuib bad 3Jaler< 
lanb ld)irmen foO." 



Constitution for Building Trades 
Council. 



HKTilt. 




Tills Im » facsimile ot 
the bM<li[u worn by all 
mtmlnri of ihe RfUil 
t'li'rk«' N»tloiiftl Pr< ( tpct- 

tVU A»Hllcllltl()lt Of til* 

f 1, It.-. I KUIr> He« (hut 
nil nul.'-iiu-ii And plerkn 
wcjir tli i h I !*.!(((■, mill you 
nmy im aura thoy « r « 



1.1- - ^ 

UNION-MA! 




DMHtN PK1NTEB8 LABEL. 

Thin Label ia 
luued under 
kaiuhorlty ol the 
International 
Typographical 

Onion and ot the German Typographta. The 




AKTICLSI. 

Sirnoirl. Thin orftanlKfttlon «ha,ll be known 
as the AmalgtunHted Council of the Bui Id Ink 
Trade*. 

Sue. 2. Thin council shall he composed of dele- 
tftiU-H duly chOHcii from allaoclcth-H 111 the I ml Id- 
Ink trades, who pha-11, before being admitted , 
priMluvti crtMli'tillulH sIk nr. I hy t lu> (>reflidt-Nl HTid 
record Inft secretary of their society, and shall 
have the seal of their union attached. 

Sec. 8. In ease of a secret society, the se*l of 
the lodge attached shall be a sufficient guarantee 
of their genuineness 

8«c, 4, The officers of this society xhall consist 
of a chairman, vit-e-chalrman and recording sec- 
retary, corresponding secretary, financial secre- 
tary, treasurer aud aergeant-st-nrms. 

tome. •. The chairman and vice-chairman shall 
be elected at each meeting, "rid shall he nomi- 
nated from delegates or different societlen, nor 
shall any ehai.-man sit In judRraent on any case 
affecting the union he belongs to. 

>«'■ 6. The recording secretary, corresponding 
secretary, fl n an cis I secretary, treasurer and ser- 
geant- a t-arms ahull lie elected rguarterly ; the re- 
secretary shall receive such salary » 



ABTH I E It. 

fl«<Tto!» t, The executive functions of this 
council shall be veated in the offlcem and dele- 
gates while In aesslnn, and in such couimttleea 
Ha this c-jiincll may find necessary to conduct its 
business under this constitution. 

Hm\ 1. The objects of this council s!iall be to 
centralise the uulied effurts and experience of 
the various societies engaged in l he erection and 
alteration of buildings, jind that they may fori.) 
one common council and with common \iteres' 
to prevent thai which may be injurious, and 
properly perfect and carry iutoellect that which 
they may deem advantageous to themselves, and 
for the common good of all. 

ft EC 3. All trade and labor societies re pre- 
sented in this council, when desirous of matting 
a demand for either an advance of wages or an 
abridgement In the hours of labor, shall, 
through their delegates, report the mine, to this 
council prior to the demand being made, when, 
if concurred In hy a two-thirds vole of all the 
societies present, lit any stated meeting, the 
action shall be binding. This section shall not 
prevent »• v society from, acting on Us own re- 



ARTICLE III. 

RlCTiOIt I. No trade shall be entitled to more 
tlinn three voles on any uuestton that directly 
affects the material interests of any trade society. 

Hkc. X All trades or societies represented shall 
be entitled to three delegates. 

8wc. 8. Any eoctely having three or mora 
brancbea shall be entitled to one delegate for 
ea.'h branch. 

Sectioh 1. Any trade or society represented 
In this council that may desire material aid, 
shall state their ease to this council, aud, if ap- 
proved by the delegates, shall tiring the matter 
before their respective organisations for Imme- 
diate action. 

ABTIt LE V. 

Section J. It shall lie the special duty of this 
council to use the united strength of all the 
societies repiccntt-d therein, to compel all non- 
union men and "scabs" to conform to. and 
ohay the laws of. the society that they should 
properly bcloug to. 

Sec. 2. It shall lie ttie duly of any trade or 
labor aoclety to use every lawful means to In- 
auce all non-union men or scabs to become 
members of I heir respective unions, aud any 
trade society failing in their just cttortn, aball 
bring the matter before this council through 
their delegates, with all the facts In the cose, 
with the names of the nun If possible, where 
employed, and the name of the employer, the 
same to bn presente* In writing, with the signa- 
ture of the president of the society atiected, 
when tills council s'lall lake immediate action In 
the matter, and If deemed advisable, thin council 
may, by a. two-thirdn vole of the delegates then 
present, forming a ijuorum, order a withdrawal 
of any or all trades or societies wr.o may lie on 
any hutUlliig where said non-union men or 
scabs mar be employed. This order shall tm 
gUTted lido effect through the Jigency of Ut| 



ted in thtl 



Sei-iion 1. 
council shall | 
month. 



Alt 



of two 

AKTIrLH Vtl. 



Hi (Tins I. On demand of a union represented, 
a general strike shall lie ordered to reinstate a 
member or member* who have struck and are 
refused employment on the job that was struck. 
Hue Any Business Agent or Agents nf any 
socluty orderiug A strike without ttio oouaeul 
of this council, the trade he r. presents shall 
be held responsible f- r the wages of the men on 
strike. This shall nut prevent utt Agent from 
ordering a strike of the members of the society 
!>u represents lo adjust tin own Internal affairs 
without the assistance of lids council. 

Sec. 3. Members of a union seceding from a 
patent organ t sail on and forming a aep 
1 aha! I be excluded from this council. 
.4. All branches of a union aball 

1 and Uie same hours of labor. 



VIII. 

flier IOW 1. When the members of two union* 
represented In this eumn.il work at the same 
trade. It shall be unlawful for one lo lake the 
place of the other when on strike. 



is used on all newspaper aud book work. 
Jt always bear* the name and location of where 
tbe prlnUug < 



IX. 

HbwtioM I. No society or branch of a society 
shall bo allowed l» strike more than one em- 
ployer at a time, unlets ihera are two or mora 
employers on the same Job. 

ARTICLE X. 

Hbtim 1 Two-thirds of all the trade repre- 
sented In this council shall form a quorum. 

SB< . t. 1 1 shall take two weeka' itotloe of 
ttoii and twO'thtrds majority to 
any artloii) of this constitution. 



16 



^HE CARPENTER. 




AgoHs for The Caki'i ntkr. 



n 

"- 



ALABAMA. 

Mohile— D. Prench. 0U1 Charleston st. 

(COL) W. G. Lewis, Til St. Louis st. 

ARKANSAS. 



EM Fayetti-villi -M. F. Cunningham 
hU Ft. Smith -II G. Rird 

CALIFORNIA. 

li+l . Ai.amkm- C. H Thrane, W7> Johnson awe. 
332. Los Am. elks— S Gray. Box 221. 
38. Oakland— ChM J. Jacobs. I TUT drove st. 
';>. Riverside -Chas. Iianulti.ni, Vine slid 
Sm li rts, 

S\n HftAitctKo -Secretary of Dial Council, 
win j. K\d i. aaosd st. 

-V. N. L. Wan lell, llSf's Mission st.. Sta. B. 

It.) ( Latin) L, Musarie. 1 1 1 „ Erie it 

KM. |Ger.) Win. III. Ellsworth st 

1st Guv L«thn>ii P15H Market at. 

3in iim w. i wiicox. fictS W fntlan at, 

3fi San Rahel— J. J. Sheils, Bo\ U'l 

CANADA. 

II Dkan rnVKH-l. W. Tav lor. 158 Terrace Hill. 
83. Halifax, N. S.-Geo. Browne. 12 Willow st. 
iv Hamilton— W. J. Frit! . '.'-"> Nelson at. 
IIM MuMKMi.-lHr.) K. Frechette, 231 Miti- 
gulnet. 

:iTti. " Allan Ramsay. 1.T yuesnel st 
255. R it 1'oH tai;k, Ont. jas T. Mar/etti. 

38 sr. l a in ukim s — James Hindsoti, Henrv si. 

ST. T.-miNTit-D. D McNeill. 2Ss Hamburg ave. 
(JIT, Vasoiivkr, B. C.-AHre,i B Collin, 1213 
Richard st, 

343. Wis Nil-no, M an — R. Bell, 78 Schultz at, 
COLORADO. 

201 Hoilder— E. Llndborg. 
>i5. Colo, springs- Fran s Sawyer. Flit Hotel. 
CalRU CunMtoC, of D C, P.N. Mcl'hce, 
Box 478. 

,47 Cripple CrkKK— Will. Smith, atif E Myers 
55 Denver -I. B. Reeder, 1332 Cnliforuiit St. 
214 El DOB A— J. H. Rebm. 
178 Independence— T, W. Reid. Macon. p. O 
R jx ft, 



234 
5M" 



OtTRAV -John Kirbv 
Victor— C. E. Palmer, Box 381. 

CONNECTICUT. 



115. 

1ST, 
43 

ti7 
7!) 
133 
1*7. 
74*. 
210 
•JIH. 
2811 



Bripgeport— J. C. Booth, ' 
Dkkhv -i;it>. if. 



I) Norman St. 
Lamport. 36 Bank st. 
11 Ait third— M'-x. McKay, M Woosterel. 
new hkii.un .. i.. [obaaoB.lM Pranklin, 
New Haven— Win, Wilson, 508 Chapel st 
New London -A G Keene v 1 W. Out st. 
Norwich -P s Edmonds, 2K3 Ontini «ve. 
Nlih WALK— William A. Kelloinr, Box 31)1, 
Stamiord-R. B. McMillin, 171S Pacific st. 
Tom inotoN— I„ Hotchkiss. 25 Gen'ite st. 
Watkrnithy — Jos, K. Sandiford. 27 N Vine. 

DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA. 

I Ml). Washington- '. T. Kenvon, tllfi Rhode 
Islan,: ave., N. VV. 

FLORIDA. 

224. Jacksonville- (Col.) J. a. Sampson, 2il w. 

i'niou st. 

005, " F K. Houghton, 1H7 K. Church m. 

74. Pknsacoi.a-J. A. Lylr.317'., W. Zawagoisa 
IN, Tampa- C. 1) Hester, 2407 Tampa st, 

GEOR01A, 

43H. Atlanta-T. H. J Miller, 1(3 Venahle it 

138. AOUL.*sTA-<Col I 1'. P Lewis, lafm Philip si. 
144, MACOK — G S. liiilioii, 520 Elm si. 
SSL VaLiiosta-S. W. Itoiker. 

ILLINOIS. 

m. Bkllbvtlle -Henry Steitier, iKl", s Illlnola 
street 

70, BaiOII XlN I'AKK- 

Albany Ave 
41, Champaign— u. H. Miller, 4(17 Thomas ave 
Chicago- SecrelnTV ol District Council" 
Thoa. Neale, i»7 H. Wash st., Room 7 

rt \- .,..|, Ikll 1> I . . ... .. 



-O. Grattoti. ;WQU s. 



1. 
10. 

li, 
■a 

hi. 

m, 

'H'l. 
4IK 

II - 

m. 

an. 

ai:i. 
llt». 

A 
mt. 
in 

174. 



W. G. Schardl, 1M<K. WathiiiBt'Dst 
I, H. Stevens, oUSi Feona at, 
T J. Lellvelt, 171t) Fillmore at. 
(French) P. Hu.loii, flTf H. Center ave 
(Bohem.l John Dlonhy, IL l -l! W. 21 PI 
W. 1 



WillUm 

(Sean ) J.c Johnson m' N Washtenaw ave. 
(Gt-r.) Hermann Voell, 4m 



Uennetle 111 II Roscoe It. 

ashtena 
aullna st 



A A. Mitchell, 2K.1i 4 M M 
(iIct.) lohn Snck rau, lii'il S Oakley ave. 
(S(airs) r.iiBt. Hansen, 782 N. Rockwell it. 

ClIFt'KKN — 

Collinsvillk— Jon. Vtijtech, Lock Box 471. 
Fast ht. Loi-ib— K, Wendling, 913 HI. ave 
Knulhwood-A. Wi strom, (115(1 A tierdeen *.t. 
GAL*.HHi'R«— C. J. Johnann H711 Wish'rt ave. 
(iRip. ChoS-Sino — J. Murrnv. 121X1 ft, 71st at. 
Jtti.iKT-G H. Knnngv :HUi Klchni' .d St. 
KBHSiNiiTON-fFr,) Rd, I.apollce, 214 W. 
1 Htth st, 

KhWANHB-Chas. Winqiii-t, tl x II 
Laki-; Fiihkst- (."has. liean 
Miil INK— John Carlson. l*Jti:i 7th ave.' 
M..IH i and— H, J. Sharp, ^4tll W. Ohio st , 
Chicago 

PkORiA- J. ll. Rice, 4(V> nehrendsave. 
Phrv-H. J. BaMeschwieler, Box 560. 
yi'INCV-F, W. K.n»cher, B.Mtbat. 
KrMK Island -Wra KrueRer, Jr., 1101 4th. 
Smith Chicago— J C. Granthant, HU23 Fil- 

wards ave., Sta. S, Chicago. 
SPB i nopi Bi.n— T M. Blankenshlp. TJ1 S.Hth 
448. Wackbuah— J Demereat, 7l« County at. 

INDI \NA. 

:l-'i2 AN rkr son — Geo. Woodmanaer 235 W. 11th 
HIM. KLWtMtn- W. H. 8hnw, 1H»1 s. A. St. 
M0. Hvansvillb— F. W. Klein, bin ttdgar it. 
21 3. Hartkord Citv— H. S. Patter son. 

lNDiANAroLis — Secretary of Dial. Council 
D. D Stoddard, 144 R. Washington at. 
MO. (Ger ) J no. Riser. 1824 Singleton it. 
281. I. T Goode, ;!08 W, Maryland St. 
215. Lapavkttb-h G. Cole, 21 1:1 South at. 
MVt Marion— I, M. Simons, 0UM K Sherman at 
5H2. MoitCIB— II. P. Baker, 412 S. Franklin *t. 
4». Tint Haotk-A. Valentine. 724 S, 10th st. 

I Taylor, 13B6 Perry at 

f,Jr,.8S,K.7lbst 



I Vi, 

m. 

2ti. 
HI. 

Wi. 

IttL 

IMt. 
IIMi 
1UU. 

It). 



INDIAN TERRITORY. 

162 Mvskooek-J. P. Hoamer. 

IOWA. 

315 Booms— G. L McKlroy. 
i,l BL'KLUIOTOX -J. nacn man. Mft'iS. Central av, 
Ail. Davbnport- w c. Meyere, i;i- Bradv st. 
Iihi Dks MotNKs-r. s. C. BadRley, i;it«2lstst. 

ppsponK-M. R. Kogan, -in'^ih st 
7ii7. OTTVMWA-J.W.Motrison, 11US. Jefferson st 

KANSAS. 

189, Kansas City- M K Holland,. iWTauromee 
ave. 

IV. I.KAVKNVfokTii - Jno K. Crcssley. .nh and 
Sherman. 

158, Tofi-kA- A M II. Claudy, 4<fc Tyler st, 

2ul wichita-j L Taylor, sSoCwafe at, 
KENTUCKY. 

712 Co vington- C. Glatting, W**l Kavanangh st 

7s.i •■ (Ger,) B. Kampaen, wi W. lath at, 
412. Hopkinrvillk— W *i Hall. 
UW, Lol'ISVille— II S. II liftman 17:<7<;allaR her 
214 •• (Ger.l J Schneider I ISM F. Jacob av. 
u:"* NEWPORT— W, H Wiuk, BS2 LVntral nvc 

LOUISIANA. 

Ni w Orlkans— Srcr-ctaiv of l>ist Council 
r, 6, Wetter. 22-1> Josephine at, 
78. Aug. Limbers 711 P.mchersl 
71)4 F. liuhrkop. HIT c".niin st. 
V B) M , Inaipmi. l:H'4 m Roche ave 
85. Siihkvi pohi- 1„ Malkns, Boi2til. 

MAINE. 

407. LewibTon— C. F. Tinker, II Turner at, 
Auburn. 

MARYLAND. 

2M. BaltimorS-W. H. Ketuan, l.ilM W. Mul- 
berry st. 

44. " (Ger.) H. It. Schroeder. 230H Canton ave, 

Massachusetts. 

Boston- Secretary of Dist. Council. II, M, 
Taylor, lit) Whillield st., Dorchester. 
33. " C.J. Gallagher, h Rand PI, Koxbury, 
E. BoaroN-c. M. Dempsev 272 Meridian st. 
Pall River— Isiaa Dion, l' 2 j Suffolk St. 
Haverhill— R. A. Clam. 3t; Dudley at. 
lli.voiiAM - H. K. Wheiity Box 113. 
HolVoke— F. Marchaod, 4(lCa><nt st. 
Ht'osoN— Geo. K. Bryant, Box 125. 
LAWK BNCR— Win, C. Grnimrl, 17 Crosby si 
LRNOX -P. II. Caunavan, Bui 27. 
Lowell— Frank A. Kappler 2M1 Lincoln si 
M ahiileheap— R. H. Roach, H Him Ct, 
M iKi.HORo— J. U. Druohue, H7 ~choot st. 
New Bkheord— C.G. Fratici- -18 North St. 
Ni WTON— r L, Connors, S2 West St. 
N.jktii ADAMS- O. W. Houghton. 1 Ryon's 
Lane. 

PiTTSEiEt.D— Chus. Hvde. Id Booth's place. 
Koxni'KV- H, M. Taylor, lit! Whitfield at, 

Ilorchenter. 
SPRiNiifiKLD- (French) P. Provost, Jr.. Box 
48Ti t Merrick. 
P. J. Collins. I'M't State st 
WBsThelh— W J Pa leiiteau, ^7 Orange St. 
Worcester- W A Ros^ley, 6 City View ave 



Jls 

ttt 

H2 
4J1 
12.1. 
Ki I 
111. 

sta 

4M. 
221 
151, 
401 
27, 
IW, 

411 

Ii7 



222 
23 



I as. 

I Hi. 

I». 

PW 

lk) 

178, 

KM I 

.W. 

:tl4. 

48 



MICHIOAN. 

ALPKNA— B. D. Kt'lly, 41ti Taw as it 
Bay City- K. G. ('.ales, 2lf> N. Birney at 
DRTROiT— T S Jordan. 427 Benufait ave. 
GrandRapi pa- A . De Boer, 217 E. Grove at . 
Hancock— Louia Verville. 
Mi'NisiNci— A. L. Johnson. 
Mt'SKKilON — Harley W. Starke, II Marshall 
Saoinaw — P. Flinch, .Wl Ward St., K. S, 

Henrv Wettlsiiftr, 1W17 Madison it, 
s avli St. Marie — A. St owe! 1 ,282 Portage av. 

MINNESOTA. 

alii. DCLDTR-John Knox, Box 283, W. Duluth. 

7. Minneapolis- limning Sttibee, J303 E. 22d 
2iMt Red I.akb Pali S— N. Holl.eTg. 
87. St. pAt'i.—Nels Johnaun, 7OT Martin at. 

MISSOURI. 

Kansas City— Secretary of Dial, council, 
John Kirk. 4(M E, 12th st. 
75. J. K- Chnffiii, 22-20 T roost ave. 
HH), H. S. Thayer 2V. W.2»thst. 
21.1. E. H. Price, 1718 Michigan ave. 
110. ST, JosRi H— wro. Zimmerman. 1223 N 13tb 
St. Lonts-secretarv of District Council, 
R. Puelle, 604 Market it. 
5 (Ger.)Wm Lamoiert. lMIOLamlil, 
4.5 (Ger.) W. Wamhcff. 14111 Montgomery at 
47. fGer.S A. Hoffmann . 2121 Victor at 
73 Geo, C. Newman 7( 3 N. I5th st. 
257 I. A. Steinlnger, 3ii35 Lucky st 
578 {Stair Bldrv) Hdw. Bruggemann, 2«24 Mad>- 



MONTANA. 

R8 anaconda— C. w Starr, Box 238. 
25tl Belt — Andrue Kckerson. 
112. Buttb City— C. F. Nugent, Box (123, 
2811 Great Falls— O M. Ijimbert, Box "23 
I VI Hhlkia- Jacoli Splndler,l,f2:i Mackinaw at, 

28, MlBSOttLA-M. C. Pepple. 

NEBRASKA. 

427 Omaiia-J. II. Maui.Hil S, 2Kth st 

NEW JERSEY. 

750. Asnm v PARX-Wm. H. Carr, Box B97. 

488. Ba voNNl — P. A. Miller, 13 K ,Ud at. 

121 ilkiDciHTON-J. H. Reeves, 145 Fay el teat 

20. Camden — T. H. Peteraon. 430 Walnut at 
217, H. oranok— L, P. Sherrer. 34 Bedford at 
187. Eli/aRRTH— H Zimmerman 'Uu s,-,uib st 
8K7. " (Gerj John Kuhn II Spencer it 
2bW Hacxbnsack— T. Heath. 312 inlon at. 
3)11. Ho bo ken— A. Crothers, 131 Jack son at 
4H7. " (Ger.) H Sievers, 400 Monroe st 

57. IkviNOTON— Chas. Vim Wett 
IIB Jersey City— Job O. Hunt, 440 Commuiii 
paw are. 

482. *' I, F Ryan, IK1 Ninth St. 

OH*. (J. C Heights) John Handorf, North st. and 
Boulevard. 

l.'il, LONt; BkANCH-Chaa. E. Brown, Box 341 

Long Branch City, 
232 MiLMORN-J H. While, Short Hills. 
:m Mii.i.villk-Jbs, McNeal, 1122 w. Main at 
42D Miintclaib— Jas. McLeod, 141 Forest at . 
«38 Morristiiww— C. V. Deals. Lock Box 183 

NB S*2 I_8e ;i 1 ? , u '.^ of ; P ,,trlct Council, W 
M. Shew, 416 Plane at 



IIM H. G. Long, 10 Davis st, E Newark. 

120 (Ger.) Fred, tei* ImM S. IKth st. 

lis. Hctui. Heuii, 427 S, 7.h st. 

SOU. A. L. Heeglc. 120 > -'o -t 

7.'1 (Ger.) G. Arendl, . 7 tfl .".pnug field ave. 

310 OkANOE-M. Morlock, 17 Pai liinsi.n Ter. 

3'> Pa I kr.son -P. pi. Van Houten. 713 K. 27tli st 

III. 1'Asswc-Geo. A Qutmby, 328 Montgomery 

m Piarii Asnmi M 1 1 Bath, 3:1 Lewis st. 

ho. PiitLLipanrkfl w. s Gerriaon, 8 Fayette at 

l i. Pi.aini lEi.n-W-ti H Lunger, M4 Wist< r- 

velt ave., N. PlaisfieM 
31 Trenton-J.J R.mrke 2..Maikelst. 
Sit Union II ill- (Get Ij. Worischek , 721 Adam 
St., Hubokcu. 

NEW YORK. 

271. Alha.w- L. H. Harvey, tD38dtt 

n.50. " (Ger.) Wm. J. Franklin. 4.50 Elk st 

(i AMsrrnii\M -l.estei Ctivev, 20 Miltun at, 
451. Ai-'iii-KN-F. H. Kooii. IK. ['ratiltliii st 
21. BATAVIA-F S. Booth 142 Harvester ave. 
233 HiNi.il AMPiuN — V. W Sicklor, 42 Walnut si. 
UkouKlvn— Secrelary Of District Council , 
Chas. P'tiedi-l G8 liimiod st* 
12. Otto Z.eibig. 1 132 De Kn)t> a te 

(Ger.Cab. MkrR.) H, M unster, 37 1 Palmetto st 
Kdw. Toll 1(1. M schtiu'k ave.. >wt. SI a. 43 
M I. Casey. Ki Newell st. 
c K Blown, 272 Howmrrt aee. 
w F, Host wick, el; Kotbllng at. 

Cbaa. D. Monioe. 12 St, Malk'save. 
M Spear*, I", Pulaski st 
(Ger) F Kiamer. .'.<i> llarmannat. 
S K Elliot [, I'.H'a St Mark's ave. 
Wm. Carroll. 7U2 Her^en st. 
It. s fh ui her ;!lsii |.',Ui st, 
J.,s U itchell. 31 1 .-,3d ,t 
Bi'eeai o ~S;vT t tatv ol District Council. 

W. WrcL'Hitt. 7s PUlward st. 
W. li, WrcgglU,78 Fdwaid s|. 
iller ) Juu. ('. roele. ftW Doatst, 
K. O. Vokoiu. Ill l *e ig si son ave. 
J, !L Myers 83 l.atnlon st 
Csihhes— A Van Arnam 22 George St. 
Collei.k Point— G. A. i*icktl,5th ave and 
11th st 

Far Rmckawav— H Ward, P O, Box 1 It* 
KiSHKii.i. ns-lli dsun W W Kowe, Box 215 
Flubii in.. - F fr l-ielil, l.'tl New I.oc ust si . 
«knb'' v-i. W Dadson, 20 Hollent»ck avr 
i.LE.vs Falis H. J. White. 10 Gage ave. 
Hbmfs ri- ad - S. H. Chester, fl^x s2 
Irvinis ton — Rol*rt Brown, Hamulus on 
Hudaoo, 

Ithaca — H, A Whitinc.v Auburn st 
Jamestown -O. IJ. Bruilh, TIN H Second st 

KINaMRI --Ji.hu K l-..r»liay, Wtl I'niou 

ave,. New York City 
Kingston- K. C l*elersou. '207 Smith ave 
Little Falls— T. R. Mangan. 142 W. Mon- 
roe. 

Long Island City- W. Pin man, "sil Jamaica 
ave. 

MAMAHo.vr.ck-Chas, F. Tooker. 
MT. Vi.kMiN— A. 11. Parker, .73 W. Lincoln 
avenue 

Jas. Beardsley. 3_' N. Ulh ave. 
Newiu'ro- John Templctua. If* Ren wick. 
Nh« liocHELLE-J. V. Gaitaii. M> Birch at 
NBWTPWX, L. I -Pettr A. Anderson, Bos IS, 

Corona. N ^ , - 
Nr.w York Secretarv* of District Council, 

D F Penlhrrstou. 30M W. 14;ki st. 
J. J. Hewitt m K WH st. Cate Neilan. 
{Floor Layers) J. Hefner, 411 Stein way ave . 
L I. City. 

Thus. P. J Cole ma ll, 7K8 111 h ave. .Care Molle. 
(Jewish) Jo n Goldfarh, *4 H Il3thst 
(Ger, Cab. Makers! Simon Isiiehl, 224 1st av. 
D. Vauderl»ek, W W. 12Klh si. 
(Ger.) F. W. Muel ler^»>35 Morris uve. 
H. Seymour 1(18 1*1. 87th. 
(Scan.) t). Wallin, 24 W IIMh st 
(Ger ) Vincent Banter, ii77 Courtland ave. 
Jas. M 'ignite, 223 Helantej at 
Wm, Trotter, 7<M hih ave. 
Wm. E. P. Schwartz, 2 Brown's polnl, 

Ailotia, L. I 
J, J. Plaeger. ;«I7 ;kl ave. 
(Ger.) G>o. Beithobl, 32 1 F. 12lh it. 
John Mct'.rail, 171 E 82nd st. 
(Ger.) Jno. H. Borrs. l/i7i ave A. 
tl-r Caradiani Geo. Menard, 157 E. 78lh at 
Chas. Camp, 223 W 118th st. 
(Ger, Millwrights and Millers) Henry Maak 

357 Linden st , Brooklyn 
Nyack-R F. Wool. Box 4M3. 
On bo nt a — C W. Bnrnside. )' Walling ave. 
Peek skill— C. T. Pom ell SOU Bimnsoti pi 
Pohtc ll BBTkk— Prank Stepr.en, 2l:i Mail I- 
■on ave. 

PortcjiiKEEPSlF — J. P. Jacohson, Box 32. 
RocHEBTER- H. M. Fletcher, 5 Snyder si. 

(Ger.) Frank Schwind.' 4 May PI 
" John Duehrte. :W Bucban Park. 
Scrensctauy — Henrv Bain, 328 Craig st 
Sta I EN Island— See-etary Dist. C- unci], 
J W. Sheehaii, 174 Bioadivav, West New 
Jiriahtoti 

PORT Richmond- J Keenan, 2!W Jersey st , 

New liiighton 
Staplkt.in— P. J, Ktee Box 54,". 
SVkACi'SB— Seetetarv of I list let . outicil, 

D C. Paike. 517 Reutuck ave 
(Ger ) J, R. Kvan 125 Gebhardt ave 
K K Battey, ?.I7 F, Genesee st 
A. J. Lsiuirande, 250 Gertrude. 
Tmv — Kavid King Hoi 115 
Utica-G W. Griffitht. 24f) IM 'ley ave. 
WaTRkTi'WN-W I Mullen, 121 A. Main st. 
WESTcni sikh Cm .st rv— Secretary of Dis- 
lncl Conr.cll, Jas. Gagan, 111) Hugenot, 
New Rochelle N Y 
Weitc ii RBTEk-- Frank Vauderpool, Blon> 
dell ave 

WHITKBTONE-Geo, Ilellon, Box 8 
Williams Br i nr. r— John Hdgley, White 

Plains ave . be'. 1st itid 2nd sli. 
YohkkrS-E. C Hulae, 47 Mai le st 

F. M Tallmadge, 218 Elm it. 

NORTH CAROLINA. 

384. ABBR vlLLk— G. C. Luraley., 1 )! Blanton st 

OHIO. 

84. Akron— A, H Bales. IKfl N Howard it 
17. Bella lax—G. W, Cu tt is. 3it«x Harrison at. 
170 BRIDUBi'ORT— John D Glenn, Box 41 . 
110 HoCYkra— Wm. Rem, M'JL' v. Rensselaer at 
24i Camiiriimir-V. C Ferguson 037 E. Btubeti- 
vllle ave. 

141. Canton -Chas. A. RimmeS, 525 N. McKinley 
ave. 

C i V i n hat i -Secret urv of District Council, 
I. H Meyer, M Mercer st 
2. J. E Overbecke, 2022 llackberry st, Walnut 
Hilts 

a00. (O-r ) Auguat Weiss, 18111 Geat at. 

327 (Mill) H. Brink worth 13|r, Spring st 

H28 A. Herger. 422H Fergua st. 

W17 D. J. Jones. 222H Kenton it .Station D. 

678. Jos. Lang, Box 301, Carthage. 



32 
I'M. 
128. 
117 
17 V 

21; 

2.s 

3,ll. 

;si 

1.1 

471 

(ill. 



H 

IM 

371 
110 

H I, 

Old. 

si. 
323 
71 1 
1 ST. 

22:1, 

m 

140. 

603. 
88 
40 

2.', I , 

Shi. 

31 

157 
212. 

ma 

3i 1 1 
12 

507. 



St. 

5rl. 

84. 
200. 
30U 
310 
375 
3SJ. 
4-">7. 
481 
48S 
473. 
47(1. 

47H. 
4H7. 

ttm. 

513. 
71)7. 
715. 
788 

474. 
101 

183. 
77. 

203. 
72, 
I7M 
231. 
148 



006 

.W7 



15 
2rl 

102 
78 

12^ 



172, 

128 

6M3 

273 
720 



UL\ J. P. Luckey, 2427 Bloom st 

Cleveland— secrelary ol District Council. 
R A, Moran I r i8 Super loi St., Room 10 
II. II L. Lepole. 1H Foe avr. 
:t(». (H.ihent.) V. Plccmuy, l">|ewttt st 
3!tl (Ger ) Theo, Helbricli In Pa i ker ave. 
411 (Ger ) Albert Kirp '3 L lai k st. 

01 COL V MUCK A C. Welch. 1 127 Highland st 
101 Dan ion W. C. Smith, 13^ S. La Utile st 

311 lOer.JJos. W i rth , 'M I Clover st. 
3-S B. LtVtmrooL W W Paileii ISM Third st. 

hit. Hamilton w. c mhsch 5SiV Heaion at. 

Hi l.nu-M E Speer, 111]' second st 

7)1 Loi kl and- Cmrlea K Hertet, Box 183. 
3«i MAfttRTTA— J w* Pw eater. 8 Wttater fame 
h-si home hoy- k i> will 

417. Pi.KTSMorrti- C. Thoman, 1 10 Canrribell 
ave 

110 Sti- i iiENVlLi.E D H. Peterson 700 Adatas 
2t t Tiki in R. S Dysinger, Heil^rs s|. 

2 , i'm.iini Martin Teiwilliifet, lOSO Door st 
I8S ' IGer.) P. Uortz, I£18 Palmer M. 

171 Yni'NiisTinvN — W, S Sloyer, 715 Augusta s|, 
718 Zanksvii.le — Frtd. Kaiipes. Central ave. 
10th Ward 

OREOON. 

50 Portland David Henderson, Box 548. 

PENNSYLVANIA. 

Alma tilt MY City — 
211 J. W. Pills, isl WnsiiniHtOn nve. 
237 (Ger.) A. Weiiman (^1 Troy 11 ill road 
135 ALi.KMTiiwN -a M. Mayer, 186 N 5ih «t 
218. BI'.avkr Palls a. ourry. Box nil, New 

Brlgtrton, 

408. Bi Tiir.KiiEM l.M.SwIiiker 412 Broadwai 

s Bethlehem, 

121 Bmi.HiiD-ll, 11, McQuown. 55 Wash n tt 

2IT Cms. er- Fber S K ighy . 318 I .. l iilh st 

211 KasToN- i'lank 1'. I lorn. Mil Butler si. 

12! Gt.RMANTi.WN- ), K Martin, I2H F Dues! 

i n GREKNsin'Kii— j i k row,-, gati Concord, 

24,*. HarrisuI Ri. - W. iiuhner, 222 I'elTrr st 
lit Ha/letiin -Chas. slover 440 W. Green -I 
244 ItiMESTEAD - K- 1 win Row- Ir . L Box 527 
BH List. *stkk Jns Smith. L'i.i Chester st 
201 N w ■ asti.i Wm. W hile '£> Cat sou st . 
,'M ! New Ki nsin.,tiin— C. S, Auititbach, 
2t'.2 Peckyii.i.b T. I' Spa ngeu burg. 

Phil tot- 1 pniA-Sec, District C< uncll. Toll : . 
WjUsun, 'MH Jasper at., Station K. 
^ »' c Hall. 1 1 > I S. Nineleenth "I. 
227. (KeiuittCtonl John Watsoti, '201s Jasper St 

station K. 
21 s (tier ) JoaeL-h Oven S14 N Fourth st. 
85B ( MHI) J. Dnerioger, Jr. IMX* H Hunttngdon 
PiTTRui'R', H — Secreinry of District Council. 
I. G , Snyder 112 Grant at. 
112 14. G Schninaker l.'ti Sherman ave.. A' leu 
101 (Oct.) P. I'.eck 2l:ci I'us.in si 
I0"i ( K. Knd) II. Roberlsnti. :L".' Princeton pi 
2i: (; W. McCnuslaid. I:«) Lambeit at. E. F. 
2KJ. w. J Kichey. IMH Caisun st 
Ml. f'.rr.) Louis Pauker »Ci Eureka st . 31 Wit 
151 Pi.vmiu'TII- G H. KdwsnU Hoi 104O 

54.1 S-CRANTON- H. C. ScOlt, 737 I^« C Urt 

1st s. Scr ANTi.N--(Ger ) T. suauh, rear W S 
Main ave. 

37. shasii.kiv 11 A I, Smink 110 F Carrier, n 
2'i4 SHARON- K. II. MiClerry, IMX 501. 
757 Twi.'.a — C.eorite Wick a, Unit 4". 

Ml. WiLKr-s BarhE-D A pr.at 17 (.'ir.derel la it 
loj Alt Avers, 51 Perm a 1 . 

11)1. ViiRk -C Snyderoan.WI'N West M. 

RHODE ISLAND. 

I7B Newpokt P, ll Dawlev. Is L.vi-. st 

312 pAWTt CKHT -J. B. Paiquei. Box Is.:. VxlieK 

Falls 

Ml Providence - P Dolan, Lawn st 
117 Wi.t.NsocKKT-J A Piaray SHircnaid >1. 

SOUTH CAROLINA. 

52 CHAkl.KSTiiH-lCol )John Pliicknry.r list 
«M. CiiLfMioA -(Col.) C. A. Thompson, 1523 H. 
Taylor st. 

SOUTH DAKOTA. 

1M7 Lkad Citv-R M Spink. 

TENNESSEE. 

2.5M. Jackson li E Holland KM LOSJ St. 
225 KhdxvILLe — W. W. Ramsey. 310 Po'isha si. 
IS8 M»«t>Hl»—(CoL) H C Fllison 24 Dupree St. 
3»4. J E. Wright, st'J Manassas st, 

TEXAS. 

¥» ArSTiN-j B. Wttih, 505 w 11th st 
185. Cleburne — J. C. i.recn. L. Box Dfltl. 
1HH DALLAs-Wtn, Welkins, Box 21M 
371 Denison— W. W. Neighbour, 1315 W. 
Gandy ave. 
Galvi-ston — Secretanr of D strict Council. 

M. C, Bnwdei., dOi'Mihsl. 
528. J. H Proc or, 141 1 IMih n 
«ll. (Get ) Charles L. WhIIct 2118 Ave. M 
114 Hc.i sriiN E Shoop, ,'lOCaplloi ave. 
53. OaAN'it. C B Payne. 

480 San A n ' < iniu — (Gci . ) Aug. Rie». 302 Plum. 
717. " 1 A G.Wietxel llf. Cent , e st 

822 Waco- A. K WIdmer, Laluir Hall. 

UTAH. 

M. Salt Larr Citv-F. C Hodder, 1111 E 5 h 
So. it. 



VERMONT. 



Sr. Albans Gto w. 
Welden at. 



, 12 Low. i 



WASHINGTON. 



StsATTt.ts— Fred. Blenklni, Kremont. 
Sp<ikanr-J A. Andtrberg, E. 524 Blaine. 

WEST VIRGINIA. 



Faih MOUNT 



5* 



Steal, y. 

Hickman. 42H Benuu 



131. 
Il« 



238 
428 

3. Whkrlin(.-A L. Bauer, 1819 Jacob st 

WISCONSIN. 

888 Grf.rn Bay-H Meiiter, 1128 Ctterrv at. 
181, Kenosha— H, C Goteltue, 73U Paikave. 
MlLWAi.'RER— Secretary of Dlilrict Council 
Charles Heutr, 501 Twenty 5 Kb it 

30 (Ger.) John Dellmau. Il4rll7lhst. 

71. (Millwra) W. Trautmann 1221 Vli.tat 
188. Aug. J. Hagen. 781 34th st 
328, (Ger.) R. Meyers, 788 lMh ave. 
522 (Ger.) Chaa, Runge. lrW5 I.Iovd at. 
252 OBfixoBR-Caaper Fluor f» Grove at. 

«. Racms-M. G King 1517 Philllpaa»e 



THE CARPENTER. 



MORRILL'S PERFECT SAW SETS. 

Bench Stops. Car 8ealers. 

Universal Punches. 

Cutting Nippers. 

Charles Morrill, 

35 Warren Street, New York. 






U. B. C. A J. of America Society 
ESTABLISHED 1666. 

CHAS. SVENDSENi 

UAKBFACTDSM OW 




Regalia and Badges. 

Society Hit* and Bannera Mmafat 




KAMMACHER 
eCHLEMMEH 
&CO. 

AGO BOWERY 



Mo. ao East Court St.. 



United Hatters of North America 




Reed & A uerbaclier » 

289 BOWERY, 



NEW YO 



CIXY, 



lithi Colon 
<»• rmm 



7M are buying • ft>» hat. wither -oil or 
,M* t* It that tha Genmna Onlor abet la 
e4tn it Ifaretalterhaalooieta^riainbU 
*iid ofFera to put one In a hat for 
him. The chances are that 



Tta« genuine Union Label la perforated on the 
•mr edges exactly tb« Mint aa a tioatagc atatun. 

JOHN A. MOfKlTT, Pre.,, 
PtUXUrR, Soa r, Orange, H. J. 

«TT Park A*e.. Brooklyn. M. T. 



Fine Tools. 



A Complete line of 
everything good 
in Carpenters* 
and Joiners' 
TOOLS. 

Send for our Toot Catalogue. 

LOUIS ERNST & SONS 

129 & 131 East Main St 

ROCHESTER, N. ¥• 

ECLIPSE ADJUSTABLE [FOLDING SQUARE 



The three Illustrations of the Eclipse 
Adjustable folding Square shown herr- 
wlth, exhibits the square open, partially 
cloaed or act for angles, and that. The 
ImproTetueut in making Folding Squares 
constats In securing the short b'ade by 
two clamping pistes and screws wh'rrby 
they are held rigid while being us*d aa a 
square. It also forma a locking device 
when tbe aquare >a fold d, which can 
readily leareat by the depressed portion 
of the clam ping plates which slide in a 
groove provided for the same. Whin 
cloaed it can be folded and packed In a 
am all cheat provided for the lame, and 
can be adjusted at right angles ready for 
In kit a. at use when Tt quired. It does away 
with cutting holes in th top or aidea of 
small cheat* and la protected from being 
bent or rus'ed when left standing or 
1 to tbe wrathrr Further lnfor- 
! obtained from the 

ZIHK * LARK 



m 




;:^, n ;Ai,Ji,ti.lj l , i',1:J 



THE FINZER TOBACCOS 



UNION LABEL GOODS 

(Union Label on each box.) 



Every Union Man should aid THE NATIONAL TOBACCO 
WORKERS UNION by using one or more of the fol- 
lowing brands: 

OLD HONESTY PLUG 

JOLLY TAR PLUG 

CANTEEN PLUG 

BOOT JACK PLUG 

WILD ROSE SMOKING 

FIVE BROTHERS PIPE SMOKING 

iB-Any dealer will order ANY BRAND you prefer. 



Wm. McNiece A- Son, 



PHIL.ADBI.PHIA, PA. 

HAirtrpACTuacaa or 

and, Panel 

and Rip Sows, 

FROM THE VERT BEST CAST STEEL. 



H 



Warranted the Best in the World 




This Label ia printed in black Ink on light bine 
paper, and la paated on the cbrar box. Don't all 
It up with lie D. a 

la nearly of a 



against 

goods. 



First Class Books, 

CHEAP, PRACTICAL AND DBIfOL, 



By li eater 



HAND MADE, 



sd Btmsixa). 

us 

ft Quids »d F*tim>*ob'b 
Paics Book. Hodgson . . ft 19 

_ aa Btkk. SqcAM, *«d Bo* as It 1 M 
fsicrictL Uwmtii, Hod fa-- . . . . 1 •• 
Srjn-BiTiLDiiro Him Kami. Hodgson . 1 •# 
Bud iLtiuaa Made Kav 1 at 

■ AID Bultoia'a Goal- ^ ^ 

F. J. MoOrnis, 



IMPROVED 

Labor-Saving 

CARPENTERS' 

TOOLS. 



STANLEY 

RULE & LEVEL CO. 
New Britain, Conn. 

SOLD BY ALL 

Hardware Dealers. 



Stanley's Adjustable Circular Plane. 




Thta Plane has a Flexible Steel Face, which can be „ 
shaped to any required arc, either concave or convex, by turn- 
Intr the Knob on the front or he Plane. 

No. 1 13. Adjustable Circular Plane. 1 J ia. Cutter, 14.00 



V 



THE CARPENTER. 




Lane's 

BALL BEARING 

Parlor Door Hanger 



Ball Bearing. 



Combines all th« valuable features of 
tio "LANE STANDARD" w»h 
the best form of BICYCLE BEAR- 
INGS. Ask your dealer for LANE 
HANGERS and send to us for catalogue' 
We have other good* that will Interest you 



LANE BROTHERS COMPANY 

422-54 Prospect Street 

P0U6HKEEPSIE, M. Y. 




Norcross Brothers 

CONTRACTORS AND BUILDERS 

160 Fifth Avenue, New York 
Tremont Building, Boston . . 
Worcester, Mass. . 



1 fox s lock mortising: tool. 




TW. lathe Tool that aa«» one-hall the time in putting in Door Lock.. It', the cnr»e that 
*um 1 It. Why M 1 Bec*u*f 80,000 carpenter, hj io. For aale by the trade, or aent po«t-pald on 
rawipt ef price, |l.0O. Write for circular. 



P. L. FOX & CO. ( SOLE MANUFACTURERS 

BRIDGEPORT. CONN. 



P. C. ECKHARDT 

General Contractor $ Builder 

693 Ninth Avenue 



Between 47th and 48th Street* 



TELEPHONE 1050-38 



NEW YORK 




Adjustable and Folding H'dle 0. K, 
MANUFACTURED BY 

A. J. Wilkinson & Co. 

180-188 Washington St. 

boston, mass. 




We will make you to order a penknife 
like cut above, with your picture and 
name theieoo, with chamois case, for one 
dollar, or a big two-bladed Carpenter's 
Knife with German silver cap, black 
handle. 75 cents, or tortoise obeli handle, 
one dollar. Blades warranted to stand 
hard wood coping. 



E LOCK WOO I) 



WO 



Sworn Circulation of THE CARPENTER 
19,000 COPIES MONTHLY 

AiTertUlmf Mt4>n. fe r Tool Miaifaclaren, Wood Working Machinery 
******* Laakor aad Batldla* Material!. Ala* of Special AOutage U 




ARE 
YOU 
A 

UNION 

MAN? 

THEN 

STAND 

UP 

FOR 

THE 

PRINCIPLES 
OF 

OR0ANIZED 

LABOR 

AND 

WEAR 

UNION 

MADE 



(Jet your- dealer to buy thaae gooda-he'll do it for the e.kina end you'll help th. OR IO* 
cause — or we'll .end you tape measure, samp In* and self miMuremiat blank, with a 
dainty gilt edged Russia leather pooket memorandum book free. 

HAMILTON CARHARTT & COMPANY, DETROIT, MICHIIAN, 

UNION MAD! 



00 

3 



CD 



o 



CO 



LaJ 

CO 



CO 



< 



CO 



UJ 




ANCHOR BRAND 
Adze Eye Nail Hammers. 




LARGEST MANUFACTURERS IN THE WORLD. 

FayettH R. Plumb, Fhila., 



PATENTS 



Qaliklr taini. OV* ril DPI WEI* HHIT 
OlTilllD. K«nd inndtl lllllch or photo, »uti 
iwriptlon for IrMMportutopiUnUbilitT t> FABI 
EajTP«BO0E nut. Cistunl r.f.r«noM and tall 
mfonn.lloa. W»ITI FOR 00FT OF OtJl SFECLtL 
Orm. Itlitliimoithtoml iirNt^iuioa •nr tud* bf 
. Hl*at attomtr, and EVERY IN VI II TOE IBOrni 
llill ft b«fcir* applji&f far paU&t. Addrvn i 

H.B.WILLSON&CO. 

PATENT UAYCRS, 

usnrttauc.. WASHINGTON, D. C. 



For Advertising Rates 

IN 

THE CARPENTER 

Apply to 

P. J. McGUIRE, 

134 North Ninth Street, 
PHILADELPHIA, PA, 




W. S. Thomson 

Manufacturer and Dealer in 

WOOD WORKERS' SUPPLIES 

Belting, Belting Hooka, Lacing, Band 
and Circular Saws, Filei, Emery Wheels, 
Babbit Melal, Planing Machine Knivea, 
Cutter*, Etc. 

418 and 420 Wtat 27th St. New Yark 

All Order, by Hall Promptly Attended Ta>. 




\ 



A Monthly Journal for Carpenters, Stair Builders, Machine Wood Workers, Planing Mill Men, and Kindred Interests. 



VOL. XIX.-No. 3, 1 
Established 1881. 1 



PHILADELPHIA, MARCH, 1899. 



Fifty Cents P«r Year. 
Slnple Copies, 5 Cts. 



H ^ n iLSL^i^^"'W^ & mm, 

SAWS, FILES AND TOOLS FOR THE MARKETS OF THE WORLD. 

No. 12 Hand Saw. 




Our Saws have all the Latest Improvements, and are warranted superior to all others. 

Th*-v have no rival in Quality, finish, and general utility, and are made from the best steel, and of superior temper. The grinding, by our New and 
Imoroveu Machine, y in use only by us, makes Them ihe easiest running Saws in the world. They have gwr^d a umversal reputation among mechanic^ 
anTare sold by "ll the prominent Wholesale and Retail Hardware Dealers in America and Europe. The manufactures of this firm have secured the h.ghest 
Premiums at all the World's Great Fairs, where they have been exhibited. 

And we Ousrantee a Better Article, at the same Price, than any other House In the World. 

IB FULLY WARRANTED 



TAINTOR 
POSITIVE 
SAW SET 



and* of «>la tool 
kin b.en m il, anA th.y 
are Uthlf oommandMl by 
A l.L h tin a*, th.m. 




ALL QOOD S BKAHINO ODR NAME 

If jour Hardware D«al- 
«r tloaa not handle t h* in, 
don't take an Inferior aet 
li.naa.. Mma on* nay a, 
If. Ju.t aa «;oad.'» , 

TAINTOR MFG. CO. 

9 to 15 MURRAY ST. 

YORK. 





UNION CARPENTERS ASK FOR 



FOR SALE BY DEALERS IN BUILDERS HARDWARE 




THE ONLY ABSOLUTELY N0I8ELE8S 
DOOR HANGER ON THE MARKET... 



NEWBURGH, KEYSTONE, UNION-MADE 

Overalls, Coots, Pants Carpenters 1 Aprons 



Your dealer will gladly 
furnish you these ex- 
cellent goods if you ask 
for them. 



Cut, 

Made, 

Sold, 



Right. 



CLEVELAND & WHITEHILL CO. 



sr. 



Por Bottom Prices 
Mention this Paper 



The MCabe Parlor 
Ikxjr Hanger, No. a 



The McCabe Hanger Manufacturing Co. 

532 W 22d Strott N, V. City. 



PIKE'S LILY WASHSTA 



MOORE'S 

IMPROVED WROUGHT STEEL STORM 
WINDOW FASTENERS 




The Best DilstanB on Earth. 



A tait-cuUlng,e»an»grMted .tone, Imparts a fine edge 



ut-cuttlnit. 
coarae-grit 
• nd g 



and hard medium-fino'siit. 
KM* ran tec to give abaulu 



Put up In two grade*— i r,, aott medium, 
alone labeled, telling whether haid or wilt, 



._.ute aaliftactlgn. The time atone made in gouge 
ipa and .11 special .hape* All leading hardware de.lera. 



Send for Catalog of Scythe .tones, Dltitonei, Razor Hone*,, Kilfe 

THE! PIKE MFG. CO. PIKE STATION, N. H. 




With these fasteners, storm windows can 
be'ad justed more easily, and held In place 
more securely, than in any other way yet 
invented. 

NO LADDER REQUIRED. 

Fastened from the inside, the only tool 
necessary being a small hammer. 
Send for Circulars. 

The Stanley Works, a*. 

NfcW BRITAIN, CONN. 

7q Chambers St., N. Y. 



THE CARPENTER. 



HIGH GRADE MACHINERY 




FOB 



No & Vaeiktt Wood Woiiii. 
A tnoet valnehle machine for Carpenter*, 
Bulldera, 8a*h, Door and Blind Makers, eta, 
M on It you can perform * variety of work 
which would otherwise require the uie of 




CARPENTERS, BUILDERS, SASH, 
DOOR, BLIND MAKERS, ETC. 

Keti mate* on Single Machine* m Equipment* 
cheerfully far u I abed. 

Ask f»r "Wood Worker" Catalogue 

J. A. Fay & Co., 

«» 514-534 W. Front St., 

CINCINNATI, OHIO. 



STANDARD WOOD WORKING MACHINERY 




OF EVERY DESCRIPTION. 

of »nj thing tn war ItBopar 



>m, U 



Mtalofua frtt If 
ill for It 



NO. 3. 1'l.ANFK. MaTCHBR AMD Mnt t I'tU. 

Plane*, one aide, 24 Inches wide by 8 Ijiehea 
thick. 

Matches 13 Inches wide; 
An Invaluable machine fur a .mall or medium 
■iced .hop. 



The Egan Company, 



400-4*- W. Fre-i Street, 

^ CINCINNA TI, 01 



FOOT 4 HAND POWER MACHINERY 

COMPLETE OUTFITS. 
Carpenter, tad Builder* without .team power 
can aucceaalully compete with the large ihopa 
by using our New Labor Saving machinery 

Sold ON TRIAL. Sens roe Catmooue A. 

SENECA FALLS MFG. CO. 

1, N. Y., V. S. A. 




No. 128 Ouliide Moulder 
Built to work 7, 8, 9. 10, 13 u wide 



Write for further information 
Alao for aew cstalogur 




Afw ms @w 

aj ~a ■ 

SlrlPLE, PfJA,«Tr»AlJ 




s 



THE SQUARE ROOT 
DELINEATOR 

0t\ KEY TO THC.STCn. S$UA*U 

BY A.W.W00D3, 
47W# IN* PLAIN rtti/ffJ TM LPKTH 

if urn, fries, W, *mc£t. et/r* an§ 

BCVCLi rtf £¥£N A fit UNtVCH 
m*Wf Cirt4> OQA/ffi MCASUffE £19 f 
6ent post PAID. PRICt Si. 00 



THE CARPENTER. ph^mS^-vV 



(S.A.WOODS MACHINE CO., South Boston, Mass. 



flARTEN DOSCHER 

MANUFACTURER SAUQATUCK, CONN, 

Carpenters- Bench and Moulding 



PLANES 



Hand Made. 



handles, 

MALLETS, &c. 



VOW* MAHBW**M M4LI* rom 

DOSCHER'S PLANES 



We Hake 'em, Yon Want 'en 

If you are a carpenter, 
a contractor, a lumber 
dealer, a real estate 
agent, or if you are 
going to build a house, 
send 5 cents for Hicks' 
Illustrated Catalogue 
of artistic designs. . . 

IO UTf^lTQ 37 Station A 

• n*v»'N» Omaha, Km. 



, Who. Is 
kf| /Your Work? 



If yiiu are (llaaaliifl.il 
tli ri*.r situation. ,<»urs.l- 
• rjr, yi.ur 1 ham,.. ..( , ..inplm 
>uci fun, writ,- l<i Tin- I nl .rum mtial 

Otirr»-p>>ii'l,.iicp Kehuola, Her.nl Pa . 

and k.ru 11 . , w ntlifr. bo situated ,r*< getting 

[An Education by Mail 

k Sttarl*-nf e in tb*> r<>tjr»*n nf M^ K* ll'^r Kit-c* 

^tnrai Knjf ine-i-rinv, A K h ll^to lfjfr» a uf *r*j uf 
tilt* V\%\\ Ktitfntf **rinif CnttffMwl are 
a«j<>ri ^iijiIH\« 'I fiff nilnri'-i Ur*ft~ 
U twitu ptraftkUM. Wrii.11 
f r pAn p kj le tel. 

ftp ItrtifMiBQi. 
L 4»rr*»jin«d*fc«j It, j 

II ui lOtflt 



f 



frim 



TOWER & LYON, 



I ol 



96 Chambers Street, 
NEW YORK. 




The largest »»„ must 
**a>>pl«toll>* of Wood. 
workl«a Ma.blaarj i M 
tke world for Car bea- 
ter, uad J el u era and 
-worker. 



Wood 

Maohlka 0*. 



FINE TOOLS. 

Chaplin's Pat. Planes. 

Corrnrated Face or Smooth Face. 

Rubber Handle* or Enameled 

Wood Handles. 

LEVER ADJUSTMENT. 
TOWERS CHAMPION SCREW DRIVERS, 

Spatial 8W.1. Tatted Toarb Ttmp.r. Solid Taatad Baliter. H.1T7 If all Feral.. Fitted Ewdlr, 




r H. 1 'lament Do., (Ilea Covt- 
Mth. Do. .Ltd.. aoadetl A 
W»»r% Hoyt A Bro Co, 
Tba Lart Houston Ot . 
Lata man Ucb Oo . sill* an 
kee Header M uj Co.. U. B 
Rofara A Co., Rowley A 
Bermanee Co. 
gortaIcA.Oo„ 

Addraaa atareat sale, room and atala ronr r_,. 
anta : I Ot fJbarjyBL K^Tor^ t£a. dual Mt , 
I Bt^. n arc and Baaln 



ALLEN B. RORKE 

Builder oi 

Contractor 



Officat- 



.....PHILADELPHIA. 




Be iare the treee mark CHAMPION it ee each bl.de 



Sworn Circulation of THE CARPENTER 

19,000 COPIES MONTHLY 

Best Advertising Medium for Tool Manufacturers, Wood 
Working Machinery, Hardware, Lumber and Building 
Materials. Alao of Special Advantage to Contractors, 
Architects and Business Men. 




- 

Satisfaction 

Is given all around when the house Is 
trimmed with Sargent's Hardware. The 
Architect is pleased because he speci- 
fied it ; the owner is pleased each time 
he looks at the trimmings because they' 
add so much to the beauty of the home, 
and everybody is pleased with the work- 
ing of Sargent's Easy Spring Locks. 

Sargent & Company, 

Makers of Artitiic Hardware tad Flat 
Hew York ; and New Htm, 




A Monthly Journal for Carpenters, Stair Builders, Machine Wood Workers, Planing Mill Men, and Kindred Interests. 



VOL. XIX.-No. 3. 
Established 1881. 



} 



LADELPHIA, MARCH, 1809. 



{ 



Fifty Cents per Year. 
Single Copies, 5 Cts. 



Removal or Qeneral Office, 



The headquarters of the United 
Brotherhood of Carpenters and Join- 
era will, by April tat, be removed to 
more commodious and much better 
equipped rooms in the Lippincott 
Building, Twelfth and Filbert streets, 
Philadelphia. This change is ren- 
dered necessary because of largely 
increased business in connection with 
the duties of the General Secretary- 
Treasurer, and of the rapid and steady 
accumulation or valuable records and 
data, which have cramped and over- 
crowded the present quarters. The 
Lippincott Building is fire proof and 
the change of quarters became all the 
more necessary to secure the safety 
of the documents and records or the 
organization, That the Order will be 
much benefited by the change is not 
a matter of speculation. 



Meeting of 0. E. B. Next Month, 



G. B. n. will meet in this city, 
April ioth, next. Plana for organizing 
work and to send out speakers should 
be sent this office for consideration of 
the Board. 



Password, blanks, etc.. for current 
quarter have been sent all LocalUnlona 
in good standing this month. If not 
received, notify the G. S.-T. 



A LARGE number of our Locals will 
demand the eight-hour day this 
spring. Trade Is improving quite 
generally in every section except in 
the larger cities and on the Pacific 
coast. Many of our Locals have more 
than doubled their membership the 
past few months. 



British Carpenters and Joiners. 

BV THOMAS REECE, 



According to a paper read before 
one of the sections at the British 
Scientific Association's meeting at 
Bristol last year {a meeting held at 
about the same time as the annual 
Trade Unions Congress), it was 
averred that wages in the group of 
industries known generally as the 
building trades had risen 50 per cent, 
since 1840. • This rate of increase, 
while inferior to that exhibited in the 
cotton trade — where wages have 
doubled — Is superior to the increases 
registered in such other selected 
groups of trade as those of printing, 
iron and wool to choose three fairly 
distinct and representative* branches. 



Organization has been the chiefest 
factor in compelling this great in- 
crease. There are about 220,000 
workers combined in the 138 Unions 
coming under the general designation 
of the " building trader." Of these 
80,000 are in the five carpenters and 
joiners societies. By way of com- 
parison some of the other branches ' 
figures are as follows : Eight Unions 
of bricklayers muster 35,000 mem- 
hers ; nine unions of masons have 
32,000 ; five plasterers' unions have 
about 13,000; twenty-nine painters' 
unions are credited with a total of 
about 20,000 members; four plumb- 
era' unions have 11,000 on their rolls. 
There are about 3,000 platers and 
tilers organized, and most of the re- 
mainder of the building trades total 
Is made up of the membership of a 
number of builders laborers' unions. 
It would thus seem very probable 
that it is to the carpenters and joiners 
societies that the rise in wages has 
been largely due. 

During the year 1898 trade was 
very kind to the section of industries 
of which this paper Is a mouthpiece. 
Whether it is going to continue so 
throughout 1899 is another and a 
doubtful question. There are many 
threatening factors looming ahead, 
and not the least among these is the 
secretive federation that is going on 
among a great number of employers 
of labor. This it Is openly said in 
many responsible quarters is aimed 
at either the gradual annihilation of 
trade unions or else the destruction 
of all the wage-changing and other 
similar functions they may have, so 
that if they continue to exist they 
will only be associations for providing 



sick, superannuated and similar 
friendly insurance benefits. 

It has long been on the books that 
the building trades were to be attacked 
as soon as the amalgamation of mas- 
ters' associations took up a firm posi- 
tion and no doubt the present crisis 
with the plasterers ts a preliminary 
sortie. JuBt at present the Master 
Builders' Association has entrenched 
itself behind an ultimatum and the 
plasterers are threatened with a lock 
out over a very trivial matter. 



However, since the adjourned con- 
vention on federation held by the 
Trade Unions at Manchester in Janu- 
ary, a new force has been introduced 
into the eternal agitatiouB of labor. 
The convention decided to form a 
general federation of all Trade Unions 
and as it is probable that quite 800,000 
workers will be federated under its 
rules, it will give belligerent employ- 
ers pause. I know that Secretary 
Chandler of the Amalgamated Society 
of Carpenters and Joiners is not very 
favorably struck with the idea of a 
general federation but the whole ten- 
dency of the time now is towards 
greater cohesion. Besides plutocracy 
is busy with it— and labor must not 
be left. There Is some hard fighting 
to be done in the immediately ap- 
proaching years. A huge federation 
will undoubtedly act as a pacifying 
factor to a very great extent. That 
would indeed be a foolhardy combine 
of masters which should needlessly 
provoke the retaliation of 800,000 
united workmen, who had, besides 
the moral force of so great a mass, 
something like ten million dollars in 



The lock out in the Scottish furni- 
ture trade Is now happily finished 
with considerable advantages to the 
men. This result might have been 
very different had it not been for the 
prompt and fraternal support of socie- 
ties like those of the carpenters. The 
Amalgamated Union sent $2,500 down. 
This was raised by a levy of six cents 
per member in work at the begin- 
ning of January. 



London house carpenters' and join- 
ers' waires are twenty cents per hour, 
and the fnll week 50 hours. Members 
of the Unions working on ships get 
twenty-one cents per hour and work 
the 48-hour week. At Liverpool, 
house carpenters work 49 # hours ct 
nineteen cents, and ship 



get paid by the pay, $1.75. Theirjweek 
comprises 53 hours. At Manchester 
the hours are 49 A and the rate eigh- 
teen cents. In Devonshire, a typical 
rural district, the hours are 56 # and 
the rate eleven cents. In the Clyde 
district, which may be taken as fairly 
representative of Scotland, house car- 
penters work 51 hours at eighteen 
cents, and ship carpenters 54 at seven- 
teen cents. The lowest Union rate 
of any earned is that of the Longford 
(Ireland) carpenters who work 59^ 
hours at ten and a half cents, Johan- 
nesburg 's sixty cents per hour and an 
eight- hour day seems wonderful be- 
sides some of these records. But it is 
very possible that the Longford car- 
penters make a much better living 
than do their Johannesburg brother 
Unionists. 

There are other pebbles on the beach 
besides high wages, 



Of Labor. 



IV. 



LEGISLATION SECURED OR DEMANDED. 



MORTON A. AI.DRICH, PH. D. 




HE most Important activity 
of the American Federation 
of Labor, except perhaps 
the attainment of closer 
federation among Trade 
Unions, has always been "to secure 
national legislation in the interest of 
the working people." Each convention 
Instructs the president and executive 
council to work for the passage of 
certain laws. The executive council 
then causes bills embodying the de- 
sired legislation to be drafted ; and 
does earnest personal work among 
Congressmen, especially the members 
of the House committee on labor, to 
secure their psssage, An equally 
important part of this w ' has been 
to watch proposed leg) a n and to 
prevent the passage of laws unfavor- 
able to organized labor. An example 
of this negative work was the activity 
of the officers of the Federation in 
helping defeat bills which were intro- 
duced into Congress and several state 
legislatures, ostensibly to prevent 
conspiracies among employers to 
blacklist workmen. Although the 
Federation desires such legislation, It 
opposed these particular bills on the 
ground that they contained provisions 
which would prove injurious to Trade 
Unions, 

The Federation leaves the work of 
securing state labor legislation to Its 



2 



state branches and to the central labor 
Unions. Occasionally, however, it 
renders some slight aid by sending 
one of its officers to testify before a 
committee of the state legislature, or 
by distributing copies of a state law 
which it deems excellent, as a model 
for legislation in other states, The 
Federation has endorsed state laws 
forbidding the ' truck 1 system, and 
making compulsory the more frequent 
payment of wages, laws to secure 
workmen a first lien upon property 
which is the product of their labor, 
laws compelling better sanitary con- 
ditions in dwellings, bake shops, and 
factories, and for the protection of 
women workers and of workmen in 
un healthful trades, and a law to secure 
one day of rest in seven to all workers. 
In regard to the important question 
of the liability of employers for acci- 
dent to tnelr workmen ; the trade 
unions in the United States, as in 
England, have long striven to secure 
a reversal by statute of the common 
law rule by which an employer is not 
liable for injuries suffered by his 
employees through the negligence of 
a fellow workman. The Federation 
favors a statute law giving employees 
the same right to damages for personal 
Injuries which other persons have, and 
has recommended the Massachusetts 
employers* liability law for adoption In 
other states. The Federation also pro- 
poses state laws making it illegal for 
employers to discharge an employee 
because of his connections with any 
labor organization or to require their 
workmen to sign a so-called ' ' iron- clad 
contract," binding themselves not to 
join a Trade Union. 

The national legislation desired by 
the Federation covers a wide range of 
subjects. A few resolutions, while 
less directly affecting the policy of 
Trade Unions, serve to record what a 
large class of workmen think in regard 
to certain questions of the day. In 
political questions the Federation has 
declared itself in favor of the Austra- 
lian ballot, civil .service reform, the 
purification of primary elections, the 
election of United States Senators by 
popular vote, and direct legislation in 
state and municipal governments by 
means of the initiative and referendum. 
Almost every convention has passed 
a resolution in favor of the compulsory 
education of children. The govern- 
ment is also urged to acquire the tele- 
graph and telephone and to establish 
postal savings banks. With the ex- 
ception of these more general reso- 
lutions, however, the Federation has 
confined its attention to laws which 
could be fairly classed as labor legis- 
lation. 

While most of tht laws which the 
Federation advocates affect the wel- 
fare of the entire bod.* of trade union 
workmen, It occasionally endeavors 
to secure special laws for certain 
trades. It endorsed the law passed 
in 1893, to prevent accidents to rail* 
road employees by compelling rail- 
roads to provide their cars with auto- 
matic couplers ; and it endeavors to 
secure laws for the improvement of 
the condition of seamen by requiring 
Improved forecastles, a better scale of 
rations, protection of seamen 's wages, 
freedom of seamen to quit their em- 
ployment when their vessel is in 
Dort and lnsoection of 



of vessels. To aid the states in their 
efforts to suppress the sweating sys- 
tem, the Federation has favored a 
national law to prohibit the transpor- 
tation of goods made in sweat shops, 
It remains to consider the more im- 
portant general legislation which the 
Federation has urged upon Congress. 
In the early years of the Federation, 
each convention demanded laws per- 
mitting the incorporation of trade 
unions " In order that the property 
of the laboring classes may have the 
same protection as the property of 
other classes," Although snch laws 
were passed by Congress and by six 
states, very few trade unions have 
become incorporated, and agitation 
on the part of the Federation for such 
laws has altogether ceased. The 
truth is, that almost all trade unions 
have come to believe that incorpora- 
tion would bring them no advantages 
sufficient to counterbalance the added 
responsibilities, such as the liability 
to be sued as a society, which it would 
Impose. Trade unions also prefer to 
remain unincorporated in order better 
to avoid the control of the courts, 
which they so much distrust. 

A number of laws which have been 
favored by the American Federation 
of Labor, including laws to restrict 
the number of apprentices, to abolish 
the contract system of convict labor, 
and to prohibit the immigration of 
Chinese laborers and of alien laborers 
under contract, and the proposed law 
for the further restriction of immigra- 
tion, may be classed as attempts of 
the workmen to set bounds to what 
seems to them the dangerous com peti- 
tion of "cheap labor." The opposi- 
tion of the Federation to the system 
of letting out national, state, and 
municipal work by contract, on the 
ground that the contractors discrim- 
inate against organized labor in favor 
of Inferior workmen at reduced wages, 
may be placed in the same category. 
Legislation restricting the hours of 
labor of women and children, and for- 
bidding the employment of children 
under fourteen years of age, although 
It is also favored on other grounds, is 
at the same time regarded by the Fed- 
eratlon as another efficient means of 
restricting the competition of cheap 
labor, 

Twenty years ago most American 
trade unionists favored the restric- 
tion of the number of apprentices, and 
the earliest conventions of the Feder- 
ation passed resolutions in favor of 
uniform apprentice laws throughout 
the country. This demand was soon 
discarded as futile in the face of the 
changing conditions of industry due 
primarily to the rapid Introduction of 
machinery. A few trade unions, 
such as the plumbers, steamfitters, 
bricklayers and iron molders, still 
make rules for the regulation of ap- 
prentices ; but most Unions, like the 
carpenters, have given up the old sys- 
tem of Indentured apprentices. 

Every convention of the Federation 
reiterates the protest against the em- 
ployment of convict labor in any way 
which brings It Into serious competi- 
tion with Iree labor. This applies 
especially to the contract system of 
Alabama, Georgia, Kentucky and 
Tennessee, which permits mining cor- 
porations and other private contractors 
to hire convicts, The attitude of the 



more Intelligent element of the Fed- 
eration is stated in the report of a 
special committee on convict labor to 
the 1S97 convention. The committee 
recognized that to preserve the health 
and morals of the convict, and to re- 
form him, he must be employed at 
some productive occupation, but pro- 
posed the following state regulation 
of prison work to prevent the product 
of convict labor from coming into 
competition with the product of free 
workmen. 

"1. Convict labor shall be employed 
in the manufacture of such articles as 
are needed in the state prisons and 
charitable institutions, and also in 
raising farm and garden produce for 
these Institutions. 

"j. All these industries shall be 
carried on by hand labor. 

"3. The convicts shall only work 
eight hours a day,*' 

These regulations were endorsed by 
the convention. The committee also 
commended the system of convict 
labor recently adopted in Pennsyl- 
vania, forbidding the use of labor- 
saving machinery, and providing that 
not more than 5 per cent, of the con- 
victs should be employed at any one 
trade. Most states, however, have 
not yet adopted these restrictive laws. 
In order to prevent the competition of 
prison made goods fron these states, 
the Federation favors a national law 
forbidding the sale of the products of 
convict labor of a state in any other 
state. 

Two classes of immigrants, Chinese 
laborers and alien laborers rho come 
to America under contract, have al- 
ways been opposed by the Federation. 
Since the date when this immigration 
was forbidden by law, trade union- 
ists have used every means in their 
power to se« that the law is strictly 
enforced. On the broader question of 
the further restriction of immigration, 
the opinion of trade unionists repre- 
sented in the Federation has under- 
gone a great change. Until 1897 the 
conventions voted that no further re- 
striction was necessary, but in that 
year, w' en the question was submit- 
ted to a referendum vote of the mem- 
bers of all trade unions affiliated with 
the Federation, 84 per cent, of those 
voting favored " a reasonable measure 
of restriction on the lines of the edu- 
cational test as contained in the Lodge 
bill." The more characteristic argu- 
ments advanced by trade unionists 
for this restriction are that the immi- 
grants, particularly when they are of 
a different race and lower standard of 
living, swell the numbers of the un- 
employed and in other ways render 
the organization of trade unions 
more difficult, and thus keep down 
wages. Nevertheless, a minority In 
the Federation sharply opposes fur- 
ther restriction of immigration. 

A series of resolutions relate to 
labor bureaus and statistics of labor. 
The early conventions urged the 
establishment of the United States 
Department of Labor. After this was 
attained In 1884, the convention 
undertook to promote the establish- 
ment of similar bureaus in the indi- 
vidual states, thirty- three of which 
exist to day. These bureau a are espe- 
cially requested to investigate "the 
influence of labor organizations upon 
the moral and material welfare, both 



of the wage-workers and of the com- 
niunlty as a whole." At present the 
Federation favors the control of the 
United States census by the Depart- 
ment ot Labor; and also wishes the 
head of this Department to have a 
place in the Cabinet. 

( To he continued ) 




(TtU 



r, .nd Idea* a. to Cralt 
*Jr"lf inli ttlon 
Wffta on on* tide ot the paper only. All 



Matter for IhU Dapartmtnt nail be In tbli 
»Hlca by the >«tbo1 tha month.) 



Novel Trim. 



From Trimmer, Brooklyn, N T . V. 

I send a new idea from trim for craft 
problems, which many of the brothers 
will lind very handy. It is the usual 




trim but has the back edge tongued 
to fit into the back band, which is 
grooved and glued to it. When the 
front edge Is nailed to the jamb, a 
smart blow of a hammer on a block 
will drive the sharp edge of the back- 
band into the aoft plaster ami make a 
close insect-proof joint. 

Bracing a Flag Pole In a Corner. 



From McM,, Passaic. 

Will some expert please give the 
framing to stiffen a corner of a flat 
root where the flf>g pole comes up on 
a two-story frame store 

Curved Panel Backs and Shutters. 



From M. A. D., Pittsburg, Pa. 

Will some reader please inform me 
the difference between an isolated pier 
and one which is not so g Also the 
best way to get out panel backs, soffit 

..: E ~ ; 

and shutters for a window with an 
elliptic chase, like chat I j «d in the 
enclosed pencil sketch, which has an 
octagon plan and elevation on the 
outside and an elliptic one on the in- 
side, which, I think, is an unusual 
way to build a brick wall ? 



A Suggestion. 



From Handy, Pawtucket, R.I, 

I read the mechanical part of The 
Carpenter, and find it very useful 
for a journeyman, but, like every- 
thing else, it is no use as a help un- 
less you use the tools. Would it not 
be well to give something new about 
ordinary work which we do every day, 
to lessen the labor, which is hard in 
frame work, such as handling heavy 
stuff, climbing and so on, aU thus 
help out a young fellow? 



THE CARPENTER. 



8 



Sliding Doors. 



From Oscar B. Brooklyn, Cleveland, O, 
I have a pair of sliding doors set on 
a floor track, and can't get them to 
come to a joint or close properly, as 
the floor is settled out of level, about 
% an inch in the 5 foot width of the 
doors. If any one wants to help me 
out write for next Cari-rntek, as I've 
got to overhaul the houBe before the 
first of May. 



Bicycle Tool Box. 



From Q. L. M., Detroit, Mich. 

The spring is coming on, and most 
of us are looking forward to a busy 
year of work and better times, and as 
many of us live in the suburbs of 
cities and ride some distance to work 
on trolleys or wheels, I think some 
models of portable tool chests or 
boxes would be in order, and would 
be glad to see something of this 
sort published. I send a rough sketch 
of a bicycla box to fit inside the 




frame which is very handy. I made 
this box 2'i inches inside, in the 
clear, of ^ inch white pine with oak 
ends hollowed out to fit round the 
tubing of the frame, and strapped to 
the saddle post tube and its weight is 
about 10 pounds loaded with a small 
kit, including a panel saw. I save con- 
siderable car fare with this machine 
and box. The tools ought to be 
wedged in tight with waste or old 
rags to keep them from rattling. I 
would recommend that the bottom be 
made Sat. 




Calculating Areas of Surfaces. 



From S. A. B., Camden, N. J. 

Editor Carpenter — I send two 
surfaces, and would be glad if some 
one up in mensuration would calculate 
their areas for floors for me in the 
simplest way. 




Labor and Politics. 



Kditor Carpenter: No lawB, no 
schemes, can prevent a man whose 
family is hungry from cutting the 
wages of all the rest, the greater the 
number of the unemployed the lower 
the scale of living for those at work. 

We may call the unemployed bad 
names, but that doesn't prevent them 
from making life harder for all the 
workers. We may send them to the 
poorhouse, but the workers have the 
bills to pay. We cannot get rid of 
them, whether we abuse them or give 
them charity makes no difference. 
We are all chained to the unemployed 
and are going down with them. 

This is what the Iron Age means 
when it says : " Prosperity has re- 
turned, but it is prosperity based on 
a permanently lower rate of wages, " 

This is what the unemployed are 
doing for us. What will they do with 
us ? 

It needs no prophet to answer ; read 
history. They will tear down the 
state. Life is good, yes the sweetest 
gift from God to man, but there comes 
a time when life is bitter, when men 
wish they had not been born, when 
men see those they love living de- 
graded lives, cursed with hunger and 
hopeless misery. Tls then Americans 
will grow desperate and impatient; 
'tis then the blood runs hot in their 
veins. They are diflerent from the 
starving natives of India, who quietly 
lie down in the fence corners and die 
like dogs, Americans, whose lives 
then seem of little value to themselves 
will lose regard for the lives of their 
oppressors. This is commonly called 
revolution. It is useless for us to try 
to look on the bright side of the pic- 
ture, the plain facts are before us we 
must face them. It is useless to shut 
our eyes, yet it would be far more 
pleasant if we could. The French 
tried that before the French revolu- 
tion. 

It is useless to cry out against the 
trusts. The trust was the next step 
which had to come. Men fought each 
other in business until their profits 
in the business were reduced to noth- 
ing ; cut their employees' wages hired 
children instead of men, but the end 
was ruin. Now they are combining. 

You cannot by law compel two men 
to fight who want to work in peace ; 
you cannot destroy the trusts by law, 
for the trusts are nothing but a group 
of men who have quit fighting each 
other and have agreed to combine. 

To be sure the trusts are ruining a 
multitude of smaller men ; the de- 
partment stores are knocking down 
smaller merchants like ten pins. But 
they are giving the lesson of the most 
economical way of doing business. 
Merchants, clerks, bookkeepers, small 
manufacturers are quietly joining the 
ranks of the unemployed. 

It is said by an eminent writer, 
"The American people read." I would 
pause to ask the question, What do 
they read f The news of the Associated 
Press— news that men are hired to serve 
up to their readers, to lead them in 
paths that are dark, to hide from them 
the real facts as they are, for they are 
fully aware of the fact that a lie well 
told is more plausible than the truth, 
and serves monopoly far better. 
Yes, they read, and when they are 



bit hard enough they stop to think. 
We have already reached the time 
when the wealth of our land is rapidly 
concentrating In a few hands. 

When the trusts and great combina- 
tions of capital have perfected their 
work, when the mass of our reading 
American people finds that the door 
of advancement Is shut, when small 
dealers and manufacturers begin to 
think, when we all realize that we 
have prosperity, if at all, on a basis of 
a permanently lower scale of wages, 
then the American people will say 
competition is ruinous and combina- 
tion Is wise. 

Socialism is coming, as the natural 
results of economic forces which we 
cannot stop if we wanted to. It is 
coming as men awaken to the fact 
that the receiver of stolen goods can 
never get a good title to them. What 
are you going to do about it ? You 
can make up your minds that as long 
as you vote or belong to any of the 
leading political parties you will never 
hasten the day. Why cannot we learn 
wisdom from our enemies ? 

The Sugar Trust and Standard OH 
Company never tie themselves to any 
political party. In Republican States 
they buy Republican legislators ; in 
Democratic States they buy Demo- 
cratic legislators. 

Why cannot the labor organizations 
take a lesson ? If the labor organiza- 
tions would make one simple change 
their power would become enormous. 

There has been a constant conten- 
tion that labor organizations should 
not go into politics. Suppose you 
change one word only. 

Labor organizations should go into 
politics — go into politics with heart 
and soul, but keep out of all parties 
that are run for party greed and party 
power, and are controlled by the few 
against the many. 

Did you ever see two boys on a 
teeter, who turn the teeter up and 
down, the boy standing in the center 
or middle ? Think for one minute, 
you will plainly see the two dominant 
parties are the boys out on the end of 
the teeter, the national banks and 
great combines the boy in the middle, 
and they make the party bob up that 
will serve them best. 

What the labor organizations should 
do is to put the banks and trusts on 
the ends of the teeter and stand in the 
middle themselves. Then they would 
have the power to turn the teeter down 
and up at will. Laboring men, stand 
in the middle yourselves. Tear off 
the party collar. Your power is 
gigantic if you will abandon all 
parties ; it is not necessary to form 
new parties. The Standard Oil Com- 
pany is no fool. They never start a 
new party, but get what they want 
from the party in power or the party 
it can use. Let organized labor do 
the same. Parnell in the British 
Parliament got what Ireland wanted 
in this way. The Irish members did 
not "care a rap " for one party nor the 
other, but they had forty votes for any 
party that would give them what 
they wanted ; we should do the same. 
So the first practical thing to do is to 
cut loose from all parties. 

The next practical thing it to work 
for direct legislation. 

As things are now we should {ret 
all we can by using the parties, but 



we all know that party pledges are 
not always kept. Once let us get 
direct legislation and the power of 
organized labor cannot be thwarted 
by men who make promises only to 
break them. To see how direct legis 
latlon would put power in your hands, 
think of this : Gov Pingree tried to 
get a bill passed compelling railroads 
to pay taxes as do citizens of the 
state ; no more, no leas. The bill 
was a good one, fair to everyone 
alike; .00,000 voters petitioned the 
legislature to pass the bill. Did it 
pass ? No ! Sixteen men in the 
Senate quietly killed the bill. 

Think of it, as things now exist 
sixteen men have the power to set at 
naught the will of all the voters in 
Michigan, and not only in Michigan 
but any state in the Union. It is 
dangerous for a few men to hold such 
power and defy a nation of the most 
intelligent people on sarth. 

With direct legislation are we not 
able to see what power we have as an 
organized body ; 'tis true the powers 
of wealth and monopolies are against 
us, but let us go to the polls and 
stand as one man and all the money 
powers of the earth can not defeat us. 

If the labor organizations would 
spend money and time and effort in 
getting an amendment to the Con- 
stitution giving ub direct legis- 
lation they would do a great deal 
for Labor. Let labor organizations 
study what they should do to help 
the cause of humanity at large, then 
they will help themselves. 

J. M, FOWLS*. 

Union 437 \ Portsmouth, O. 



Thanks to Louisville, Ky., Typo- 
graphical Union. 

Louisville, Ky., Feb. 12, 1899. 

Kditor Car 1 enter : 

Find enclosed these resolutions, adop- 
ted at the regular meeting of Union 103, 
January 28, 1899. These resolutions to 
be printed in our Carpenter Journal in 
next issue. 

H. Ruby, Rec, Sec. 

Whereas. It has been the sense of 
the Carpenters and Joiners Unions of 
Lou wille, Ky., in meeting assembled, 
that a committee be appointed to draft 
suitable resolutions thanking the Typo- 
graphical Union No. 10, of Louisville, Ky., 
for the interest they took in having none 
but Union carpenters employed on th e 
Courier journal Building. 

We, the Committee, wish to offer the 
following resolutions for your approval . 

Resolved, Thst the thanks of the Car- 
penters and Joiuers Unions of Louisville, 
Ky , be extended to the Typographical 
Union No. 10, of Louisville, Ky , for their 
assistance in having none but Union 
carpenters employed on the Courier 
Journal Building. 

Resolved, That we appreciate the 
spirit of fraternity and the deep interest 
they take in the welfare of organized labor; 

Let it be further 

Resolved, That we extend the thanks 
of the Carpenters and Joiners Union to 
Mr. Crook and Mr, Cristani for volun- 
teering their services in adjusting the 
difference in wages. 

Resolved. That a copy of the resolu- 
tions be transmitted to the Typographical 
Union No. 10, signed by the president 
and secretary. 

Resolved, That these resolutions be 
spread on our journal. 

Committee, 

P. C. DONOVAN, 
H, VOIT.JX., 
H. KoMR. 



4 



THE CARPENTER, 

OFFICIAL JOURNAL OK THE 

United Brotherhood of Carpenters and 
Joiners of America, 



Pubttihrii .ITnn/iiti on thr F ftf'nth of tm h WUUttk, 

AT 

t+* Si. Ninth 91., Plilla., P». 

P J McCi ikk. Kdilor and Publisher. 

Kntered at the Post-Office at Philadelphia. Pa, 
as second-class matter. 

SriiscmPTtoN Prick :- Fifty cents a yt-ar, in 
advance, postpaid. 
Address all letters and money to 

J'. J. MCOCIMt 
Rni ssi, Philadelphia, Pa. 



PHILA., MARCH, l8oo. 



Life's Labor. 



Sit not idly down, my IV other. 

There Is labor to be done ; 
There are forces to be conquered 

Kre the final triumph's won. 

II. 

'Round thy pathway, O my Brother, 
Foea may lurk in wait for thee: 

But with truth and self-reliance 
Thine shall be the victory. 

IIL 

Wrong- may smite thee, O my Brother, 
Lose not heart, truth must prevail j 

And injustice down must tumble, 
E'en though clad In braien mail. 

IV. 

Chasms must be crossed, my Brother, 
Bridge them o'er with faith and leal ; 

Still press onward in the struggle 
For Ihe prize on Fortune's wheel. 



If friends do ill to thee, my Brother, 

Leave the evil at their doors ; 
Their's the guilt, the shame, the scandal. 

Thine the fmtitt Time restores. 

VI. 

Silnot idly down, my Broiher. 

Start your labors now— e'en now , 
Work with patience, perseverance, 

'Till victory's wreath is on your brow. 

T, C. Walsh. 

Union 64, Seu- Yetk City, 



The Construction of Framed Tene- 



BY OWEN B, MAGINNIS. 



HHEKE is no class of con- 
structive carpentry which 
requires more care, skill 
and calculation than the 
houses or edifices in which 
a number of families or persons live, 
work or congregate, as in this class 
strength and safety are the most im- 
portant factors to be considered. 

This is especially the case with 
framed houses which are built to 
accommodate three or more families, 
or as they are commonly called 
" tenements " of three, four or more 
stories in height, usually running 
from 35 to 60 feet to cornice, and as 
these high dimensions necessitate 
doubling and splicing of vertical sup- 
porting posts and other bearing tim- 
bers, special attention must be given 
to the framing so as to ensure abso- 
lute strength and safety. 

To illustrate this I have in this 
article taken, as an example for illus- 
tration, the practical framing of four 
four-story timber tenements, to 
built on a street with a hill or steep 
grade (Fig. 2.) The pitch is 4 feet in 
25 feet or 1 6 feet drop in the whole 
100 foot plot covered by the four 
houses. Each house measures 25 feet 
! by 75 feet deep, and being each 



on a lot ioo-feet deep, it will be seen 
there is a 75- foot yard left in the rear 
which is requisite for light and ventila- 
tion. Fig 1 is a plan of one house 
showing the interior light shafts, 
which in the case of framed tene- 
ments are better laid out square or at 
right angleBas seen in the engraving, 
in order that the cost be reduced as 
low as possible, as obtuse and acute 




/ 



Fig. i.— plan of store flour. 

angular framing is very costly, not 
alone in the labor of the framing, but 
also in the increased cost of the extra 
material. For this reason it is al- 
ways most economical to arrange the 
framing with square joints, as shown 
at Fig. 1. In building the stone 
foundations the first house, No, 1, 
Fig. 2, or that on the bottom, has the 



Pig. 3.— splicing posts. 

house No. 3 has its right party wall 
4 feet higher still, and house No. 4 
has its wall 4 feet still higher, thus 
compensating for the pitch of the 
street, which will be seen by a study 
of Fig. 2, which is an elevation of the 
raised and framed principal timbers 
of the front of the houses. But the 
pitch of the street will aflect the 
framing, and unless the right-hand 
stone foundation wall be built up to 
the level of each house to the right, it 
will be necessary to change the sill 
into a girt or tie, and to mortice and 
tenon this girt into the front, rear and 
intermediate posts to properly sup- 
port the first story floor beams which 
rest on thei 1, as seen in this figure. 
Similarly the front and rear sills must 
be framed on the left-hand end with a 
mortise and tenon, so as to tie the 
whole framed construction together. 
From the above it will be seen that 
much study must be devoted to the 
proper laying out of this style of 
buildings by the carpenter in order 
that the timbers may fit when raised. 

Now as to the height, which is of 
course outside the usual limit of one, 
two and three-story cottages and the 



up the whole height, it will be neces- 
sary to join two or more sticks end to 
end, and to brace them in such a 
manner, that there will be no danger 
of their springing or buckling. l or 
the best form of vertical joint for tl i a 
I would refer the reader to sketch 
shown in Fig. 3. That splice, on the 
left is to my mind the most economi- 
cal and strongest form which can be 
used in this class of work, for the rea- 
son that it consumes only the extra 
length of the joint on the timber, and 
is easily ripped down from the end 
with the saw, and involves no chisel 
work whatever, if done by a careful 
hand. This joint is bolted together, 
and is stronger than that seen on the 
left, which will require more cutting, 
and though it has more bearing sur- 
face, is not as good or cheap as the 
other. 




Fig. 4.— framing w macs. 

So to the proper bracing of long 
posts, for this the reader would be 
wise to follow the simple corner 
method, which isclearly illustrated in 
Fig* 2 and 4, with the tenon omitted 
I am entirely opposed to putti../' 
tenons and mortises on these braces, 




be (T gfc&gg^ * 



side, rear and front walls level so that 
the sills will be level all around. 
House No. 2 has its right-hand foun- 
dation party wall 4 feet higher, and 



Fig. 2.— elevation of angular framing. 



like. Aa the corner and inside party 
and gable wall poets are so high that 
it would not be possible to obtain 
single timbers long enough to make 



and, though the method Isold, It is 
nevertheless bad, became the mortis- 
ing of the girt weakens it and forms 
a receptacle for dry rot and insects 



THE CARPENTER 







General Officers 

OK THK 

United Brotherhood of Carpenters and 
Joiners of America. 

Office of the General Secretary, 
134 N. Ninth St , Philadelphia, Pa, 



r.enera! President -John William*, Utics, 
N. V. 

Genual Secretary-Treasurer — P J, HCQvt*K, 
P. a, BoaNHt, Philadelphia, Pa. 

(.KNKKAL VU't-l' BIMIIBXTS, 

Hirst Vice-President.- W, I> Huber, Wi Wave rly 
at., .'■ .11 It .-is. N. Y. 

second vice-PrMldfiit.-Wtllium Uauer. 2MQ 
W. Polk st , Chicago. 111. 

GKNKKAL HKKl'CTIVK nilABM. 

(All correspondence for the O. V., H must 1* 
mailed to the General Secretary-Treaaurer. ) 

Jamtx M I*nf . Sfltt W. 121th at., New York , N V 
J. K. Miller, JUS Olive at., St. I.ouia, Mu. 

A C. Caltermu:!. 1013 \V. HOlh at.. Sta. P.,Chica B o. 
Fred. C. Watz, 1MB Broad at.. Hartford, Conn. 
W. J. Williams, 170 Mills *t.. Atlanta, Oa, 



when the timbers shrink away from 
each other and open the joint. There- 
fore a simple scarf with a spiked joint 
is the best, and the braces are so easy 
to slip in and nail in place, that the 
frame is held rigid and Immovable, 
and none of the timbers are weakened 
In the framing. 

This form of building may also be 
framed and raised on the balloon sys- 
tem, but if this be done I would 
recommend that at least girts and 
posts be used to carry the floor beams, 
instead of a ribbon which is a weak 
construction, in fact, the frame should 
be half frame and half balloon, so as 
to make the buildings stiff enough to 
withstand wind pressure, the weight 
of snow or any ordinary strain. 

Fig. s Is an elevation of a straight 
gable, and showing the braces, and 
this angular framing should be as far 
as possible introduced when the ab- 
sence of windows permits it. If pos- 
sible, also, these high framed houses 
•bould be sheathed diagonally. Sill 
and girts might also be braced from 
piers and walls for additional strength. 




Moulding*. 

BY A. W. WOODS. 



The Lane Elevator Door Hanger. 

The accompanying cut illustrates a 
new style of hanger which Messrs. 
f^ane Brothers Co., of Poughkeepsie, 
N. Y., are just placing upon the 
market. It is designed especially for 
use on passenger elevator doors. So 
far as we know at present hangers 
for this purpose are usually selected 
from r.ome of the numerous styles of 
parlor or house door hangers which It 
Is claimed are not well suited for this 
use for various reasons. One of the 
most potent causes of trouble is the 
fact that the loose or adjustable parta 
of the hanger wear -b normally, on 
account of the slamming of the doors. 
As will be seen from the illustration, 
the hanger in question has a solid 
steel frame that has no joints or 
loose parts and It is fitted with a ball- 
bearing wheel. Particular attention 
is called to the great amount of use 
to which such hangers are subjected 
and the necessity of thorough dura- 
bility. We present a sectional view 
of the wheel and bearing used in this 
hanger which is the same as that sup- 
plied with the company's ball bearing 
parlor door hanger, and it is claimed 
that the cups, cones and balls are made 
in the best possible manner. The 
track is supported at the ends only, 
thus reducing to a minimum the 
work connected with erection. The 
adjustment is accomplished by : 
of the track. 



'.*-e.e eVtfvcr* 

i\n nn mi t rtt 






ih^\ir n n r-ir n 




/ 


/ V 
,\ / 


/ V 


\ A 


/ \ 

r^SJI 1 I II ■ ■<■ ajaft 


/ N 

-/1<MT II IF 11 I 11 II 1 


f 

k /. 








N THE August num- 
ber of The Carpen- 
ter Mr. M. S asked 
that we give an arti- 
cle on up- to date 
mouldings. We are a little 
late getting started, but go- 
ing on the old saying of 
" better late than never " we 
will, so to speak, come in on 
the eleventh hour and hope 
that we may be able to say 
something that will be help- 
ful to M S. and others. The 
subject is a good one and one 
that would require considerable space 
to do justice to. Nevertheless we 
will try to be brief and to the point, 
but have thought best to divide 
the subject Into two parts. The 
first part we will devote principally 
to the origin of mouldings as handed 
down by the old-time masters. The 
Greeks and Romans laid the founda- 



made in all shops worthy the name of 
planing mill, after patterns adopted 
by the lumber associations and pub- 
lished In book form, and may be had 
of the local lumber dealers. Return- 
ing to the main subject there is no 
such thing as up-to-date moulding, 
that Is of late production and univer- 
sally recognized as such. 

Within the last few years a revival 
of classic architecture has swept over 
the country, and the up to date archi- 
tecture is found to be closely modeled 
along the lines used for enrichments 
by the ancient masters. Thus the old 
saying, " There is nothing new under 
the sun," forcibly presents Itself. 
The accompanying illustration shows 
the classical moulds togethei with 
their names as used in ancient times. 

In Pig. 2 is shown the combina- 
tions of the above principles as applied 
to the common stock mouldings in 
general use. 

In part two we will give illustra- 
tions of the grouping or harmonizing 
of mouldings in cornice work. 




Hon, and they laid it well. To-day 
after centuries of time with all of the 
labor sa^'nj devices, the present 
moulding!, are found to be modeled 
after the forms adopted by them, 
though as a rule not as methodical at 
were they. 

Machine mouldings, generally 
known as stock moulding, are now 



imoM ntniM' 



DaJoa and of the o 
Utol la aitd oa til 



Tkia Label U 
•u*d under 
authority mt Mm 
laternet loaal 

Typt.4ta.paic a 1 
TjpofTBphla. Tha 



Fig. 5.— framing of gahi.es and party walls. 




BETA!!. I'l.IilKI' LABEL. 

Tlil. la a fao-nlmtle of 
the badge worn by all 
members of the Retail 
Clerk*' National Protect- 
ive AmooUuIom of tha 
United State* Hm that 
all a*l earn en and dark* 
wear tbla bad ge, and you 
may be 



6 



Proceedings of General Executive 
Bnard. 



IanCiiY 9th, 18!ffl.— G. K. B. met St I A. M. 
Alt present, with exception of Bro. I". C. Walz : 
unable to attend, owln* to sick ucss. 

Audit of boots and accounts of G, S T. taken 
up, and consumed the entire d Vf. 

Jancakv 10th.— Audit of books resumed, which 
consumed the entire day. 

January 11th.— Audit of books resumed. 

Communication rea l from Ilro, F. C. Wall as 
to his iHnes-;. The Secretary whs instructed to 
express regrets of G. K. H to Bro. Walz. 

Communication, Union 177, Springfield, Mi'i., 
aa to eligibility of William Kllico to member* 
ship in U. B , he huving received disability bene- 
fits, G. S. T. decided Kllico could not be admit- 
ted, as it appears he was again working nt the 
trade ; therefore he obtained his benelit ille- 
gally. Hence it was the duty of the Spring- 
held Union to see he returned the S '<«> paid him. 

C. E. B, concurred In decision of G. S. T. 
Disapproved disability claim, Andrew Watt, 

On. on 340, New York, referred to the G. K H. by 
General Convention, was taken up. The G. Eg, 
B decided the new evidence presented does not 
warrant a reversal or the adverse decision of the 
former G. K. 8. 

Disapproved claim for wife funeral benefits. 
N. Neubert, Union 375, New York. After careful 
consideration, the G. K. B. decided lo sustain the 
G. S.-T. In disapproval of the claim. 

Appeal Union llti against decision ot Chicago 

D. C, in ordering a new trial in the case of F. D. 
L. Austin *,>. Union 410. G. K. B. decide lo sus- 
tain the D. C. 

Appeal Unions ;*«f and :i7.\, New York, against 
New Yurk D. C. in accepting verbal in format! m 
from Union 476, New York, in the matter of 
electing an additional business agent In the Bor- 
ough of the Bronx, The G. K. B. sustains the 
appeal. 

Appeal R, C. Mills, Union 80, Chicago, against 
Chicago D. C Action deferred, and D C. called 
upon to furnish copy or evidence submlUed to 
Trial Board. 

Appeal H. Kruger Union, 875, New York, 
against New York D. C, sustaining action of 
Union :t75 In the case of Ch. Mtihteman. G E. 

B. decide to sustain D. C. 

Appeal Martin Mickelson. Union INl, Chicago, 
against fine of $Si Imposed by Chicago D. C. G. 
B B, decide to sustain action of 1>. C 

January 12th.— Disapproved ilaiui wife's 
luucial benefit, D. S McDonald, ljuiuu 3.;, Bus- 
ton. G. S.-T, instructed to communicate with 
Onion 33 for further information. 

Appeal Uiiloa 47 l. New York, against action of 
New York D. C. compelling them to pay sick 
benefits lo Bro. Geo. Speyer. G. S -T. instructed 
to communicate with Union 173 requesting cer- 
tain information. 

Appeal Union 217, Brooklyn, sgalnst Kings 
C mnty D. C, regarding payment of cei tain ex- 
penses incurred in election of business agents. 
Appeal dismissed. 

Appeal John Mcnbach and others against Chi- 
cago D. C„ in imposing fines on them for work- 
ing for less than scale of wages. G. H B. decides 
to call nn the D, C. for all information bearing 
upon case. 

Appeal Carl Sarb, Kuril Nelael, Henry Schmidt 
and J Boldt, against Chicago D. C, In Imposing 
fines on them for working below scale of wages. 
In the cases of Sarb, Nitsel and Schmidt, the D. 

C. la sustained. The appeal or J, Boldt Is sus- 
tained and action of D. C reverse t. 

Appeal Geo. Price, against Chicago D. C. in 
imposing an excessive fine on him, G, E. B. sua- 
tains the appeal and orders D. C to reduce same 
lo 110. 

C. K. B. received information the D C. of Chi- 
Ihat instructions In Riser case had been 
I with, therefore D. C, Is entitled to col- 
lect Ones from E Anderson, Chts Johnson. C, 
Swsnnon. Chris. Love) lug. Pine* were held in 
abeyance pending compliance with decision. 

January Kith. —Appeal T. Smith, Union Jjop, 
New York, againat aaid Union, for refusing to 
comply with decision rendered by G. K. B. July 
21, UtK, Appeal auataitied and Union !M given 
until Feb. 1st, to comply with said decision. 

Appeal Union WJ, New York, against New v ,, k 

D. C G. S. B. decline* to coustde- appeal until 
Union SOU obeys laws of V. a , complying with 
decision rendered In Smith case. 

Communication from D. C„ Philadelphia, 
requesting presence of representative of G. K. 
B, at meeting held Ih-tt evening. Bros. Lane 
and Cattcrmull instructed to represent G. K B. 

Consideration of papers submitted by G. s.- r. 
relative to claim for disability of R. J. Findlay, 
Union iw, Manchester, N. H. Decision of G 8.- 
T concurred in. 

Appeal C, P. Llnd, Union ttt, Chicago, against 
Chicago D. C, In imposing fine of $>£, and sus- 
pension. Action or D. C. sustained. 

Appeal A, N. Bobblt, againat Chicago D. C, In 
Imposing fine of 125 for violations of trade rules. 
Appeal sustained, action of D. C. reversed. 

Disapproved claim for wife funeral benefit, 
jobo Maua, Union 61, New York. La id i 
til April 



January 14th.— Appeal John decker. bach, 
Union 5. St. Louis, againat St. l.ouis D. C. in im- 
posing fine otbi for violating trade rules Action 
of D. C. sustained. 

Appeal Jss, Korhler, against Chicago I). C. In 
imposing excessive fine. Appeal dismissed. 

Appeal P J. MiCormack and others, against 
Newark U, C. Laid over until appellants comply 
with Constitution, filing copy of appeal with 
D. C. 

Bros. Hue and Caltermull reported on visit to 
D. C of Philadelphis. 

Communication from Union I--'. Germaiitowr , 
reqt r a ting permission lo withdraw from rhila- 
delpbla V C. Request denied. 

Appeal A. K Anderson against Galveston D. 

C. in Imposing fine upon him. D, C sustained. 
Appeal Union $39 against ruling by Galveston 

D. C. imposing fine of fll upon non-members. 
Appeal sustained. Action of 1). C. reversed. 

G. S. T, laid before the G. H H pipers, etc, 
pertaining lo strike ordered by New York I). C. 
against N. Y. city earpentets. Strike pay rolls 
were examined and ordered filed. 

Communicat ion from Jnd Gen. Vice I'res. 
Bauer was read and ordered filed. 

Appeal Union 100 Kansas City against Kansas 
City I) C, in sustaining Union 2 19 in the matter 
of initiating a former member <>r Union MO. 
Laid over to await reply from I>. C. 

Bro. Miller reported on the case of Ex- Union 
4 of St. Louis. Report concurred in by G. H. B. 
and agreement ordered filed. 

January 16,- Communication from Pittsburg 
D. C. preferring charges against Union IbVi, vio- 
lating See. 47 of Constitution. The G. H E. 
hereupon calls on I niori I8S lo comply with the 
prov sions of Sec. 47 within :!0 days. 
Audit of book- resumed. 

Communication from Geo. D. Gatllarr! Presi- 
dent of New York D. C. relative to admission of 
English speaking Frameis into U. B. Referred 
to G. S.-T. to secure further information. 

Communication from r!7 Cripple Creek rela- 
tive to the defense of a member of said Union 
under indictment ior boycott. Referred to G S.- 
T.to secure further information. 

Communication from Newark D. C. asking 
ior appropriation of 1")30 to reimburse depleted 
treasuries. G. E. B, decides it has no authority 
to appropriate money for such purposes. 

G, S.-T, submitted papers relative lo contro- 
versy between New York D C and the Batavia 
and Ne» York Woodworking Company. The 
G. P. also presented full report of investigation 
made by him. G. K. B. decides that D. C. must 
give specific reasons why product of Batavia 
Company should be declared unfair, and the G, 
S.-T. la Instructed to secure a statement on the 
subject rrom the D. C. Puture course will be 
determined by nature of reply. 

January 17.- Audit or books resumed and 
continued during entire day. 

January IX.— In compliance with instructiona 
of Convention G. K. B. proceeded to investigate 
errors reported in books by Committee ou 
Pi nance. Investigation occupied entire day. 

January 1th— Appeal B. PiUgerald against 
Chicago D. C in Imposing fine on him for 
alleged violation of trade rules. Laid over until 
D. C. tiles answer to appeal. 

G. S.-T. laid before G. K B. copy of agree- 
ment foimulaied by Kin^s County D. C , where- 
by United Order of Stair Builders could be ad- 
mitted into U, B. Referred to G. S.-T. to eecure 
more definite information 

Investigation of books resumed 

Appeal John A. Swattz, Union 24, Batavia, 
read and referred to G. p. 

Application Westchester D. C. for permission 
to strike, with financial aid. Laid over unlit 
Ap'll meeting, and G. S.-T, ordered to commu- 
nicate with D. C. urging greater effort to or- 
ganise the trade, 

Report of canvassers of general vote on amend- 
ments to Constitution wss examined - ml found 
correct. G. K. B requests G. S, T. to call atten- 
tion of Unions through Thk Cakpkntvr to 
changea made requiring amended local laws, 
and especially to changes relating to uppeala 
and grievances. 

All documents relating t» appeals, and other 
official communications, must be written in Eng. 
llah. 

TheG. K. B., 0, P. and G, 8.-T. discussed ques- 
tions affecting the interests of the U B. Iti view 
of the defeat of proposition lo create an organiz- 
ing fund, it was the unanimous conclusion of 
Ihose present that something had to be done to 
strengthen and bull up our organisation. The 
G. E. B. decides that the G S.-T. and G. p. shall 
prepare a plan of prosecuting this work, lo be 
embodied in a circular letter to the Unions, 
whereby their co-operation may be secured In 
thla Important work. 

Communication from Union S'fi. Los AngHe* 
also from Richmond Borough D. C, requesting 
financial assistance to organize those localities. 
Referred to G. 8.-T , with discretionary power. 

January iSOTH.-Appeal Ball Committee As so- 
dated Locals New York against Union 63 for re- 
fusing to meet its share of expenses incurred. 
Appeal sustained, and Union tJ3 ordered lo dis- 
charge its obligation. 

Appeal Union 4JH. Chicago, against Chicago 1>, 
C , In the matter of trial of several members 
of Union 434 by D. C. Laid over until D. C. 
could be heard I 



* Communication from J. D Cowper relative to 
Union ICS, Lynn. Mass. Kef erred lo G. P. snd 
G. S.-T. 

Appeal Olaf Carlson, against Chicago D. C, in 
imposing fine on tiitn for violating trade rules. 
Laid over until D C. e.»n be heard from. 

Appeal Cleveland D C. against Uuion I I'J. 
Laid over until U..ion II. 1 files answer. 

Communication Union 1 '.(, requesting French 
translation of Constitution, and that translator 
be chosen in Montreal. Request denied, 

G, K. B, decides the only official and correct 
copy of Constitution is that printed in English. 
Translated copies may be had through General 
Offico, on payment of additional cost of trans- 
lation and printing 

G.S.-T. Informed G.E. H Ihal accommodations 
of office had become insufficient , that more con- 
venient quarters are nee. led. Laid over until 
April meeting. 

investigation of hooks was resumed. G. R. B. 
decided to reler the whole ru.itter to the G. 1', 
and G. S -T. with authority to lake such steps as 
will protect the inlere-ts of U 11. 

G. E. It completed audit ol books and accounts 
of G.S.-T. from which the following summary- 
is drawn, 

GBNKRA1. Pt Nt). 

Ilslance on hand, July 1, 1S1K 9I$7J* -1 

Receipts July. August, September .. l-.*7 ! II) 



Eight- Hour Cities. 



Below is a list of the cities and lowns wl.er, 
carpenters make it a rule lo wuik ouly eight 
hours a day : 



Kxpenaes for same period . . . . . 

Balance on hand, Oct. 1, IS'.'S , , 
Receipts October, November. Dec, 



Expenset for same period . . 
Balance on hand, January 1, lH"-> 



137,011 ..i 
n,i,7.', ..i 

l. i ww 00 
W.tOtfaa 

Jl.MHJ H 

21 M 



I19.4SU .7 



Adjourned to meet Monday, April 10, I mm. 

J. R. Millkr, Sec. U. h. i:. 

Attest : 

P. J. McGuirs.C.S.-t; 



What the United Brotherhood Ma* 



The United Brotherhood of C.irpcnteiS snd 
Joiners of America was founded in Convention 
st Chicago. August 13, KM. At first it had only 
twelve locsl unions snd -.11- members Now, in 
seventeen years, it has grown lo number 42S locf.1 
Unions in 40*1 cities, and has over 46,000 enrolled 
members It is organic d to protect the Carpen- 
ter Trade from the evils ol low prices and botch- 
work ; Us aim is to encourage a higher standard 
of skill and better wages ; to re-establish sn 
Apprentice System, and lo aid and assist the 
members by mutual protection and benevolent 
means; it pays a Wife Puneral Benefit of from 
$25 to *x); a Members Puneral Benefit, fllMI lo 
fJUI. and a Disability Bens lit, $|(X) to 1-UJO. In 
these General Benefits |S.>,0l!u have been ex- 
pended the past two years, and f,'j£i,70oslnce the 
year 180, while S»M3 1144 mole were spent in that 
period for Sick Benefite by the local Unions. 
Thiais fully One and a (juarter Millionaof Dol- 
Urs expended for benevolent and charitable pur- 
poses. Such an organization is worth tne atten- 
tion of every Catpeuter. The Brotherhood Is 
slso a Protective Trade Union as well aa a 
Benevolent Society. It has raised the wages in 
hundreds of cities, and placed fully Five and a 
Half Million Dollars more wages annually in 
the pockets of the Carpenters in those cities. It 
reduced the hours of labor to H hours a day In 
106 cities, and hours a day in four hur- 
died and twenty-six cities, not lo speak of 
many cities whL-h have eatahtiahed the H and U 
hourrystem on Saturdays, By thia means 
r> \M more men have gained employment. 
This is the result of thorough organiza- 
tion. And yet very few strikes have occurred, 
•nd very little money has been spent on strikes 
by this society It Is not a secret oath-bound 
organisation. All competent Carpenters are 
eligible to Join, and this card Is an Invitation lo 
you as an Intelligent mechanic to send in your 
application for membership In the Carpenters 
Union ii. your city. It is a branch of the 
Brotherhood, its dues sre sn< *1 In comparison 
with tbe benefits, and It /our Interest to 
j"'n thla growing and powerful body. 



CUSTOM T AIM) H»* 




All Trades Unionists are requested to ask for 
ine, labal of the Journeyman Tailor*' Union, nnd 
-Hton having It when Ibey order any clothing 
i a, merchant tailor. It Is to be found 1» th* 
poekat of tbe coat, on the under 
side of th. buckle strap of the vest, and on the 
wat.r'-an.- lining of tb. pavnta. It Is printed In 
hlaek i.,k on whltalin.n, with th* words "Jour- 
neyrnon Tailors' Union of America "In red Ink in 
It naeans a, fair pries for good work. 



Alameda, Oil. 
Aits Lomu. Tex. 
Ashland, \V is. 
Austin, 111. 
Bikrrsiit-ld Cut. 
Bedford fark, N. V. 
Berkeley. Cul. 
llesse mer Cot. 
Brighton Turk HI. 
Brooktvri. N. V. 
Caronoelet. Mo, 
Ohicago, 111. 
Chk.ifjo Heights, 111. 
Cleveland, (I. 
Corona, N. V. 
Cripple Creek. Col. 
Denver, Col, 
Detroit, Mirb. 
East St, l.ouis, 111. 
Kl 1) .ra. Col. 
P.lmhiirst, 111. 
Kliglewood. 111. 
Eureka, Cal. 
Ev.iustou, HI. 
Flushing, N. Y. 
Fremont, Col. 
Pn siio, Cal 
Galveston, Tex 
Gilette. t ol 
Gr.uid Crossing, 111. 
Haugh ville. Ind. 
ILoifird, Cal. 
HigHland I'ark, III. 
Hitchcock, Tex. 
Hvde 1 ark. HI. 
Independence, Col. 
Indianapolis, hid. 
Irvt igtoii, N J. 
Kansas City Mo. 
Kensington, III. 
Kingshrulge, N. Y. 
f,a Junta, Col. 
Lake Poresl, 111. 
Le idviile. Col, 

l^jiig Island CUV, N. 
I^js Angeles, Cal. 
Lvun. Mass 
Mavwoo-I, 111. 
Memphis, Tenri. 
Milwaukee, Wis. 
Mo Ireland, 111. 
Ml. Vernon. N. Y. 
mi Vernon, Ind, 



Murphyshoto, III. 
Newark, N J. 
New Krighboi N. y 
Newtown, N V. 
New York. N. Y. 
(la kin ml. Cal 
oik Park. 111. 
Omaha. Neb. 
Orange. N. J. 

Ouray, Col 
Pasaileiia. Cal. 
Port Richmond, N v 
Pueblo, Col 
RHUd-lnirg .Cal, 
Rochester, N. Y. 
Rogers Park. Ill, 
fiacramento, Cat, 

San Lake. I tah. 
Sun Antonio. Tex. 
han Francisco. Cal. 
San Luis Otusj-o, Cal 
San Jose, Cal. 
hau K .f Cal 
Santa llarbaiu, Cal. 
Seattle, Wash 
Sheboygan wis. 
South Chicago. III. 
tsonth Denver, Col. 
South Evanston . 111. 
South Hnglewood. 111. 
Sour fi Omaha Neb, 
Spokane, Wash. 
Springfield III. 
St. Louis, Mo. 
Stspleton, N V. 
Stockton, Cal. 
Swamps, oil Mass. 

Syracuse, n Y. 

Texas City. Tex. 
Town of Lake. III. 
Tremor] I. N Y. 
Uniouport, N Y. 
Vai. Nest N. Y. 
Venice. 111. 
Victor. Col. 
Waco, Tex. 
Wellington, D. C. 
Westchester. N Y. 
Whatcom. Wash. 
WilHamsbridge. N. V. 
Woodlswn, N. Y. 
Yonkers. N. Y. 



Total 10,7 cities. 

Rules Regarding Apprcntkcs . 



At the Uetrolt Convention of the United Broth 
erhord of Carpenters snd Joiners ot America 
hel<; august «- 1 1, pwt, the following rules in rels 
;ion to apprentices were . ^proved, and the Loea. 
Unions are urged to secure their enforcement 

fVhertai, The rapid influx of unskilled and in 
competent men in the carpenter trade has had 
of late years, a very depressing and injuriotu 
effect upon the mechanics in the business, ant 
has a tendency to degrade tne standard of skll 
and to give no encouragement lo young men to 
become apprentlcea and to master the tradi 
thoroughly ; therefore, in the best Interests el 
tbe crsft, we declare ourselves In fsvor or the tot 
rules : 



Suction 1, The indtnturing of spprentices It 
the best means calculated to give that efficient) 
which It la desirable a carpenter should possrsi 
snd also to give the necessary guarantee to thr 
employers that some return will he made to then 
for a proper effort to turn on I competent work- 
men ; therefore, we direct that all Local Unionl 
under our jurisdiction shall use every possible 
means, wherever practical, to introduce the sy» 
tern of Indenturing apprentices. 

Skc. 2, Any boy or person heresfter engsgiai 
himself to lesrn the trsde ol carpentry, shall be 
required to serve a regular apprenticeship «l 
four consecutive years, snd shall not be consid- 
ered a Journeyman unless he has complied wits 
this rule, and Is twenty-one years of age at Ih( 
completion of his apprenticeship. 

Sue. 3, All boys entering the carpenter trull 
with the Intention of learning tbe business tbal 
be held by agreement . Indenture or written Cos 
trsct for s term of four | 



SRC. 4. When s boy ahall hsve contracted wtlb 
sn employer to serve a certain term of years, hi 
shall, on no pretense whatever, leave aald em- 
ployer „nd contract with another, without the 
full snd free consent of ssld first employer, 
unless there is Just cause or that such change ii 
made In consequence of the death or relinquish- 
ment of business by the first employer ; any sp 
prentice so leaving ahall not be permitted U 
work under the jurisdiction of any Local Unios 
In our Brotherhood , but shnll be required to re 
turn to his employer and serve out bis appren- 



Sbc. 6. It is enjoined upon each Local Unios 
to make regulations limiting the number of ap- 
prentices to be empl ■ 'ed in each shop or mill to 
one for such number of journeymen as mi! 
seem to them just; and all Unions are recom- 
mended to admit to membership spprentices Is 
the last year of their apprenticeship, to the end 
that, upon tbe expiration or their terms of ap- 
prenticeship they may become acquainted wits 
tbe workings of tbe Union, and be better fitted 
to appreciate its prh-' leges and obligations upon 
assuming full membership. 



THE CARPENTER. 



fltafTtnerfrimtnifft. 



i 



rrenntntp feinet RlafMageifi fflt 
ben atrbeiter ber SBe fltoetfer, bet 
i$m bie»a$rt bejeidjnet, auf bet 
et feinnt SSormnrfcG %u betoirfen 
bat unb if)m aua> bie Ulitle I an 
bio $>anb flieM, ben enbsultigen 3Bea fetntr 
Befttebungen 6etb*ijufilf)ren. 

9tut ber Naffer) betuufite Htbeitet ift in oDen 
BtBenSIaaen juDettofflo, roetterfeft unb 
thttmetprobt. 3)et Jtantpf ift fein element, 
flcbntnal untetleaen, ift ieinScufbunaebeuflt, 
Hftet er field son fleuem bem @tf«Cf mutbio 
We Stirn. X)et f lafTenbentufjte Sttbeiter roeif}, 
baft auo> eine ertittene 'Jiitberlaae f*tne $o« 
Jttion auf bie Dauet nid,t sU f^ioadjen »et* 
er miii, bag fie tm ©eaentb^eil ben 
ftofj fliebt, neueBiafte b,eransusiel>cn t bie 
JttfeiDen mobil ju madden, bie Sernfteb,enben 
(Wfjuttttteln, bie ^nbtfferenten bet Drgani. 
f«*ion t(U|uffib«n- 

$er Abetter, einma! jut (Srlemunip feinet 
flaffenlage aerommen, ift aeflen alte Eim 
flflfteruna,en obet aiebeSeiraetbunflen ebenfo 
ewrfitiblid), alt i&n £tal}unp,eri ober gat 
Sta^iJ-T'.rnotn fait I off en. 5Cer tlafferite* 
wm'ue Stbeitet ift fret von jebet felbftifd>en, 
tiflennU^iflen, nut ber pet (orttiejeti Sott^eil 
•afttnetjmenben Meaunfl. 35et Ilaftenberoufjte 
Stbeitet lennt nur einen SBeq fein peifbnlid)e< 
gnteteffe gu roatjten ; am 81nfonp, biefe« 
Beart fteljt bet ffieaweifet, bet bie 3ri1*ufl 
tefigt : ..Siner flit 2lUe. unb K&e fQr tSinen." 

Bei riaffenbtmufiten SStbeitem p/bt baft 
gKfBnli$< 3ntettffe in bem ^nteteffe bet 
Waemeirfteit auf, fflQt mit biefem innig ju» 
ftmmen. (Sine SBioiicung bet petfanlid)en 
3ntereffen ift bei ((affenbewu&ten Ktbeitern 
(leicbbebeutenb mit ber SBabrung ber 3n« 
fcteflen ber KDgemetnbett. Xie gletd)e 3?otb> 
bge fabrt bie SU&eitei yam Alaffenbemuftt' 
, fein, bte flleirje DofenmHiflfeit, bet bittbet* 
i tttfte Beiflanb, bet Qleicbe fflenufe eningenbet 
Sottljeile ftnb ber Hue Pup biefeS Jllaffen&e* 
vufjtfeinS. 

Seibet bat bie gCeia>e ^iot^lage, toeld^e 
tyren oerberblidjen Sinflufe auf ben flefarmn* 
1 ten Krbeiletftanb ausr.M, nod} mdjt eetmod)t, 
tUt 3ltbeitet jum Jfad)Denf>n ani.utea.en unb 
, bie Haffenbereupten Ktbeiter etiieben. %\ti 
lommt baber, bag (9 aetabe md)t fo Ui<t>t ift, 
bie @tunbutfaa)e ber StotQCaae bei ttrbetter* 
ftanbet — bie !apiia(ifttfd>en ,3tobu'tion in 
•Hen $Qafen gu burd)fd)auen. SBitb auf bit 
■oa> nid>t gut Srlenntnig atlanaten Xtbeiter, 
•uf bte 3roeiftet unb ungtdubtflen 1'bomafe, 
ntcfjt bei jebet OeleaenQett etngetpttri, fo 
lleiben bieftlben in bem fibtoet gu ubetmin* 
benben 5rataIiBm«« befangen, bet bem aufge< 
1 Batten Krbeiter gu beffen Serbrufj immer 
»ie ber mit ben SDorten entaeaen tritt : 3a, 
9ted)t baft Du ja, abet ertet4en ntrft 2iu 
bot^ ntd)t« ; ober, id) tin |d)on gu alt gemot* 
ben, lafjt bie Sefttebungen ben ^ungetett ju> 
iMnmen, id) barf mtr meine atbeitflfteHe aul 
9amtlienradftd)ten i.icbt gefSbrben. Z)tefe 
$tteiflei unb SBibetfttebenben ftnb unter 
tttnftartben nod) feftete etti^en br« lint en 
ittGmertbums* a (8 bie oiJUig 3nbiffetenten, 
Me nbtlig llnmifTenben. Xie etfttten «• 
magen immer etft POtftd)ttg aOe (Snentualt* 
t&ten ab, <be fie tb^re Sntfd>eibung treffen. 
©ie ftnb bie ©ittjetE)fitafom miff are, bie etft 
(lf>en roollen, tsie bet $afe Lauft, benen etft 
bte 6t4et$ett bei (Stfotgefi garantirt unb 
wit fcftnben greifbat etfdjtinen mug, ebe fie 
fld> mit ibren llrbe i!9(oHegen folibattfd) et* 
lldren. &i ftnb bie SSeil^eitortSmer, bie 
Venn burtb if)re etgene groetfel^afte tialttmp 
bie Hotblige ber Sltbeiter eine immet net* 
groeifeltere mitb, unS baft momentane 9(uf* 
lliumen gf gen biefelbe, eingelne RoUegen ber 
Itutalen Ueinigung burd) bie $ungetpeitf4e 
flberantroottet, mit bem tymtt an bet Wafe 
beionen, „3a, bo-> fonnte id) eud) norauS> 
fagen, bag ei fo lorrrmen roQtbe." ©ie rooBen 
efl mit bem Unternebmer ntd)t oetberben, fid) 
«6tr aud) ntd)t gang von ben Rotteg ti 
Ifoltren. 

Dies 64»anren, btefe i>p[DIjeit gereidjt 
•bet ben (taftenberougten unb unter bem Sim 
pug bet Jttaffenberau&tfein* Mnbelnben It* 
leitern meitenl crttfier turn ^iatbtb'iL alS 



baft Berljalten ber ooHtg ^nbifferenten. Die 
fie|teten finb enttoebet ber KufflSrung ju< 
gjinglid), ober abet aud) roetben biefelben bei 
vorfommenben Sftionen in bie ?leroegurtg 
btneingegogen, ber fte ftd) bann mit ibtem 
Denfen unb tfftftlen b;tngeben. SBtel lommt 
ti barauf an, bag Slrbeiter, bie ben etften 
Hnftofi gum 5lad)benfen iiber i^te Hostage 
empfangen ^abtn, in nerftanbiget fSf ife an 
bte £anb gegangen toitb, bamit fid) biefelben 
baflfliafi rotttbjd) aftlidjerflenntnifte aneignen, 
baft fte felbftftanbifi in ber Sage ftnb, gegen< 
tbeilige SReinungen toibetlegen ju timnen. 
9cid)t« mad)t ben Stbeiter fattelbafter, al« 
menn er bal, roai er tnftinftin fur red)t unb 
roidjtig bait, aud) eifolgreid) gegen Slngtiffe 
gu oertb.eittgen mag. Die RlafTenerfenntnig 
bei KrbeitetS bat gur $orau«fetung, bag et 
ftd) flat madjt, bag bte Sntereffen oon Jlapi* 
tal unb »rbeit unter ber Borbebingung ber 
fapttaltfttfden Srobuftton niemali bte 
gletd)en ftnb, nid)tl mit etnanbet gemein 
baben, fonbetn fta) fd)arf »on einanber fdjei« 
ben, feir-blid) einanber gegenftber fte&en. 
IBarum ftnb bie ^nteteffen oon Rapital unb 
Slrbeit ftd) ntd)t erganjenbe, fid) nid)t einan* 
bet bebingenbe ? 

Sebaupten ja bod) bie fogenannten $an 
monteapoftel bas (Segentfjeil oon bem, mat 
biet al* bie Botauifebung bet Jtlaflenen 
fenntnig bingefteUt rotrb ! Die ^ntereffen 
oon Jtapttal unb rtrbeit fteben fid) urn bel> 
rot lien fein b lid) einanber gegentiber, toeil bet 
Hroetf bet rapitaliftifd)en Isrobuftion ntdjt in 
ooDffmmenften, ^ebermann Ieid)t unb auS« 
fommlid) guganglid)ften @uteretgeugung be* 
fte&t, fonbetn roeil ber 3roe(f bet fapitalifti* 
fdjen Btobuftton batin befte§t, fiir bai Jtapi< 
tal ben gtbgtmoglid)ften profit berauSgu* 
fd)(agen. 81* bie fapiia(tfttfd)e $tobuftion 
in bem ^nbuftriatilmui ibten (Stngug fjtelt, 
fud)ten bte 2obbube(et beffetben, bem Solfe 
ben ©egen beftelben babutd) begreiflid) gu 
mad)en, bag fte oetlftnbelen, ei bredje nun* 
meb^r eine neue 8eta ber Setttlgung aUet 
Brobufte an, bie manntglid) geflaite, meE)t 
SebHtfntfTe mit bem feitfjer oetbtenten iiobn 
gu befnebigen. Stir bie etfte ^ertobe bei 
3nbuftrialiimui traf biefe Be^auptung aud) 
gu. Die Srbeiter fanben gem unb toiUtge 
8ufnaf/me bei gutem Serbienft. Dod) ber 
XSabn roar furg unb bie Meue long. Die 
planlofe fapitaliftifd)e ^robuftioe entfeffelte 
einen roilben Jlonfurrenglampf, ber ben 
ftapitaltimut nbtbigte, nad) SHittel gu 
fud)en, bie Btobultionifofu.. ^erabgufe|en, 
urn biUtgeteSetfaufiofferten tuf bemSiaaten* 
mattt ntad)en gu (bnnen. Die toettgefjenbfte 
einfiibrurtg ber Zbeilatbeit, begftnfttgt butd) 
eine ftettg fid) oerooOfommnenbe Dedjnif, toar 
bie Solge. 

■rbeitiloftgfeit unb ftnfenbe £ob;ne per* 
breiteten berart ©d)rerlen, bag bie «u:beut< 
ung ber fienStb^igten Krbeitifrafte oon bem 
Ra vital in 6 Ungemeffene auigebefint netben 
fonnte. SQeber ®efunbb>it nod) Sebenibauer 
bei 8r better* braud)te gefdjont gu roerben. 
©tnb bie Jtrafte bei (Sinen erfd)opft, gebn 
8nbere fte^en bereit bie ©telle urn nod) ge< 
fdjm diet ten fin Em eingunefjmen. Dem Srbei* 
ter ttat jefet mit etfd)tedenbcr DeutUd)feit 
bie £6attad)e not Vugen, bag aud) ttjte 
«rbeitifraft etn Xtjcil ber ^robufttonlfoften 
fei, bie ben gleidjen ©ajtoanfungen bei 
$reifei unterrootfcn oaten, roie bte Rob* 
matetialien, bie fte unter ifjren ^Knben per* 
arbeiteten. 8n itjrem eigenen Setbe mugtcn 
bte 8tbeitet bie (Srfabtung mad) en, bag itjre 
Xtbeitifraft ben ©temp el bei SBaarenfaraf* 
teti trage, bag fte fiiuflid) feien auf bem 
IPtatfte, nad) bem ©fief bai ben 3Ratftpretl 
regulitt, — nad) Kngebot unb 9tad)ftage. 

Die Ktbeitet mad) ten aber aud) nod) bie 
toeitete unangenelme gntbetfung, bag fatten 
ieglid)e (Einiottfung, Bngebot unb 9lad)ftage 
guregeln, butd) bte (Entrotdelungber f apt tal* 
iftifd)en ^robuftion unb ber *n SEBirfungen, 
unter ben ©ttnben entfd)tounbcn oar, bag 
ib^nen jegtidjeSinioirfung unb SBtibeftimmung 
auf ben Serf auf iptei* ttjter 8rbeitStraft ent* 
go gen fei. Dai oot&anbene, bauernb oor* 
fjanbene gro re Stbeitiangebot fiber bie oon 
bet fapitaliftt!d)en ^robuftton benotbigte 
Aooftabl ber Vrbeiter btnaui, nerletbt bent 



5tapUaIiimui bai futdjtbaee Uebergeroidjt, 
aDe Ceftrebttngen bei »rbetterftanbei feine 
Sage ouf ber fflrunblage ber Bnerfennung 
fetner @leid)beied)tigung gu rerbeffern, nie* 
bergubalten- Dtfi Uebetgeroidjt rotrb ber 
Sapttaltimui fo Iange befifcen unb aud) rutf » 
ftd)tiloi auiflben, fo lange e* nidjt gelingt, 
auf ®runb Kt ootgettagenen 5tlaffenettennt* 
nig bie 3ttbeitermafTen gur Blaffe gu organi* 
ftren. 

£>ierau« ergiebt ftd) bie Zffattgfett ber 
otganifttten 8tbeitet ton felbft. ©ei ibten 
Seftrebungen mflflen fte jebergett bie 8uf* 
fiatung ber 9Raffen ali itjr oorneljmftei 3iel 
ftettad)ten. 9tut bte 3a(jl ber gut Stfermtnig 
ifjret RlaffenSage gelangten 8tbetter, Iftgt 
einen Sd)lug gu, roie roett ber (Eirflug ber 
*tbetter auf bie ©eftattung ber fiflentlidjen 
MertjtioerbdltnifTe retd)t beg. fid) Seltung 
oetfdjaffen lann. 

Die Db>tmad)t gegeniibet bem Rapitalii* 
muS, roogu bet eingelne 8t be iter oeturttjeilt 
ift, gmingt i^n, ftd) nid)t nut etnet fad)geroetf« 
lidjen Organifation angufd)Itegen, fonbern 
aud) auf bem politifd)en SDege fid) gu per* 
einigen, fid) loitrennen oon alien burgerlttben 
Barteien. Sebetgige etn 3ebet, ber, unter 
(P-fenntnig ifjtet Jtlaffenlage feftgefugten 
unb geglieberten 8tbeitermafte ift ei porbe* 
fialten, aUt jt(af|enunterjd)tebe gu befeitigen. 
9tad) biefer Stnfttfjt gilt el gu banbeln. 

$. D,, Witglieb bet 
Sofal Union 375, 



Pebtuary 9th, tWW. 

Whb«pa<5, It has pkixrd Almighty God, the 
Master Builder of the TJnfverae, to reraoye from 
us our Brother RiCBAaD T. ' • ! kv a most 
worthy member of Union No. 133. 

Setotved, That in the death of Brother Ciitlen 
we all recognize the Fact that no man knoweth 
when the grim reaper death will cut ui down, 
and, while lamenting his low, we tender the be- 
reaved fami y our sincere sympathy in their loaa 
of a loving Brother. 

Knotted, That our charter be draped for thirty 
days; also a copy of these resolutions be aent to 
the family, and alto published in our official 
journal, Tbs Carprvtbb.. 

Cbo W, Arnold, j 

A. O. Krknhv, [Committer. 

Edward Elliott- » 




FOR TAX, PINS AND SUPPLIES. 
Dar* ig the month ending January 31, 1399. 

without delay. 




KOVir* Vernon. N. Y. 

Janusry 30. 1899. 

Whkhkas It has pleased the Almighty Ruler 
ol the Universe to call upon this Union and 
remove from our midst our most worthy Brother 
Covbbt, therefore be it 

Rnolved, That we tender our sincere sympathy 
to the bereaved wife and children, in their sor- 
row, and pray God to ease the aching void 
caused by death, and that each of us may 
realise the fact, that, as our Brother was called 
away so suddenly, so may we be called. 

Resolved. That a copy of these resolutions be 
tendered the family, and be published in our 
local papers, a copy be aent to our official paper 
The Carpentkb. for publication and also be 
spread upon the minutes of this Local. 



1-$1 fBJ 00 

•i *i CO 

■A 7 40 

5 3d 

n — a no 

7 SB 00 

8 18 80 

9 11* 80 

10 — 174 80 

U tT 66 

13 57 40 

13 IS 20 

14 2 80 

15 2i so 

:t 35 55 

17 t HO 



1W- 

20- 

31- 

22- 



27- 



JOBNL- Dbvkatjqh, ) Committee. 
A. H. Parkbr. > 



Minnkai-olis, Minn. 

February 4. 1899. 

wn k.kan. It has pleased our Almighty God, 
in Hla infinite wisdom to remove from our midst 
our esteemed Brother Lccirs Judo, and 

Whkrban. the members of Local Union No. 7, 
feel the loas of a faithful membei. and an earn- 
est promoter of Unionism, therefore be it 

Resolved, That we drape our charter for thirty 
daya and that we express our sincere sympathy 
to the bereaved family of our deceased brother 
and be it also 

tifsolvrd, Thataeopyof these resolutions he 
spread on the minutes of this Union that a copy 
be aent to the bereaved widow and also to the 
Cahi'B.vtkk our official Journal for publication. 

TllOS. flRTMAW, v 

H H IN brick so*. \ Committee, 
V. Undiiom. I 



Dbnvkr, Colo. 
February 7, 18(19. 

Wh&rras, It has pleased the Maater Builder 
of the Universe, to remove from our midst our 
late and respected Brother, Francis short, 
therefore be it 

Krioivrd, That L, U. No. 53 U. B. C, & J ol A,, 
mourn the loas of Brother Francis Short, and 
extend its aympatby to the bereaved widow in 
her hour of affliction, and we trust that the 
severity of the blow may be mitigated by the 
remembrance that we will all meet again in 
the celeatial home above. And be It further 

Resolved, That our chatter be draped for thirty 
days, and that these resolutions be spread upon 
the minutes ; a copy presented to the widow j 
and also published in our official organ Tax 



Wm, H. Tav 
Geo. H. Wilson 
. C. RlTCH. 



Committee. 



- 4 Hi 
-34 30 

- It! :4) 
-21 1/0 
-tf.i 80 
-II 00 
-H4 Sfi 
-21 40 
-H5 10 
-it! t>0 
-11 M 

•J» 2H 40 

30 24 80 

31 19 90 

83 30 00 

34 14 75 

35 8 20 

:« — 17 90 

87 4 36 

38 « 'JO 

3!i 8 00 

40 R 20 

42 9 70 

43 99 UO 

9 (JO 

-13 10 
-10 HO 

47 29 40 

48 3 20 

4!) 1^ 00 

60 8 90 

51 4 5 00 

62 M 30 

54 2a 20 

.V> VM 80 

66 11 00 

57 4 80 

68 - -J06 BO 

90 m 40 

<|| 84 42 

13 — 108 30 
94—00 85 
65 18 40 

69 4 80 

97 7 80 

09 U 00 

70 9 50 

71 3 40 

72 19 30 

73^ 84 'JO 

74^ 7 70 

-19 00 
6 80 

77 5 20 

78 18 20 

79 5 80 

SO 17 60 

81 11 00 

82 2 'JO 

84 4 25 

86 8 30 

86 14 00 

9 40 
2 SO 
-18 00 

Bl 68 75 

» 70 
-24 60 
-11 40 

- 31 40 
97 R 70 

: 40 
— 2 20 



Total 



100- -35 60 

101 6 45 

102^ 8 20 

103 10 65 

104 6 L*0 

105 4 60 

106 21 15 

107 - 20 80 

109 47 20 

110 16 50 

111 6 60 



50 2» 
It 90 
00 

116 2 80 

1IH 29 60 

120 6 80 

121 10 75 

12TS 11 85 

123^ 1 00 

124 2 40 

125 44 60 

126 10 501 

128 2 60 

129 12 50 

130^ 10 00 

i3i — 2i a> 

134 9 80 

135 18 80 

136 4 80 

137 7 00 

139^ 14 80 

140 4 00, 

141 26 00 

142 28 19 

143 2 90 

144 5 04 

146 39 10 

147 17 00 

148 25 00 

149 6 20 

1*1 37 80 

152 4 70 

154 8 20| 

155 5 40 

157 2 20 

1,58 2 50 

159 8 20 

160 13 00 

161 3) 30 

164 4 00 

166 4 JO 

166 8 30 



210- 113 

211 49 

212 11 

21S 8 

214 4 

215 16 

2IS • 

217 3 

218 4 

220 4 

2JI 6 

2J2 g 

223 « 

224 28 

225 8 

4 
8 

231 13 

233 7 

235 6 

236 5 

238 11 

»9 13 

241 4 

242 12 

3 
3 

245 10 

248 S 

247 Jl 

249 9 

260 10 

251 

252 16 

259 2 

267 — 111 

258 20 

25» 8 



35 20 

40 394 14 90 

90 400— 2 80 

95 402 8 20 

40 408 4 90 

20 407 3 00 

50 409 4 40 

00 419 41 40 

85 419 —43 40 

80 127 69 90 

00, 428 9 40 



429 19 70 

4'B 20 90 

434 5 80 

437 5 80 

439 26 

440 11 80 

442 3 30 

444 12 60 

UH 8 00 

449 14 20 



29 461 18 00 

15! *58 50 50 

457 54 45 

460 2 20 

492 8 06 

464 31 00 

497 4 «0 

498 24 20 

471 37 90 

473 49 20 

474 4 96 

476 65 

482 IS 30 

483- 32 00 

484 12 00 

490 21 90 

m 25 60 

487 41 80 

507 10 19 

609 67 80 

518 14 86 

615 13 20 



197 20 00 

168 13 60 

KM BO 60 

170 4 65 

171 7 60 

172 15 96 

173 2 80 

174 M HO 

175- 18 12 

179 16 40 

177 38 10 

178 76 

170 18 75 

180 3 00 

181 - 114 80 
-11 40 

.83 15 20 



184- 
185- 



301 41 

804 18 1 

366 3 I 

308— 22" ! 

309 — 190 

81 i > n 

318 4 



00 521 14 40 

" 622 13 30 

6241 51 10 

SSi 7 60 

.547 33 °5 

583— 10 60 

bM 10 20 

687-— 38 10 

678 3 40 

580 3 20 

684 14 80 

M 21 95 

905 9 90 

611— 3 90 

912 3 67 

817 3 00 



8 60 

7 SO| 
2 40| 

8 40| 
4 80 

IBl*— 3!i ao 

7 40 
Ifll « 40 

193 18 95 

194 2 00 



187- 
188- 



196 3 60 i 

197 2 00 I 

198 8 90 ! 

200 82 70 

■*fi 29 65 

208 16 on 

208 2 60 

■15 40 



863 17 70 

« 3 00 

% 

978 10 90 

987 7 90 

892 2 40 

. 993— — 6 95 

201 708 3 80 

704 10 60 

707 11 20 

713 3 90 

l 00 714 7 SO 

1 20 715 45 90 

i 80' 719 <w 

I 40 723— 
7S! 729 — 

749 2 40 

750 14 30 



•7534 66 



8 



THE CARPENTER. 




Akciiis for The Carpenter. 



ALABAMA. 

M). Mobile — D. French, (Ml Charleston It 

M, " (Col.) W. G. Lewis. 751 St. Louii at. 

ARKANSAS. 

248 Favkttevilli--— R. M. Gaut, 
88. Ft. smith — H. G. Reed. 

CALIFORNIA. 

KM. Alameda-C H. Thrane, AT > Johnson ave 
KSL Los Aniiklks— S. Gray, llox 224. 
38. Oakland— Chas J. Jacobs, I7ti7 Grove St. 
235. RivkkSi DB— Chas. Jiatinltoti, Vine and 
Sixth Ms. 

San Francisco— Secretary of Dlst, Council. 
Win. J. K'dd 2-.1l 3.1 st. 
22. N. L. Waudell, llii'.j Mission St., Sta. B. 
Ho. (Latin) I,. Masarie. UW Kriest. 
301. (Ger.) Wm. Jiljr», 40o hllsworth st 
4M Guy Lathrop. Wiim Market St. 
SHI. SanJosk-W. 1 Wilcox. 52,5 W. Julian it. 
3S San Rafahl-J. J. Sheils. Box KM. 

CANADA. 

14, Brantfokr— I. W. Taylor, 158 Terrace Hill, 
83. Halifax. N. B.— Geo, Browne. 12 Willow st. 

15. Hamilton— W. j, Frid. 25 Nelson at. 

134. Montreal— |Fr. J E. Frechette, 231 San- 
gtiinet. 

376 " Allan Ramsay, 15T Quesnel st 
255. R^tPorfack, Ont. Jas. T. Mar'etli, 

38 ST. Catherines— James Hindson, Henrvat. 

tJ Toronto— D. D McNeill, 2S8 Hambnrftave. 
HIT. Vancouver, B. C.-Alfred E Coffin, 1213 
Richard at. 

343. Winnipbo, Man. — R. Bell, T6 Schulta at. 

COLORADO. 

284. Bol'Lder— E. Lindborg. 
014, Colo. Springs- Frank. Sawyer, Elk Hotel, 
Cripplf.Crbek— sec, of D C, P N. McPhee, 
Box 47*. 

547. Cripple Creek— Wilt, Smith. 56,8 K Myers 
55. Iiknvkr — L* B Reeder, 1332 Cahf. uiast. 
244. KL Dora— J. H. Kehm. 
178. ^nRPKNUENCE-T, W, Reid, Mac n, P. O 
Box ft. 

234. Odrav— John Kirby. 

584. Victor— C. E. Palmer. Box 384. 

CONNECTICUT. 

US. Bridgeport— J C. Booth, 770 Norman at, 
127. Derhv— Geo. II. Lamport, 38 Bank st. 

43 HAk tfori) — Al«rx, McKav,57 Woosler it. 

H7 Nkw Britain— A. U Johnson. 114 Franklin. 

79 Nkw KAVIN-Wm. Wilsnn, 508 Chapel St. 
1:13. New London - A G. Reeaev, 1 w. Coit st. 
1*7. Norwich — F S Edmonds. 2!Ki Central ave. 
748 Norwai.K— William A . Kellotra;, Box 391. 
210 Stamford— R. B. McMillin. 176 Pacific st. 
218. Tor r ington — Cr, as Stewart, 47 Forest st. 
2U0. Water urky — Jos. K. Sandiford, 27 N. Vine. 

DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA. 

IB". Washington— J. T. Ken von, 1415 Rhode 
ave,. N, W. 



FLORIDA. 

224, Jacksonville- (Col.) J. A, Sampson, 28 w. 

Union at. 

605. " F. K Houghton, HIT H. church st. 

74. Pensacola-J. A. Lyle.Slttfj W. 
896. Tamka-C. B. Healer, 2407 Tampa st. 

OEORQIA. 

43[). Atlanta-T. H. J. Miller. 10 Tenable st. 
138 Adgcsta-ICoI ) T. P, Lewis, 1309 Philip st. 
240. AnoosTA-W. M. Hare, 1W27 Wat kin* at. 
114. Macon — G. S. Bolton. 52U Elm st. 
261. Vaadosta— S. W, Soaker. 

ILLINOIS. 

*33. Belleville— Henry Steiner, 605 S, Illinois 
htreet 

70. Brighton Park— O. Gratton. 3809 s. 

Albany Ave, 
4i. Champaign-O. F. Miller. 407 Thomas ave 
Chicago- Secretaiy of District Council 
Til oa. Ntale, \XT P.. Wash st., Koom 7, 
L W.G, Schardt, I8WH. Washing! "a at , Room 2, 
10, J. H. Stevens. 0029 Peoria st, 
13. T J. LelUelt. 1T1U Fillmore at. 
21 (French, P. Hmiou, 207 S, Center ave. 
54. (Bohera.) John Dlouhy. 12.'2 W. 21 PI. 
58, William W. Bennelte 1041 Roscoe at. 
181. (Scan.) I.C. Johnson K8H N Washtenaw ave. 
212. iGer.l Hermann Voell, 482 ) Paulina at. 
418. las. Bell, 1310 W. 18th PI. 
4111 (Ger ) John Suckrau, 3253 S, Oakley ave. 
521. (Staiia) Gust. Hansen, 732 N. Rockwell it. 
-■04. Coffeen— Jas. Morgan. 
295, Collinsvillb— Jos. Vujtech, Lock Box 471. 
'-till. Danville— 

168. Kabt at Looia— K. Wendllng, 512 III. ave. 
62. Knui.kwood— A. Wlstrom, HI 50 Aberdeen si. 
300, Galksiu'ro— C J. Johna"ii 879 Wash'n ave, 
141. Can. Crossing- J Murrav.1291) H. 71*1 at. 
174, Iolirt— G U. Kanasrv 305 Richmond li, 
434. Kensington— (Fr.) Ed. La police, 214 W. 
118th at. 

1511. Kkwakkis— Chaa. Wiiiquist, Box 11. 
a50. Lake Forest— Chas. Dean, Box 05. 
•Ml. Moline— John Carlson. 1203 7th ave. 
80. MnRKLAND-Jat. 11. Parnie, 2011 Monroe at. 
Chicago. 

18S. Proria J. H. Rice, 405 Behrends ave. 
11*5. pgau— David George, Box 322. 
m. Quint, v- F. W. Knacher, 033 S. 8th st. 
ISA. Rock Island -Wm Krueger. Jr., 1101 4th. 
190. Sooth Chicago— J. C. Grantham, 8023 Ed- 
wards ave., Sta. S, Chicago. 
16. Springfield— T. M.Blankenship,T24 S.14th 
41ft. ST* BATOR— 

448, Wadkegab— J. Demereat, 719 County at. 

INDIANA. 

352. Anderson— Geo. Woodmauser. 235 W. 11th 
852. Rlwood- W. H. Shaw, 1S50 S. A. at. 

F.VANBVILLB— F, W. Klein, 513 Edgar at. 
Hartford Citv— I. O. Bault. 
In di an a poli —Secretary of Dist. Council, 

D. D. Stoddard, 144 E. WaaMogton at. 
(Ger ) Jqi. Eiaei, 1824 Singleton st. 

tT. Goode, ;!08 W, Maryland st. 
afavktti-H. G, Cole, 21 kt South at. 
Marion— J. M 



l«. 
213. 



ao. 

281. 
215. 



B58 ViNCRNNFK-Levi Taylor, 1205 Perry st. 
aao. WAsaiNOTON-Jas. Kamaey,Jr.,88.R.7th at 



INDIAN TERRITORY. 

.62. Muskogee— J. P. Hosmer. 

IOWA. 

315 BooNK-G L. Milllroy. 

uSi. BOmLINOTOM— 1, I uickmau. (Wis. Central av. 

Kt. DAVKNi'uKr- W. C. Meyers, 432 Urartv si. 

UNI. Dks MoiNKS-r. S. G. liiiilclev, l:«H2lst si. 

878 DUHVOPK-M. R. Hogan. 2!W?ih »t. 

7<i7. UTTiMWA-J.W.Morrison, 11KS. Jtffersonst 

KANSAS. 

: ■ ari.f.ntine— 

138, Kansas Citv- M. E. Holland, ,VW Tautomee 
ave. 

Leavenworth — J no, E. Crcssley. 'Jth ami 
Sherman. 

15H. Tophka - A. M. H. Claud v. 40S Tyler st, 
201, Wicuita-J. L Taylor, . ; >2uS. Osage at. 

KENTUCKY. 

712, Covington— C. Glalting, 15tXi Kavannugh st. 
785. " (Ger.) It. Kunipseti. 202 W. 13th st. 
442, Hopkinsvili.e— W. O Hall. 
ll», Lol'iSViLLE— H. S. Huflman 1737 Gnltagher. 
214. " (Ger.) J. Schneider. 113n K. Jacob av. 
tWS. Newpokt— W. E. Wing, 8^2 Central ave 

LOUISIANA. 

New Orleans— Secretary of nisi. Council 
F. G. Wetter. 2230 Josephine st. 
78. Aug. Limbcrg. 711 Foucherst. 
704. F. Duhrkop. 817 Cadix at, 
7,'ilt. M. Joaqnin, 1:4114 St. Roche ave 
85. SHRKVFPORT- L. Malkus. Box 281. 

MAINE. 

407. Lewiston— C. F. Tinker, Id Turner at.. 
Auburn. 

MARYLAND. 

29. BaltimOrK-W. H. Keenan, 15111 W. Mul- 

berry st, 
44. (Ger.)H B. S 



berry st, 

(Ger.) H B. Schroeder. 230S Canton ave. 



MASSACHUSETTS. 



33. 
218 
223. 

82. 
424, 
12.1. 
400. 
111. 
370. 

m. 

2-21, 
151. 

40:1 

2T5. 
l»3. 

444. 

b7. 



177. 
22-2. 
23. 



Boston- Secretary of Dist. Council. C. M. 
Dempsey, 272 Mtridiau St. 

" C. J. Gallagher, 8 Rand PI., Roxbury. 
E. Boston— C. M. Dempsev,272 Meridian at. 
FALL River — Isian Dion, M2 Suffolk at. 
Haverhill— R. A. Clark. 3u Dudley st. 
Hingham— H. H. Wherily. Box 113. 
Holvoke— F. Marchand, 46 Cabot st. 
HuuaoN— Geo. h. Bryant, Box 125, 
Lawrence— Win, C. Gemmel, 17 Crosby st. 
Lenox— P. H. Cannavan. Box 27. 
Lowkll- Kiank A. Kappler.291 Lincoln st. 
MaRhlkhead— R. H. Roach. 9 Him ct. 
Marlboro— J. O. Di.nohut, 37 School st. 
New Beororo— C.G. Franci*. 218 North St. 
Newton— c I.. Connors, 82 West st. 
North Adams- G, W. Houghton, 1 Ryon's 

Lane, 

Pittseield — Chas Hvde. 16 Booth's Place. 
Roxiii hv— H. M. Taylor, llti Whitfield si., 

DorchMter. 
Springfield— (French) P. Provost, Jr., Box 
48-,, Merrick. 
P. J. Collins, 13o5 State St. 
WKSTFtELn— H. G. Pomeroy, So Chestnut st. 
Worcester- W.A Roasley.oCily View ave. 



X-R. W Floyd, 1818 Sd ave. 



MICHIOAN. 

105. Alpena— B, D. Kelly, 410 Tawas st. 
118. BavCitv— H G. Gates, 218 N. Birney st, 

18, Detroit— T. S. Jordan. 427 Beaufaitave, 
188. Grand Rapids— A. Van Dyke, tu Qui m by at. 
130. Hancock— Louis Verville' Box 116 
173. M i' n i sing — A. L.Johnson. 
100. MosiKEOON- Harlev W. siarke, 11 Marshall 

59. Saginaw— P. Frlacti. 501 Ward st . E. S. 
:tfl. " Jacob Splndler, 1323 Mackinaw st. 

48. SaultSt. Marie— A.StOwell,2h2 Ponaa-eav. 
22fi Traverse Citv- John J. Tisdal-, 3187th »t. 

MINNESOTA. 

381. Dl'LUTR — John Knox, Box '283, W Duluth. 

7. Minneapolis— Henu in g stubee, 2303 E. 22d 
288 Red Lake Falls— N, Holherg. 

87. St. Pacl— Nels fobnsoa, TOT Martin at. 

MISSOURI. 

4. — Kansas Citv— 

110. St. Joseph — Wrn, Zimmerman. 1223 N. 13th 
St. Lotus— secretarv of District Council, 
R. Puelle, 004 Market at. 

5. (Ger.) Wm Lammert. 19'OLnmlsI. 

45. (Ger.) W. WamhofT. 1418 Montgomery st. 
47. (Ger.) A. HofTmann. 2121 Victor st. 
73. Geo. C. Newman. "iiH N . 1.5th St. 

257. J. A. Stelninger. SSftS Lucky st. 

5T3. (Btair Bldrs.) Edw. Hruggemann, 2824 Madl- 
aon st. 

MONTANA. 

88. ANACONDA— C, W Starr, Box 218 

258. Belt— Andrue Eckernon. 

112. Bi'tte Citv— C. F. Nugent, Box flfft, 
2km Great Falls— O. M. Lamherl. Box lr23. 
153 Helena- O. K Horn, Lishelandst 
28. MisaoULA-M. C Pepple. 

NEBRASKA. 

427. Omaha — J. H. Maua, 8 ;t S, 28th st. 
NEW JERSEY. 

T50. Asburv Park— Wm. H. Carr, Box 807 
488, BAVONNE-P. A, Miller, 13 K 53d at 
121, Briugbton— J. H. Reeves, 145 Fayette at 

20. Camden— T. E. Peterson. HU Walnut at 
21 T. H. Orange— L. P. Sherrer, 34 Bedford at 
187. Elizabeth — H Zimmerman 240 south st 
887. " (Ger.) John Kuhn. II Spencer st. 

28o. Hackensack— T. Heath 312 Union st 
391. HonOKKN— A, Crothers, 131 Jackson st. 
487, " (Ger.) H Sievers, 400 Monroe at 

57. IrvinCTon— Chas. Van Wert. 
139 JBH8BV City— Jos G. Hunt, 440 Communi- 
paw ave. 

4*2. " L. F. Ryan, 181 Ninth at. 

584. (J. C. Heights) John Handorf, North st, and 
Boulevard. 

151. Long Branch— Chaa E. Brown, Box 241, 

Long Branch City. 
232, Milhurn— J H. White, Short Hilla. 
305 Mu. i vii i. k -Jas. McN>al. 822 W. Main at 
429 MoNTCLAia-Jas. McLeod, 141 Foiest at. 
838. MorristoWK— C. V. Deata. Lock Box 188 
Newark— Secretary of District Council. W 
— , 41« Plane at 



120. (Ger 



i. Long, 10 Davis at., E. 1 
OPreJ. Tebe.eSHs. 18th 



14S. Herm. Henri, 2S7 Waverly at. 

308. A. I,. Be«gle, 1*0 N 2d at, 
721 (Her.) U, Arendi, 584 Springfield nve. 
3t9, Oranisk- M. Morlcick, IT P«rkni«oii Ter 
32 », PateRSON— P, h.Vaii Houtcn.TUl K. 27th *>l 
411 PassaiC-Gco. A ynimby. 328 MoniKonieiy 
8i. Perth Amhdv-W H. Bath, 33 Lewisst. 
M, pHttLIPsn i R(i- W, S Garrison. 8 Fayette «t. 
IV>. Plai.ni ikli) Wm. H. Ltinger, H4 Wcstrr- 
velt ave., N. Plaintield 

31, Trenton— J J. Rourke. 25 Market st. 

812. Union Pi. i.-((Ut,)J. Worischek , 721 Adam 
St., Hobokcn. 

NEW YORK. 

274. Albanv- L. B. llHrvey. 4!>2 3d St. 

t». " (Ger.) Win. J. Franklin, 4. r « Klk st. 

8 Amstkrham — Lesler C< vt-v, 20 Milton at. 
453. AuiU KN-H. B. Kooii, ll(i Franklin st. 

21. H ata via — F, S, booth 142 llatvesler ave. 
238. BtNOMAMPtOW— F. W. Sicklor, 42 Walnut st. 
Bruoklvn— Secretary of District Council, 
K. t' Moaaein , :;72 I2ih st. 

12, Otto ZeiblR. 1432 De Kalli ave. 

32. (Ger.Cab. Mkrs.) 11 Minister, 371 Palmetto at. 
10 », Kdw. Tobin, fiK Schenck ave.. Sub Sta. 43. 
128. M l. Casey, S> N.'well *t, 

HT. C. }•'. Hrown,27J Howard nve. 

175. W. I*'. Host wick,, SJB Roe hi i ii k »t 

'HI, Chas. D, Monroe. 42 St. Maik's ave. 

2V4. M. Spence, 15 Pulaski st. 

211. (Ger) F Kramer. L1HJ Harraann st, 
:hi. S. K Hllioti, tSMMt Mark'save. 
451 Wm. Carroll. 71*2 Bergen St. 

471 H. ». Tliurber. 318a 15th st. 
m. Jos. Mitchell, 811 53d M 

Bl'kfai ii — Secretary of District Council, 
W, WregKitt, 7s Kdward It. 
0. W, H, Wreugitt. 7s Kdwatd st 
355 (Ger ) J no. Groele, UK Doat St. 
371 E. O. Yokom. !!> P«IKttaoil ave. 
410. J. ll. Myers. B3 l.Hinkinst. 
9 1, Cohoes— A. Van Amain. 22 Georxe st 
<ii0. Cun.EiJK Point— G. A. I'ickel,5th nve anil 
11th st. 

81. Fah Kuckaway— F, Ward, P. O. Box 119 
323 FisHKiLLtiN-HfiiSt.N-W.W.Rt.we, Boa 215. 

714, FLUSH INi.— F. S Field, 154 New Locust s(. 
187. Genkva-G.W. Dadson, 28 Hollenlieck ave. 
22t, i-.leNS Falls— H J. While, PHlaueave 

88 Hhmpsteah— S. B. Chester. Bjx A 
UH. iRVisti ton— Robert Brown, I lasiinga ou- 
Hudson. 

803. Ithaca — H. A. Whiting. 8 Auburn st. 
88. Jamestown— O. D. Smith, 7!»4 K. Second St. 
40. KiNi;sBRii«;E-John t. Forshay, 8W fnion 
ave.. New York City. 
251. Kingston — K, C. Peterson. 2H7 Smith ave 
591. LtTTLK Falls — T. R. Mun^an. 142 W. Mon- 
roe. 

34. Long island Citv- W. Furroau,531 Jamaica 
ave. 

212. Mr. Vernon— A. H. Parker, 273 W. Lincoln 

avenue. 

4!»8, " Jas. Beardsley, 32 N. 8th sve. 

.'101, Ne wm'Rti— John l em..leton. 159 Renwkk. 
42. New Kdchellk— J, v. Gnhan. ;«l Birch st 
"i0T. Nr.WToWN, I„ I — Prttr A. Anderson, Boi 13. 
Corona. N Y. 
New Yobk— Secretarv of Diitrtct Council, 

D. F. Featherslon. 800 \V. 1 43d st 
BRONX-S-cretarv of District Council, A. F. 
Roth. 18'n S .nth Mt Vernon. 
51. J. J. Hewitt .JJI5K I38d»t. Care Keitan. 
.58. (Floor Layers) J. Hefner, 411 Stein way ave., 
L. I. City. 

84. Thos.P. J Cjleman. THHlith ave, , Care Molle. 
200. (Jewish) Jonn Golrtfarb. 84 F. 113th at. 
*W (Ger. Cab. Makers) Simon Kuehl, 224 1st av 
310. D. Vanderbeek. 2V) W. I28ih st. 
375. (Ger.) F. W. Al ueHer. tilio Morris ave. 
382. It. Seymour. 18ti li. B7th. 
457. (Scnn.)O. Wnllin, 24 W HHthst. 
481. (Ger.) Vinient Sa liter, 877 Coiirilan.l ave 
48S Jas. Maeuire, 22X Uelanceval. 
47 1. Wm Trotter, 751 !»th ave. " 
470. Wm. f:. P Schwartz, 2 Brown s 

Asioria, L, I. 
478. J. J. Plae«er. ,'M17,'fd av. 
4H7. (Ger.) Gro. BeithnM, 321 ]-:. I2(h st, 
.50!*. John McGrail. 171 K. 82ud St. 
513. (Ger. J Jno. H. Boris. L57I ave. A. 
707. (Fr Canadianl Geo. Menard, 1 i7 H.THh 

715. Cha«. Camp, 223 W 148ih st. 
7.48, (Ger. Millwrights and Millers) Henrv 1 

357 Li in If n st , Brooklyn 
474. Nvack-R F. Wool, Box 4!t:t. 
101 Onkonta— C W. Bnrnside. 8 Walline ave 
183, Peek ski li,— C. T. Powell, ;(08 Simpson pi. 
77. Portchkstek— Prank Stepiien, 21:1 Madi- 
son Ave, 

203. PorjGHKKRPSIE— J. P Jacobson , Box 32, 
72. Rochester — H. M. Fletcher, 5 Snyder at. 
170. " (Ger.) Frank Schwind, 4 May PI. 

231. " John Buehrle. itU Buchan Park 
146 schenectadv— Henry Bain, 320 Craig- st 
Statkn Island— Secrelarv Hist. Ciuncii, 
J W, Sheehan, 174 Broadway, West New 
Bright L i 

606 Port Rich mond-J. Keenan, 238 jersey at. 

New BriRhton 
run. Staplkton— P. J. Klee Box ."H5 

Syracuse— Secretary of DisMet Council 
li i- Paike, ,517 Ren wick ave, 
15 (Ger ) J. R. Ryan, 125 Gebhardt ave 
28 F., K Batley, 517 B. Geneaee st. 
198. A.J Lsmirande. 250 Gertrude. 
78 Tltov-Davld Kiiijf, Box 85. 
li". 17TK-A-G. W. Griffiths, 240 Dud lev ave. 
.580. WatrrtoWN— W. J. Mullen, 121 A. Main at. 
Westchester Cot ntv— Secretary of D)a- 
tnct Council. Jas. Gajran, 110 tlueenot. 
New Kochelle N. V. 
172. Wrstchbstkr— Prank Vanderpool, Bton- 
dell ave. 

128 Whit its ton e — Geo. Helton, Box B. 

583 Williams Kridgs— John Kd K ley, White 

Plains ave , he< . 1st and 2nd its. 
273 YONKKRS— K. C. Hulse, 47 Maple at. 
726 F. M. Tallmadge. 216 Elm st. 

NORTH CAROUfVA, 

38^. AntE VILLI — G. C, Lumley, 51 Blanton si. 

OHIO. 

84, AKRON- A. H. Bates, 189 N. Howard at 
17. Bellaibe.— G. W. Curtis, 303) ,larrison st 
170 Bridgeport — John D Glenn Box 41 
l|i> Bi'CVRt-s— Wm krui '. • ; Kfn^eiarr st 
24 > CAMiii(ir.<,E-V. C. Feriiuson. H37 K. Stubt n- 
ville ave. 

143. Canton— Chas. A. Rim me I,. 525 N. McKinley 

Cincinnati -Secretary of Lrlrfrict Council , 
J. H Meyer, 23 Merr-r St. 

J' Hjjj' erbecke ' MS8 I,ackb * rT y It, Walnut 
209. (Gf-r.l AuKUSt Weiss, B80 Geat at 
327. (Mill) H. Brlnkworth, 1315 Sprinir at. 
828, A. Berger, 422W Fergus at. * 
867. D. J.Jones, 2228 Kenton si . Station D 
878, Jos. Lang, Box *>1, Carthage. 
892. J. P. LucTiey, 2427 Bloom St. 



it 

3W. 

9m 

All 

81. 
IDI 
3 Hi 
82*1 
li tT 
|s_' 
701 
Hal 
940. 
437. 

Mat 
213 
25. 
hi*. 
171. 
718. 



H. 1,. Lepole, 18 roe ave. 
(Bohem.) V, I'lectiuty. 4rijewrtt st, 
(t)ei I Tlifo. Welhnch 16 Parker are, 
(tier ) Allien Karp. H .3 Clark si. 
CfiLDMHVH A. C. Welch. 1127 MiKhlnnd st 
DAVTOM W. C Smith. 132 S. I. a Belle it 

((Jet.) [us, Wirtli.3ll Clover st. 

K. LivKiuDiii. k M Newell, 
Hamilton w c Musrh 521' lleaton at. 

I. 1M* D. I>; S|ieer. 1 14 K Second st 
Lucklamd Charles M Hertel, Box 182. 
Marirtta- |. w Koreater, 2Wo»tti lane 
Hoanot ft i> win 

Por rsMoi-rii-C. Thoman, llo Campbell 
ave. 

RTKtfflKN VILLI I>. II Pelersuii, 70i; Adams 

Tn 1 in K. S Ujainger, Hedge* at. 

Tul, I no - Murtm Tervvilhiier. I'Hsl 1 Door st 

(Oft.) T. Iloeta, 2:t8 pa l)ii ersl. 
Y01 ncstuwn-W. S. Stoyer, 715 Augusta it 
Zanh.svii.le — Fred. Kappes, Central ave , 
10th Ward. 



ORIKJON. 

SO, Porti anu David I leinlersou , Box MK. 

PENNSYLVANIA. 



211. 

23T. 
135. 

408. 

121. 

•207. 
^l:t. 
122 
181 

tv 

12 1 
2^4 
?HH 

an-*, 
.m 

B82, 



ALL lit, 111: v v Citv — 
J. W. Pitts, 181 Wastnnnon live. 
(Ger.) A. Wei/man t*i Tr.iv Hill road. 
Allentimvn-A M. Morer, IW N 5th s| 
Bkavkr Faiis-A. uurry, Box till. New 

Hri K hton. 

Bethlk si km- I. M. Sw inker 412 llroadwai 
h Bethlenem. 

Mcyuown. OS Wash n pi 
|tlgt>y,310 1 Fitlh st 
Morn , 814 duller st. 
V. Maiim, ItS H Ilnvsl 
B. Kowf, SiHH Cotieord 



Bk uh oru- \t . II, 
Cues i kr - Fher s. 
K asti in — l-'iank 1'. 

G I M MI NT OWN — J. 
(iBRKNSHI'mi- J 



238, 



1 42. 
|1M 

in-, 
■2il2. 
2«1, 
2.54, 
KU. 
150. 
i 14 
5H1. 
IH|. 

37. 
28<< 
7")T 

M. 

in.' 

IM. 



H.mmmivKi.- w. Bohner. 222 Peffei si. 
Ha/lk m N-Chas. Sl"vrr 4ir; W Oak »l 
H'ijkksth.ad- H lwin Kowf fr.. L 111. 1 527 
LaxcasiTRII -Jus, Siniili. 23HCheai4rr«t 
N W > A8Tt.lt— C. C. N •» ri-. ..»2 W. W ash 

lUKIi ill si. 

New KXMtNOTON- C S. Aulenbnch. 
Peck vii le - T. I' SpiitiKeriburg. 
Philahh i'iii \ — Sec DistrU i Council, loh: 

Wataon 2618 Jasrwrst.. Sintion K 
W C. Hal). 1 1..: S. Nineteemh -t. 
(Kensinaton) John Watsu . 26ls J^sprr si 

Station K. 
(Ger ) Joseph Oyen, 814 N Fi.urtli st. 
(Mill) J, DurrinKT. Jr. 1Mb H, HutHlNBdoU 
riTTMrti-Ri.il- Secret .iry ul IMatrict Cm.nci! , 

}. G. Snyder, 112 (Irani st. 
H. G. Schnmaker, 128 Sherman avr., A I leg 
(Ger ) P. Geek. 2138 Tustin st 
(K. Hud) H. Kobertsnr.. 3'.~2 Princeton pi 
G. W, McCnusln-nl. 130 l.smberl ai , K. K, 
W. J. Kichey. 1W0 Carson st, 

(Ger.) Louis ranker )si industry si 
Plvmoi-tii— tl H Hdwsrds, Bin 1046 
SaVhK— Benton House 

SCR ANTON- U. C. Scoit.T'iT I.re C" ,irt 
S. Sc r a nt* in — (Ger ) T. htrattb, rear MB V 
Mam aie. 

Shamokin- II, A I, Smink 510 V Camer. ti 

Siiari.n S II. Crain 

Tavldr -Georae \\icks llnx tH 

wh.kisBakhe Da loet, ITcinderellaat. 

A 11 Avers, f, ■■ penn a: . 
S'ikk-c snydems'i ^ 'I N W-st », 



khODH ISLAND. 

178. Nkwport— P. H Dnwirv Is Ijewin st 
312. Pawticket J. B. Parquet, Roa IMS, Vallev 
Falls 

"4, PHnviiiENCK - P Dolan.fi Lawn si, 
117. WOOTnocmttt J. A, JTaray, si orchard st. 

SOUTH CAROLINA. 

S3 CiiARi,KST<ia-(Cnl ) John Pinckney.17 Hat 



117 



•2.58. 
225. 
152. 
219, 

SM. 



CllI.tMllIA —{Col 

Taylor si. 



A. Thomp»f)n, im K. 



SOUTH DAKOTA. 

Lead Citv-K. M Spink 

TENNESSEE. 

Jackson- D K. Holland, MM 
Ksi.ivii.m-W. W. Ramsey. 310 Fnnshs si 
MkMi ius 1 Col. I H C Kllison. 21 Dupree at 



J I-:. Wri(!hl,-*2 Manassas si. 
TEX AS. 



300. ArsriN-J. B. Webb, .-A5W !Hh .1 
18-). Clesl'rnk-J, C. t.retn, L. Box :«m 
IH8. DalLas-Wiii, Watkins, Box 2!8». 
371. Desjison-W. W. Neiglihour, 1315 W. 
(>andy sve. 
Galveston -Secretarv of District council 
H- '-- Weinberg, 1221 Ave. A 
528. J, E Proctor, 1414 IHIh si 
HI. (Oce.) Charles L, Waller 2118 Ave. M 
114. HorsToo-H Shop, 710 Capitol ave 
53. OR^Niii — C B. Payne. 

480. San ANTUNio-(C,er,j Ana. Rlea, M Plum 
,'.lV «. ' „ A O.Wietael, I3S Centre »(, 
822. Waco— A. F. Wl.lmer, Ulsir Hall. 

UTAH. 

184. Salt La Kb CtTV— F. C. Holder. 1111 y H h 
So. at 

VERMONT. 

2i;::. ST ALRANS-Gro. W. Ilromson, 12 Lower 
Wetdeu at, 

WASHINGTON. 

'31. Skatti f-Pred. Blenkina. Fremont 
U8. Spdk ank J. A. Andirbenr, K. 524 Blaine. 

WEST VIRGINIA. 

236. C t.a s. k s li 1 ■ p f . — J. W. Stealey. 
428. Faikmount-W. K. Hickman. 428 Benoir 



ave. 

3. Whhrlim; 



A. L. Bauer ,1619 J» oh at. 

WISCONSIN. 



.5K8. 
181. 



30. 
71. 
188. 



Grekn Bav-H. Meister, 1128 cherry at. 
Kenosha- H. C Goseline, 730 Park ave 
MlLWAfj-EB— Secretary of District Council 
,^ ch Vt S I . leu '* r ' ™ l Twenty fifth at. 

iSK;' Jol ! n De,( » ,n ins iTih st. 

(Mlllwrs.) W. Trautmaun,122i Vliet al. 
Aug. J. Hat(en, 781 34 rh st. 
(Ger.) H. Meyers, 788 IBlh ave. 
(Ger.) Chas. Rnn(re. I21B Garfield Aye. 
OartKodH -Casper .'l nor 89 Grove at. 

" G Kinjf. 1517 Phlllipa ave. 



WVOMINO. 



267. DlAMONDVILLK. 



t 



THE CARPENTER. 




MORRILL'S PERFECT SAW SETS 

B ench Stops. Car 8eale-8. 

Universal Punches. 

Cutting Nippers 
Charles Morrill, 

35 Warren Street, New York. 




. B. C A J. oT Amerlc* Society G000.1. 
ESTABLIShcD 1866. 

CHAS. SVENDSEN, 



MAMUPACTCKKR OF 





m 
H 

m 



Regalia and Badges. 

Cer mx Society Flag* and Binntfi Manutac 
lured. Over feooo Societies furnished 
with Badge* or Regalia 

No. 10 East Court St., Cincinnati. 

United Hatters of North America 



HAMMACHER 
SCHLEMMEH 

ft 00 BOWERY 
"BUT YOUR 




Reed J ^uerbacher, 

229 BOWERY, 

NEW YORK CITY, 
Demi era tm 

Fine T ools. 

A Complete line of 
everything good 
in Carpenters' 
and Joiners' 
TOOLS. 

Send for our Tool Catalogue. 

LOUIS ERNST & SONS 

129 & 131 East Main St 

ROCHESTER, N. Y. 

ECLIPSE ADJUSTABLE FOLDING SQUARE 




TM. Trade Mark la 



THE FINZER TOBACCOS 



are 



UNION LABEL GOODS 

(Union Label on each box.) 



ONIOF LAHHL. 

rhl. 1. the. Union 
or TBI 

ltalttra of North 



Tien JN ar« buyUf a fur h.t. either soft or 
. m talltbal the Genuine Onion Label It 
(a It If. retailer haslooie label. In U* 
ilon and often to vut one la .hat for 
I do not patronise htm The chance* are that 
Ute I a 1 < la are couuterf.il. 
The genuine Union Label I* perforate J on the 
Ml a. me aa a iKmtflge similar. 
JOHN A, MOP PITT, Pre.,, 
JOHN PUILljrs, Sex y, Orange, N. f. 

*T7 Perk Ave. BrookljO, N. T. 



Every Union Man ihould aid THE NATIONAL TOBACCO 
WORKERS UNION by using one or more of the fol- 
lowing brands: 

OLD HONESTY PLUG 

JOLLY TAR PLUG 

CANTEEN PLUG 

BOOT JACK PLUG 

WILD ROSE SMOKING 

FIVE BROTHERS PIPE SMOKING 

IteTAny dealer will order ANY BRAND you prefer. 



Wm. McNiece $ Soil, 



515 CHERRY ST., 

PHILADELPHIA, PA. 

HANOI' ACTl.'RHRS OP 

and, Panels 
— and Rip £aws, 

FKO-H THE VKKV UESTCAST STEEL. 



H 




Thi» Label la printed in black ink on light blue 
paper, and la paatcd on the cigar-box. Don't aaiz 
it np with the D. & Revenue label on the box/. a 
the latter la nearly of . similar color, See, thai 
ihe cigar Makers Blue Label aopeanon toe.box 
from which you are serve*. It 
a** mat < 
good a. 

First Glass Books. 

CHEAP PHACTIOAL AND USEFUL 



The three Illustration* of the Eclipse 
Adjustable Folding square shown here- 
with, exhibit. the square open, partially 
cloMil or set for angle*, and unit The 
Improvement In making Polding Squares 
consists In securing the abort blade by 
two clamping plates and screws whereby 
they are held rigid while be*ng usrd ss a 
Square. II sl.o form, a locking device 
when the square i. *otd*d, which can 
readily ie seen by the depressed portion 
of the clamping platea which slide In a 
groove provided Tor tbe aame. Whin 
cloMd it can be folded and packed in a 
■mall chest provided for the same, and 
ran be adjusted at right angles ready for 
instant aae when required. It doea away 
with cutting hole, in th- top or side, of 
•mall che.tr. nd Is protect .a from being 
bent or ma'ed when left .landing or 
d to tbe weather. Ftnther infbr- 
1 may be obtained from tbe 
«n, XUCK. 4 



' WiPTW#lr»rvVi HIi RVrAllVVi ffVlfVrS rift ffft r/ftriKi ft\ I ffl 




M|4hHtiNWrfpf ffVi Wh rrV* Ifti WK rfpi rlfti tA h% tJftrfr\ ' 



Warranted the Bcsl in the World 



HAND MADE. 



Modern Cabpehiry Attn BtriLbma. 

Sylvester t; M 

Tun Hoaoil'l OtrtDB an it Kmtikatob'. 

I'Ufl Book. Hodgson %". 10 

Tun Html Havana, no How t< l .n It I 00 
Pbacticai, OjurrpTiT, Hodgson I 00 

Bli l«- fill 11 niso Mini Ka.y. Hodgson . 1 M 
Habd RAiLiae Made Rabv 1 01 

Tna Cabpektbh'. abd Builubu's Com- 

puttb Oomfabiob IN 

Ad area. P. J. Modems, 



TliN To.. I <■ mhrnv* In ll*-ir ant In .-nmblDa, 
liou - in. .. . ur.l1n.4rjr . ,■- u'- . . lulu , 
Try 

Burn " 
T- 



Mortlw lunp. 
tltfilh (.,,.;„, 

Spirit I.- - tni 
l. .i ., < <im|>i» 
1 a.i rl . HiiURti Tor 



STANLEY'S 

Odd jobs. 

NlCPlSL Platcd 
with I'i in. Rule. 

75 Cent«s 



STANLEY 

Rule & Level Co. 

New Britain, Conn. 

BOLD BY ALL 



A Mcchanii* who Itna 
tlii* T.» .1 U< use mi lua 
Kuli', run do all ordi- 
nary JoIih with only a. 
Saw. & HAinm^r, and 
a 1'luDc, in lulUitiou. 




o 

f 




LANE'S BARN UDDR HANDLES 




■' STANDARD. " 



We are the originators aiid largest makers of U-shaped hangers. Get 
the GENUINE LANE HANGER for best satisfaction, 

ALSO LANE PARLOR DOOR HANGERS. 

Goods Sold by all Hardware Dealers. 

Semi for oar Catalogue af Hardware Special*!*.. 

LANE' BROTHERS COMPANY, 

422-54 PROSPECT ST. POUGHKEEPSIE, NEW YORK. 

Norcross Brothers 




160 Fifth Avenue, New York 
Tremont Building, Boston . . 
Worcester, Mass 



1 



FOX'S LOCK MORTISING TOOL. 




Thia lithe Tool that save a one-hall the time in putt Ins In Door Lock.. It'* the curve that 
Am. It. whTto? Because ttO.OGO ear pent era MJ to. For sale by the trade, or aent poll- paid 00 
eta* «f price, 11.00. Write for circular. 



P. L FOX SC CO. SOLE MANUFACTURERS 

BRIDGEPORT. OO/V/V. 



P. C. ECKHARDT 

General Contractor 8( Builder 

693 Ninth Avenue 

Between 47th and 48th Streets 

NEW YORK 















1 


















- 




* 










"TRUE AS A DIE." 

WROUGHT STEEL LOCKS 

OROIDE FINISH 

Strong, Durable, Inexpensive 

For Sale by all Hardware Dealers 

Carpenters will appreciate the fact that the 
measurements of these locks are and Must be 
exact, as true as a die can make them. No 
trouble and vexation in fitt'- $ .... 

f Wrought St*«l Lock, au 



RUSSELL & ERWIN M'F'G CO 



u iu 1 num. 

Get your dealer to buy Ihea. goods-he'll do It for the asking and you'll Lelo the UN ioa; 
cause t T-o'll aend you tape measure, samptea and oell iiieasurement blank, with • 
dainty Ri It edged Russia 1 either pocket memorandum book free. 

HAMILTON CARHARTT & COMPANY, DETROIT, MICHIGAN, 

The firm that Is making UNION MADE 



O 

o 



o 
2 

UJ 

CO 



CO 



2 

fefl 
< 



o 



CO 

o °2 
£Q X 

ANCHOR BRAND 
Adze Eye Nail Hammers. 



LARGEST MANUFACTURERS IN THE WORLD. 

Fayette R. Plumb, Fhila. 







Adjustable and Folding H'dle D. K. 
MANUFACTURED BY 

A. J. Wilkinson & Co. 

180-188 Washington St. 

BOSTON, MASS. 




We will make you to order a penknife 
like cut above, with your picture and 
name thereon, with chamois case, for one 
dollar, or a big two-bladed Carpenter 1 ! 
Knife with German silver cap, blnck 
handle. 75 cents, r>r tortoise shell handle, 
one dollar. Blades warranted to stand 
hard wood coping, 

£ LOCKWOOD 

190 Poplar St, Chelsea, JMa*s. 




W. S. Thomson 

Manufacturer and Dealer in 

WOOD WORKERS' SUPPLIES 

Belting, Belting Hooks, Lacing, Band 
and Circular Saws, Files, Emery Wheela, 
Babbit Metal. Waning Machine Knives, 
Cutters, Etc. 

418 and 420 West 27th St. New York 

All Orders by Mall Promptly Attended To. 





A Monthly Journal for Carpenters, Stair Builders, Machine Wcod Workers, Planing Mill Men, and Kindred Interests. 



VOL, XIX.-IMo. 4, ) 
Established 1881. J 



PHILADELPHIA, MAY, 1899. 



Fifty Cents Per Year. 
Single Copies, 5 Cts. 



Henry Disston & Sons,—" stehTaniT file work*. 

* Philadelphia, pa., u.s. a SAW, TOOL, STEEL AND FILE WORKS, 

SAWS, FILES AND TOOLS FOR. THE MARKETS OF THE WORUX 

No. 12 Hand Saw. 




Our Saws have all the Latest Improvements, and are warranted superior to all others. 

They have no rival in quality, finish, and general utility, and are made from the best steel, ami of superior temper. The grinding, by our New and 
Improved Machinery, in use only by us, makes them the easiest running Saws in the world. They have gained a universal reputation among mechanics, 
ami are sold by till ih.- prominent Wholesale sad Retail Hardware Dealers in America and Europe. The manufactures of this firm have secured the highest 
Premiums at all the World's Great l airs, where they have been exhibited. 

And we Guarantee a Better Article, at the same Price, than any other House In the World. 

ALL OOOD8 1) EARING OUB NAME AHE FULLY WABHiNTKD 



TAINTOR 
POSITIVE 
SAW SET 

Thnntaml > of Mil. to*) 
have baeii ■ » d, and the? 

hlsbl* row. mended by 
ALL » 



If jour Hardware Deal* 
er doe. not handle them, 
don't dike an Inferior set 
necauae mid* Dti My.. 
It'. Jtmt a» food . ' 1 

TAINTOR MFG. CO. 

9 to 15 MURRAY ST. 

NEW YORK. 




FOR SALE BY DEALERS IN BUILDERS HARDWARE 



Reissmann's Rafter and Polygon Gauge 

Made of .1 ply veneer, size n ' x 15" x '* ", highly polished and indestructit))e, 
Willi this gauge any angle or < ut required in the construction of building and roofs 
can be obtained instantly and with minute accuracy. Saves time for the skilled 
merhann and enables the ordinary workman to frame roofs with absolute cer- 
tainty. Price 50 ce nts, poftagt paid, 

F. RBI8&MANN, West Point. N. V. 




PIKE'S LILY WASHITA 




A ItllHU 

coatic 



The Beet DilatrjiiB an Earth 

UiBg.ev«n*trllt*<litoiM. impart* a fine edge. Put up l« two grade*— i »olt medium. 
w-Krlt and hard mectluin fine-aiit. Kach .tone labeled, telling whether bard or aoit, 
.,i<l guaranteed to gl*e ah.olute • lalact The «me .tone made ta gouge 
»lip* and all .pecla) ihape. All leading hardware it SSa W t 

Send for Catalog of Scythe si ones. Of Inane*, Haite Hone*, Kiln) Sharpeners, etc. 

HE PIKE MF0. CO. PIKE STATION, N. H. 



Colon, of Laurst. It year* In butiaaaa, and never had a ttrlkt that's our labor rmcord. 
II your dtaler doo'f Aeap Ktyataaa good*, mod la hla mama. 

CLEVELAND & WH1TEHILL CO., Newburgh, N. Y. 



MOORE'S 

IMPROVED WROUGHT STEEL STORM 
WINDOW FASTENERS 




With these fasteners, storm windows can 
be'adjusted more easily, and held in place 
more securely, than in any other way yet 
invented. 

NO LADDER REQUIRED. 

Fastened from the inside, the only tool 
being a small 



They Stanley Works, *+* 

NEW BRITAIN, CONN. 

79 Chamber* St., N. Yj 



THE CARPENTER. 



HIGH GRADE MACHINERY 




CARPENTERS, BUILDERS, SASH, 
DOOR, BLIND MAKERS, ETC. 

bUnutM on Slnglo MarblnM ar Equipment* 



STANDARD WOOD WORKING MACHINERY 



No. 1 Tijitm W»od WflVKM. 



A raont valuable aaamkliie far Carpenter*, 
Builder*, Saah, Door and Blind Makere, rie., 
aa on It Tun can perform a tar it t v of work 
which would otherwise require the uao of 



Ask far "Waod Warier" Catalogue. 

J. A. Fay & Co., 

— — 514-534 W. Front St., 
CINCINNATI, OHIO. 




OF EVERY DESCRIPTION. 



IflH 



• f > 

With 
MTr yon «■ 1 1 H « T 



(Mb. 



No. 1. I'lasi*, M atthm a*U Man .t.*«. 
1'Uiim, one aide, M Inoliea wide by 6 Ittalu • 
Ihlik. 

Melerieeialncti** wide, 

in I nrelliablo machine flir» 

•tied shop. 



nilttrttld 312 pige Mtalogue free If yea 
Save fwod uie for It 



The Egan Company, 



406-416 W. Pront Street, 

INCINNATI, OHIO, 



FOfiT 4 HAND POWER MACHINERY 

OOMPLETE OUTFITS. 
Carpentcn and Builder* without ateam power 
can <u dress fully compete with the large ahopa 
by ualag our New Labor Saving flat binary. 

Sold ON TRIAL. Iind ton Cataioom A. 

SENECA FALLS MFG. CO. 

a» Water St., Seneca Fall*. N. V. . U. S A. 





No, 128 Outside Moulder 
tto work 7,8,8,10,13 in. wide 



Write lot further Information 
Alao for new catalogue 




19 BY 28 IHCKtS. 




THE SQUARE ROOT 
DELINEATOR 

0f\ KfY TOTHt STEEL SQUA^Cs. 

BY A.W.WOODS, 
GlVCS IN PLAIN FIGUffH TN£ LENGTHS, 

jfUNS, f/sfs, pitch, DW££*. ei/rs and 

BCVCL& rOff CVCN AND UNM* PITCHER 
HOPPCn CUT4, BOAffD M£A$Uf?E CTff^ 

5tNT post paid. P«»ct $1.00 
0* THE CARPENTER. W^^^gj 



S.A.WOODS MACHINE CO., South Boston, Mass. 

flARTEN DOSCHER 

MANUFACTURER SAUGATUCK, CONN. 

CARPENTERS' BENCH AND MOULDING 



We Hake 'em, You Want 'em 

If youjare a carpenter, 
a contractor, a lumber 
dealer, a real estate 
agent, or if you are 
going to build a house, 
send 5 cents for Hicks' 
Illustrated Catalogue 
of artistic designs. , . 



PLANES 




Hand Made. 



I. P. HICKS 



S7 Station A 

OMAita, Ntl 




HANDLES, 

MALLETS. &c. 



DOSCHER'S PLANES 




ol Wood- 



TOWER & LYON, 95 N C Ew n YOR , K 8,r " t 

JI»n«faeturen ot 

FINE TOOLS. 

Chaplin's Pat. Planes. 

Corrugated Face or Smooth 

Rn liber Haadlei or 
Wood Handles. 

LEVER ADJUSTMENT. 
TOWER'S CHAMPION SCREW DRIVERS, 

Bpaalel Bteel. TttUd Tough Tempw. ! Solid Tur.d BoUter. Baerj Hall Fan I a. FUtad H.adL 

B»TW»Rr OF IW1TATMU. 



nia: Ua 



Tha laraaat 

S^"j£sra ALLEN B. RORKE 

Builder *m 

Contractor 

Otiicai— 

PhiUdeiphii Bourw, 

PHILADELPHIA 



Wood- 

ally 

a\n>arloa> Wood Wortlag 
Mi hiaa Oo 

W H. Ltacoanl Ou, (Ilea tttwt 
Wen. Oo.. Ltd., <I.«1*0I A 
Water*, H071 * Bra. do., 
Tha tart fiuualon Oo, 
Ubmtu Hcb Oo , Mllwu 
kaa Bandar Mtg Co.. CL B 
Roger* A tto . Rowiay m 
Harmanoa Oo.. Willlama 
port Mob. Oo., Yoan« Broe. 

00m and atata/aor raqolra. 





Sworn Circulation of THE CARPENTER 

19,000 COPIES MONTHLY 

Best Advertising Medium for Tool Manufacturers, Wood 
Working Machinery, Hardware, Lumber and Building 
Materials Also of Special Advantage to Contractors, 
Architects and Business Men. 




Satisfaction 

Is given all around when the house is 
trimmed with Sargent's Hardware. The 
Architect Is pleased because he speci- 
fied it ; the owner is pleased each time 
he looks at the trimmings because they 
add so much to the beauty of the home, 
and everybody Is pleased with the work- 
ing of Sargent's Easy Spring Locks. 

Sargent & Company, 

Maker* of Artistic Hardware and Fine 
New York ; and New Haven, 



- m i 




A Monthly Journal for Carpenters, Stair Builders, Machine Wood Workers, Planing Mill Men, and Kindred Interests, 



VOL. XIX. -No. 4. 
Established 1881. 



} 



PHILADELPHIA, MAY, 1899. 



{ 



Fifty Cents per Year. 
Single Copies, 5 Cts. 



May. 



IWyl an I pMtl (gjllqat tin o[,al iky 
In wsyw,it.! ait the yuniiu le uti pn ah am! 



And »c .re very K ! . 1— oM l.irtli mil ]- 
Th it H| v ife hri e. 

1 IN'I wlilMlmit in the cupplce all day long. 

The apple btOMBMU drop id r.»y rain 
in y ii er beech tlir nnkou tries hi* 10114 

All !av a« .in 

the ipulf>biQ»aoail .Ifown the rltwted kfb»». 

i >ne tremU "O »nd »ilver all thr tm . : 
Shout CUCkoC te.l Die »vi allows ere they paa*. 

H<jt» ([l.i I H e ate of Miy. 

Am j Hefpn ■ 



To Our Members and Readers. 



< iwing to the vast amount of work 
entailed in moving from the old to the 
new headquarters in the I.lppincott 
building, Twelfth and Filbert streets, 
i'hiladelphia, it was absolutely im- 
possible to make the necessary prep- 
arations for the publication of the 
April number of the official journal, 
and consequently we were reluctantly 
compelled to disappoint our rcadeis 
and contributors. 

We have, however, succeeded in 
bringing order out of chaoa ; all re- 
ports from and documents referring to 
the various locals have been arranged 
and carefully tiled, all property of the 
organization has been transferred to 
its new quarters without injury or 
loss, and the books, records and 
archives are now safely and properly 
preserved In an office and building 
completely fireproof. 

Visiting memberB have expressed 
themselves as being particularly well 
pleased with the change, which was, 
none too soon, deemed necessary and 
imperative. 



Belief and Work. 



You don't believe In strikes, you 
say ? All right. Neither do we. 

You talk long and eloquently about 
their evil eflects. Yea, in many In- 
stances the results are evil. 

Now, suppose you a .v'.tch off on that 
talk for awhile. Change your tune. 
Direct your eloquence along the line 
of proving the benefits of organiza- 
tion, thereby directly building up your 
owr organ izitlon and Indirectly help- 
ing the whole cause of labor unity. 



If a union is weak.it is solely because 
Its members are weak, and many 
otherwise strong men weaken the 
cause by firing off their ammunition 
in the wrong direction. 

The bigger a man is, the less liable 
is he to attack ; the stronger a nation 
is, the less likelihood of war, and the 
more powerful a union becomes the 
less occasion will there be for strikes 
and lockouts. 

If yon " don't believe in strikes,** if 
you see and feel and deprecate the 
evil of them, you are bound as an 
honest man to do all In your power to 
prevent them, and the only way you 
can do this is to make your union 
strong. It cannot be too strong. 

You, mortal, must waken before 
you work, and work before you jour- 
ney, and a toilsome, weary march 
lies before you in your travel to the 
shade of tlu trees. This, too, impatient 
soul : your journey cannot be made 
alone. Your brother must be wakened, 
and with you work and walk and 
bear the burden and heat of the day. 



Eight- Hour BUI Becomes a Law In 
New York. 



American Contracts In England. 



A pleasant Interest in the I'uited 
States anti a surprise that called for 
official explanation in Kn gland were 
created by the recent placing of orders 
for twenty locomotives, for the Eng- 
lish Midland Railway, with American 
buildeta. 

The explanation by the chairman 
of the company conveys a high com- 
pliment to American artisans, and 
makes a vivid exposition of the 
general manufacturing methods in 
the two countries. 

As long ago as Decent ber, 1897, the 
company began placing orders in Eng- 
land for 1 ;> > locomotives. Up to Feb- 
ruary 15. 1899, not a single delivery 
had been made, though forty- eight 
should have been turned over to the 
company by that date. 

In its strait the company tendered 
contracts to two American firms, one 
of which promised to deliver within 
ten weeks from the receipt of the 
order, and the other during March, 

Finding that they could not get an 
engine made in England in less than 
lift ecu months, and that they could 
get twenty built and shipped In the 
United States In four months, the 
directors had authorized the giving of 
the contracts to American firms. The 
same capacity for speedy delivery 
secured Americans the contract for 
the Atabara bridge, in the Soudan. 



Governor Roosevelt, of New York, 
has signed the bill of Mr, Sabine 
amending the eight-hour law so as to 
make it rigid In enforcement. With 
it he filed a memorandum saying : 

"This bill carries out the recom- 
mendation made In my message to the 
Legislature that the eight-hour law 
should be so amended as to make it 
effective. It will work on the whole 
an undoubted improvement, but un- 
fortunately it is so drawn as to em- 
phasize, instead of eliminating, two 
or three of the defects In the old law. 
The need of the passage of this law is 
evident. There is at present and has 
long been on the statute books an 
eight-hour law, but it is so easy of 
evasion that it has been largely in- 
operative. It is always detrimental 
to the best interests of the state to 
have a law on the statute books which 
pretendB to do something and does not 
do it, and this, of course, is especially 
the case where it is highly important 
that the nominal end sought to be 
attained really should be attained. 
The general tendency toward the 
eight hour working day has undoubt 
edly been healthful, and It is wise for 
the state to set a good example as an 
employer ol labor, both aa to the 
number of hours of labor exacted and 
as to paying a just and reasonable 
wage. 

M It is even more important to reach 
contractors who do the state work 
than to reach the public servants of 
the state proper. Cheapness secured 
by the employment of gangs of men 
under the padrone system is cheap- 
ness for which the state pays alto- 
gether too dearly, for It is obtained at 
the cost of the sacrifice of good citizen- 
ship. It is, therefore, just that the 
ordinary employee of the state and of 
contractors who do state work should 
work for but eight hours and should 
receive a rate of wages not less than 
that paid for other labor of the same 
kind where the structure Is to be put 
up, this not interfering with the pur- 
chase of a finished product, 

" The permission to work overtime 
for additional compensation has re- 
sulted in such widespread evasion and 
nullification of the purposes of the 
law, especially among contractors, 
that it is wiBe to take it away in most 
cases. Certain needed exceptions are 
provided for in the bill, but there are 



other exceptions which must be pro- 
vided for by the next legislature, if 
the bill is not to be a cause of needless 
expense to the state in various direc- 
tions. There are some forms of labor 
where though the man is employed 
on and off for more than eight hours 
a day, his labor is not continuous. 

"This is notably the case as re- 
gards lock-tenders on the less-fre- 
quented canals. Curiously enough, 
the less work there is to do on a lock, 
the longer is it necessary to have the 
nominal hours for labor. One of the 
most thoroughly satisfactory lock- 
tenders in the state is a woman, the 
widow of the former lock tender, 
whose house is by the lock. It is on 
a canal where work is not regular, and 
days may pass where, all told, she 
may not work more than an hour or 
two a day. Then will come a day or 
two when, owing to the accident of a 
number of boats passing, she may 
work on and off, though not contin- 
uously, from light to light. It would 
be, of course, a great injustice to her 
to diminish her compensation by pro- 
viding for a paid substitute to do her 
work, and it would be a great injus- 
tice to the state to pay such a substi- 
tute in addition to paying her, when 
all told the aggregate of Ler work 
rarely requires her laboring eight 
hours all told, and never requires her 
laboring for eight hours continuously. 

" With a shoveller, a mechanic or 
any other employe who is employed 
for eight hours steadily there is diffi- 
culty ; but both the law as it reads at 
present and the law as it will read 
after the signing of this bill \a not 
framed so that the case of a lock- 
tender can be met under it, save those 
practically continuous. Here the eight- 
hour law can be and shall be applied , 
but I shall hold under this bill, as it 
has been held in the past, that in the 
other places where the work Is not 
continuous, intervals of rest continu- 
ally intervening between the intervals 
of work, the aggregate of the time 
spent per day actually at work is to 
be included In the eight hour law; 
in other words, that we shall not take 
an arbitrary stretch of eight hours, 
«lx of which the man may spend In 
idleness, and call them eight hours' 
work. 

" Another class of cases comes 
under the Superintendent of Public 
Buildings, notably in the Capitol at 
Albany. These employees do not 
average eight hours a day throughout 
the year, because when the Legislature 
is not sitting their work is light ; but 

(Continued on page /.) 



1 



2 



THE CARPENTER. 





:i^aft 



(Tht* Departmrnt la open tor crlllcmm >n« 
• Mraapondcnc* from our readers on mechanical 
•object* In Carpentry , and Ideu ■» to Craft 
•rsanlzatlon. 

Write on one aide 01 the paper only. All 
MtMMi tbouid he §i>> in-. ■ 
Matter for thl» Depart merit irtu.it be- in thl- 
by thr u!hn< «h» mnnlh 



Rule for Dividing a Quadrangular 
Pyramid. 



Bittk, Mont., April », rSog 
The February number of Tin: C ak- 
pKnter has a request by "Unknown" 
for a geometric rule for dividing a 
" Ouandrangular Pyramid" in two, 
with reference to volume, alsD frus- 
tum of same. Notwithstanding I am 
only a fellow " woodbutcher, " I take 
quite an interest in the geometric 
side of doing work, and ever strive to 
get at the most practical way of doing 
work. Thinking that the method I 
have adopted for solving all problems 
that have odd fractions or decimals 
might be of use to others I herewith 
give the same. Looking for abso- 
lute correctness In problems of this 
nature is looking for an impossibility, 
as some one of the dimensions is 
sure to be a fraction or decimal. We 
can get a close approximate, but not 
exaction. This is the stumbling 
block to the solving of the " Quadra- 
ture of the Circle, " although it can be 
done true to four decimal places, and 
probably with greater accuracy. My 
method is to figure all lengths, run to 
three decimal places, if there is more 
than 005 add one to hundreds, then 
with a diagonal scale in inches one 
can set a pair of dividers so as to 
measure the fractional part in tenths 
and hundredths exactly, even to the 
i(f„i, of an inch. A great many car- 
penter squares have this scale on 
near the corner. I will venture to 
say that rB *j 8 of an inch is just about 
as close as the average workman is 
capable of working to. For lengths 
of rafters, braces, etc., I always figure 
lengths true to three decimals, then 
measure whole numbers, and with 
the use of diagonal scale and dividers 
get the fractional part in inches true 
to the 10 | 0( , part of an inch. When I 
want areas, lines, surfaces, volumes, 
etc , I always figure a formula if pos- 
sible, then this answers for all 
problems of this nature. The student 
in geometry should first make note of 
all truths following demonstrations, 
and then keep within these lines. He 
should always make accurate draw- 
ings and correct measurements, then 
the right proportions can be aeen a 
once. 

As to the problem in question, all 
pyramids of the same height are cut 
with a plane parallel to the base, and 
same distance from it, with reference 
to one-half volume. All pyramids 
with same base but different heights 
have same size base for one-half 
volume. All frustums of same height 
whose slant sides terminate in the 
same point, are cut by a plane same 
distance from base with reference to 
one half volume. All frustums of 



nunc top and bottom areas, but of 
different heights, have same alz* bane 
for one-half volume. 

Lit A. B, C, be a section of pyra- 
mid of known dimensions. 

A'. B, C'be a suction of pyramid 
of one-half volume. 

Make .7. « J of B, 6 Extend the 
altitude B. /■. to B . and make B, 15', 
of H b Draw B', «. Make 
6 < . - (j. b Hxtend A, <\ to < mak- 
ing f, , •= B b, with radius ,.\ d 
of rj, f, describe arc a, P, cutting B',0, 
in F\ Then draw A', C, parallel to 
base A, C, through F. Then A , C, 
cuts pyramid in two. making each 
equal to one-half volume of whole. 
This is not absolutely true, making 
1/, K. about , of a unit too short, 
but for all practical purposes is cor- 
rect. The more accurate way would 
be to figure lengths and measure 

To get a formula. I.srtA.C — w. 
H. b — n. Then 



0) 



- " tqual volume of whole 



pyramid a h C 

, 111- 11 ffj ■ n 

(-) , — equal vol- 

ume of 1 pyramid - A', it c. 



in 



is) , 



- A. S 



t ij'ia 



al length 



in units of A, b for every unit of 
same kind) in height of ii. t or for 
every unit in height of U, b ; A. b 
will be represented as many times by 

>n 

in 

(4) I.tt 1 H, b'. 
(t) I hen - ■ 1 

•' 2/1 



A', b'. 
in x 

2H 



(7) (6^ squared , 4) -■ 3 



m- 1 ; 



= % volume of whole pyramid 
A', B, C. 

_ . in ■ n 

Therefore (2) = (7) _ f fi = 

M- X* v 

~ n i ) Transposing and 

ft* 

(S) eliminating x* = x = I " 
2 

which gives the formula for finding 
B, b' in known terms of the whole 
pyramid, or to get altitude of pyramid 
equal to one half volume. Take cube 
root of the perpendicular cubed, di- 
vided by 2, 

By the formula (8) it will be seen 
that only one known quantity the 
perpendicular height) is needed. 

To illustrate: I.et A. C. (in) ( . 
U, If (ft) — <>. Then by the formula 

mm ml = ,\ 0)t = 

2 2 

4 7622 = B, b'. This is the height ot 
the pyramid of one half volume of all 
pyramids, whose height is 6. 

To find base A, C, take formula 
. , m 4 , B. A 

(3) 2« ■ 2 X 6 ' f ' 1 

A, B, C and A', B, C are similar. 
Therefore / . j / 2 = 3,174* 

= A', &, 

Formula (n ^ = 

J 3 
32 = volume A, B, C. 



Formula < 1 



jo — volume A, ' H, *" 

in tlx pew pyramid, W B, C iw 



have mi inula ( 1 1 



volume 



(A'. C) ( H, /'') }-K\ s ' ■ 1 r ,,j - 

= If.. 

Pot the frustum 1 have not found 
any geometric demonstration that is 
applicable to all. 

Let a. B, c. n be fro turn of jfivea 
dimensions, complete the pyramid by 

draw ing the slant s'd< s to , Draw 
B, <i' parallel |o 

fn r, d Then A C B. C r 3 A. 

( i< >) By stmiUu trianglt s 

A if B (f f : . B, 1 ' < , 1 
in) < ', d ■ 1 . ' 1 . height ot 

complete p> ramid, 
f«3 By formula 1 9tt find volume 
of whole pyramid A . 1 1 

(13) By fnrmnlS We 6bd volume 
of top pyramid H. C, C 

(14) Tlu-u [tJ 1 1 1 1 volume ol 
frustum A, B. C, 1 >. 

(15 One half 1-4 volume », it, c (>. 
(!'>, n;' • 15 volume of near pyr- 
amid, whose base equals baseof n«i), 

Let A. 1 > I ft) 4 I . rf 4- 

Tben by* ; 1 ' 2 1 

A. if. 

By 1 1 1 • 1 I 1 , . i ■>,<'- 
" 1 I I 4 • 3 1 . 

" 'i A. , . 1) i 
" 1 1 ; 1 B, r, C 

'Mm a. b. c, i» 



rj 



By 151 a, B, C, A — ' 
•■ (16 u, s. b \ 1 1 



tt 



Let 



1 , b'. Th« n ht 



hi 
u 



2 • <• 



(18) 



_■ 1 



base a, h. 
1 1 ■ 



By 1 ( ' ) - 1 

volume a i\ b. But I J . 



Therefore 11 S . ||j 

* =.-. ) S| HB ff, b' 

r, A" , , , ' 

4.8a 2 * * • »* 

height of frustum Of one half \oiume. 
By ' IS, i 8a ; j i \ - base 

ii, b, 

which can be measured to th 1 

of an inch by the use of thi- ' Diago- 
nal Srale. '' \Vi:stu « >k j ii Ri, k 

ttnion //.. 



Iron Failure in (Jlasgow. 



A great sensation has been caused 
by the failure of Neilson Brothers, 
Glasgow, Scotland, an important firm, 
engaged in the iron and steel trade. 
They had long "beared" Glasgow 
pig iron, and were heavily oversold 
when the - orner in warrants was 
engineered. It is calculated that the 
concern lost $i ,250,000 during the 
past year. The total of the liabilities 
is unknown. 

Neilson Brothers were the largest 
dealers and exporters of ship plates in 
Scotland. 



l lrpnanl s I hat Work. 

There in a great difference between 
the elephant an one see* him at ti. 

circus 01 at tin- '/.OO and the bu- 
workaday elephants of India, Mm 111.1!, 

Siam and the Fast generally. At tin 

circus and the / mi the elephant i^ g 

gentleman of bespangled ieiaure, or ; ,i 
least chiefly remarkable for bisinb 

lectual qualifications. In India on- 

a wairioi in the battlefield, the friend 
of princes and rajahs, he now is rhri 
or leai of ;« dav laborer, and, us 
>h >wn in th> pictures, can do ■ dsj 
woik in a lumber yard with grace an 

ease. 

Heavy timbers that with us woul ' 
be lifted by machinery -.Ming on 

g i.mt cranes, or pushed sPUUt OV 

trucks, the elephant lefts up nncci 
cernedly, lie is also c odatpuahinu 
and pulling and can set up <,r takt 
down a lumbt t j'ih- and do all soi t.s 1 1 
odd ■ and chores that are requin I 

of btm, A> tin Hindoos take [if 

easily, enjoy ordeiing the elephant 
a), out and lazily ttatrb him as bi 
play* the lumberman under thi 
direction Rlephanti thus engagi I 
may not have good a time as tht i 
brothers «>f the /•»>, but they t ik< 
life serenely and seem to enjoj arorl 
as nint h as tin neat OHC. 



iO«n« U%il Service Stumper".. 

Down in Trxaa the i*n-tnl Stall 
Treasury I>epattmen1 has a force oi 
•■ ran^t riders ' who patrol the Mt \ i 
tan border to prevent smuggling and 
like everybody elae in the eivfl net 
vice of the government, the* arc 
appointed after examination from !:m 

of eltgihles, The examinations an. 

supposed to be appropriate to ti:»- 
case, to ascertain the fitness of caodi- 

dates f»*r their pcenliaf <luti* s and t" 
•lettrmine their 'general Intel!! 
gence."' 

Not long ago wiun th«- civil Ser- 
vice Commisaioners were holding an 
examination for " range riders, " ou< 

of the "general intelligence" qui 
tions was : 

" Where is the Bay of I undy ? 

< )ne of the ca" .dates, a cow! . . 
who had more ai l ve experience thai 
hook learning, wrote opposite t) 
question on his examination paper* 

" I don t know where it is ; I ntvel 
heard of it before, but I'm might) 
sure it is not on the Texas border 

Th« examining board gave him fu, 
credit for a correct answer. 

A similar reply was given by a - 
ored applicant for a position in th< 
railway mail Her vice in North Cai 
lina. U'hen aaked the distance from 
the mouth of the Congo Klvet to tht 
Cape of Good Hope he replied : 

■ I don't know. It looks ago- 
ways on the map, but I never heap! 
how many miles it is. I could te ' 
better the distances in North Cai 
Una " 

A more self-conscious applicant 
who was asked how to avoid the odoi 
of cooking in the kitchen and of am 
mals in the stables, impertinent! \ 
responded \ 

" Do your cooking in the stable and 
keep your critters in the kitchen." 



THE CARPENTER. 



8 



Wights lluty Obligation. 



BY s.\m. L. i.ki ns<.\\ KUU, 



CHK queattafl of rights comes 
up m the mind of every one 
who has Miflinent intelli- 
gence to give It thought, 
ami the definition given ;is 
to wh.it constitute rights areas varied 
as the wants. desires ;tnd aspirati-ms 

of ih«- Individual which prompt the 
Inquiry. According to idea* exprawed 

by one writer, rights have their corre- 
spondem e in duties "They may he 
■rbitrartly icperated, bat "<>t without 
tlit- defect or distortion Of one or the 
other Nights have a moral content 
■mil to every right a duty eorrea p o n dai 
hut it .toes not follow that a right 
cotr< spends, also, to every duty, since 
then- are immediate duties in the 
relations of life, as the duty of a 
child to its parents." 

I'ights and duties have the same 
ground in personality. A right is a 
condition in which there may he a ful- 
lilltntnt of duty; hut a right is not 
Minply the means for the fulfillment 
il ;t duty, only the instrument by 
which a duty is performed ami having, 
apart from that, no significance. 
Rightoi no less the fulfillment of 
duties, have their immediate content 
m personal ity and are, therefore to 
l.e held not simply as subsequent to 
duties and fi if only an incident to 
them 

The rights of an organic people, or 
national rights, have a vh* den ess of 
unity as they are instituted in the 
realization of the nation as a moral 
uemn. They do not coriijK>se simply 
a formal system. Th y are not a meTe 

accamnlattoa of institutions to be 

he! 1 by the people as a budget of re- 
ceipts, nor do they exist as proceeding 
from the duties Of the j<eople, as the 
resultant of certain obligations. The 
rights of the people subsist in the 
consciousness of the twople in its 
unity, and this Is the condition of 
political rights. They War in their 
form the imprint of the type of the 
nation 's individuality, and are the ex- 
pressions of its spirit. They constitute 
its political order. There is apparent 
in the institution of its rights the 
physical condition of the people, the 
age, the land, the climate, the races, 
but these only modify while they can 
not determine its process this is de- 
termined only in the freedom of the 
peop.v, and is the manifestation of its 
spirit. 

There is a certain representation of 
rights In which they are defined as 
original and acquired rights Hut 
strictly there is only one original right, 
the right of personality and to this all 
others may lnr referred. It is the right 
which is primitive in the rights of 
man, the right of a man to lie himself. 
The term acquired rights, when rights 
are held as the acquisition of private 
property of < ertain individuals or 
families, denotes a condition isolated 
from the normal or organic being of a 
nation, and deriving its i ontent from 
traditional force, or custom, or acci- 
dent, it describes rather the privilege 
or prerogative of an individual or a 
class. These may invade the whole 
sphere of natural rights, and when 
encroaching upon them, become, in 
reality the ancient wrongs of a people. 



Acquired rights are positive, but they 
have no necessary basis, and exist 
only as a creation of law. 

The origin of government has been 
traced by dillerent writers to four 
sources -divine right, paternal au- 
thority, election and force. The most 
reasonable and sensible of conclusions 
arrived at, however, Is th«- one which 
traces It to only two— election and 
force -and that it has originated some- 
times in the one and sometimes in 
the other, according to the state ol 
society at the time and the number of 
which It was composed. This pro po- 
sition admits of a clear and Batisfac 
tory demonstration The other sources 
divine right and paternal authority 
can find no advocates, ir reason 
and understanding, excepi among 
the advocates o r despotism and those 
of hereditary rights. 

I ine of our early and most eminent 
of statesmen, President lames Mon- 
roe, left a small work, entitled 
'■ The People the Sovereigns," which 
was not published until after his 
death, and in which he expressed 
some indisputable views on the sub- 
ject of " rights " on the question of 
the " < irigin of f .overnment " These 
vUws would be too long for the space 
allotted to tins paper ami can only be 
referred to in substance briefly. 

Divine and paternal rights appear 
to rest on the same basis, although 
not so understood by writers who 
have traced government to these 
sources. If divine, the claimant or 
pretender must prove his title by 
some miracle or incontestable evi- 
dence, or it most commence with the 
parent , and, beginning with him, be 
subject to all views applicable to that 
title. They must either accord or be 
in opposition to each other, No ad 
vocate of either places them in oppo 
sition ; and if they accord, it must be 
by meaning the same thing under 
different names < >f course, both are 
absurd in the extreme, and might be 
unworthy of notice, if it were not 
that they have been given great weight 
by distinguished and able writers on 
the subject of government. It is only 
necessary to simplify the subject to 
rid one s mind of all such absurd 
doctrines. 

In tracing regal power (royalty) to 
the paternal source, we trace it to a 
single pair from whom the whole 
community must have descended ; f 
otherwise the origin could not havi 
Iteen paternal. If this be the source 
of powf. it must have commenced 
with the human race; and, admitting 
the authority of the Mosaic account, 
with our first parents, and to preserve 
the succession, have descended in the 
right line to the oldest son, from gen- 
eration to generation, to the present 
day. If the right ever existed It must 
have commenced at that epoch and still 
exists, without limitation as to time, 
generation, population or its disper- 
sion over the earth. A limitation of 
the right in either of these respects 
would be subversive of it, to over- 
throw and ruin it. To what term 
confine it ? Through how many gen- 
erations must it pass ? To what nutn - 
ber of persons, or extent of territory 
carry it ? I low dispose of it, after 
these conditions should have been 
fulfilled 5 The mere admission that 
such limitations were prescribed, 



would be to admit that the right 
never existed. And, If not limited, 
it would follow that one man would 
now be the sovereign or lord of all 
the Inhabited globe. Any one can 
ask himself If anything could be con- 
ceived that would be more absurd. 

Do any of the sovereigns of the 
pn sent day trace their titles to Adam 
or to any other first-parent? Or 
would they be willing to rest it on 
that ground ? We know that they 
would not, and if they did that It 
would fall, since the commencement 
of all existing dynasties may be traced 
to other sources ; to causes such as 
operated at the moment of their 
derivation, and varied In diflerent 
countries. Does any community, in 
Kur jpe or elsewhere, trace its origin 
to a single pair, unless It be to our 
first parents, and which 1b common to 
the human Tace ? We know that 
except in their instance, and at the 
creation of mankind, societies have 
never commenced In that form ; and 
that such have been the revolutions 
in every part of the globe, that no 
existing race or community can trace 
its connection in a direct line, with 
Adam, Noah or others of that early 
epoch. In the infant state of every 
society, individuals seek each other 
for safety and comfort, Those who 
are born together, no matter from 
whence their parents came, live to- 
gether, and thus increase and multi- 
ply until the means of subsistence 
becomes scanty. A portion then with- 
draw to some other quarter where the 
means can be procured, and tl us new 
societies have been formed, and the 
human race spread over the earth 
through all Its babitanle regions. 

From every view that can be taken of 
the subject, the doctrine of divine or 
paternal right as the foundation of a 
claim in any one to the sovereign 
power of the state, or to any portion ot 
it, is absurd. It belonged to the dark 
ages and was characteristic of the 
superstition and idolatry which pre- 
vailed in them. All men are by nature 
equally free. Their Creator made 
them so: and the inequalities which 
have grown up among them, and the 
governments which have been estab- 
lished over them have proceeded from 
other causes, by which their natural 
rights have been subverted . We must 
trace governments to other sources ; 
-.nd in doing this, should view things 
as they are and not indulge in super- 
stitious, visionary and fanciful specu- 
lations. 

It is said that Rousseau founded all 
morality upon personal interest. And 
the accusation is probably just. No 
man will enter adult life without the 
germs of that social conscience which 
animates a man with all the associa- 
tions of duty and right, of gratitude 
for the past and resolute hope for the 
future, in the face of the great body 
of which he finds himself a part. It 
has been observed that in modern ages 
men have no hold upon one another 
save through force and interest, while 
the ancients, on the other hand, acted 
much more by persuasion and the 
affections of the soul. With the 
ancients — those of the Greeks and 
Romans — the social conscience was so 
much wider in its scope than the 
comparatively narrow fragment of 
duty which is supposed to come under 



the sacred power of conscience in the 
more complete and less closely con- 
tained organization of a modern state. 
The neighbors to whom a man owed 
duty in those times comprehended all 
the members of his state ; the neigh- 
bors of the modern preacher of duty 
are either the few persons with whom 
ench of us Is brought into actual con- 
tact, or else the whole multitude of 
dwellers on the earth. 

This paper has been extended far 
beyond the purpose of the writer, but 
its motive is one of purity in its 
intent. It would be an insult to the 
intelligence of the reader to doubt his 
capabilities of comprehension. The 
dullest mind can and will grasp a 
suggestive thought that will aid him 
in working out his own destiny. We 
are all mere creatures of circumstance. 
Preach and pray how we may ; plead 
and implore how we will, the Inevit- 
able fate awaits us to accept and receive 
what befalls us; and if we fail to 
recognize and maintain our rights In 
the struggles of life, we are derelict 
in a duty prompted and impelled by 
the profoundest impulse of our being 
and self preservation. 

"The nan With the Hoe" 



Bo«fH by llie weight of centuries he leans 
rpon hi*, h * and gar^p on thr ground, 
The emptiness of ages in h's face. 
And on hi* back the burden of the world. 
Who made him dead to raplnrr and drspair, 
A thing that grieves not a ill that never hope-,, 
Stolid and slunned. a brother to Ihe ox ' 
Who loosened and let down this brutal jaw ' 
W h ise was the hand thai slLnted luck this brow' 
Whose breath blew out the light within thu 
brain 1 

Is thi* the Thini; the Lord Cod made and gave 

To have dominion over sea and land ; 

To trace the Mat* and search the i. ravens for 

power : 

To feel the pa«sion of Kte-nity r 
Is this the Dream He dreamt- ; who shaped the 
»\in* 

And tallirt-d the blue firmament with light 
Il.wn all the stretch nl Ifrll to its la^t gulf 
There is vo *h»pe more re rrible than this— 
More tongued with censure of the world's b'ind 

({feed- 
More iilled with sjjnsand purlenta f ot the soul— 
Moie Irit ught with menace to the uni-erse. 
Whs: gulfs between him and Ihe seraphim 1 
Slave of the wheel of labor, what to him 
Are Katoand the swing of l'teiade*> 
What the long- reaches of the peaks of song. 
The rift of dawn, ihe reddening of the rsse ? 
Thro-jgh this dread shape the suffering ages 

look | 

Time's tiagedy is in that aching stoop ; 
l'h n,ugh this dread shape humanity betrayed, 
Plundered, profaned and disinherited, 
Cries protest to the Judges of the world, 
A protest that is also prophecy. 
O. masters, lords and rulers in all lands, 
Is rni* the handiwork you give to Out, 
This monstrous thing distorted and aoul 
rjuenched? 

How will you ever straighten up this shape ; 
<*.i»e back the Hawaii looking and the light : 
Rebuild in it the music and the dream ; 
Touch it again with immortality ; 
MlW' right lilt- immemorial inf.-.mies. 
rVrfidkua wiongs, imruedicahle woes » 
O, masters, lonls and tulersin all.lands, 
How will the Future rei.kon with this man 
How answer his brute question m that hour 
When whirlwinds uf rebellion shake the world ' 
[low will it be with kingdoms and with kings— 
With those who shaped him to the thing he is — 
When this dumb terror shall apply to Cod, 
After the sileuie of the centurtM - 

Kdwin Makkham in.V. F. Examiner. 



Dull In Cincinnati. 



Cincinnati, O., April 10, 1899. 
The daily press reports, of the great 
activity in the building trades in Cin- 
cinnati, are much overdrawn, as it Is 
but little in advance of other seasons, 
and can easily be completed by resi- 
dent mechanics, some of whom are 
even now losing time occasionally, 
J. If. Meyer, 
D, C. Secretary. 



4 



INSTRUCTIVE AMD INTERESTING 
ITEMS. 



Why Eight Hours? 



B*.c.iuse — 

Under the present long-hour day 
BUUty are unerr ployed, and the man 
on the street fixes the wages paid the 
man at work. 

The price of labor is regulated by 
the supply. Eight hours work would 
reduce the supply. 

Labor saving machinery has in- 
creased the productive capacity of 
workmen to such a degree that the 
workmen in justice should be afforded 
more leisure. 

The eight-hour day would increase 
the longevity of the workers. 

It would give greater opportunity 
for social and educational develop- 
ment. 

It would raise the standard of liv- 
ing, upon which business prosperity 
depends. 

It would give men a chance to get 
acquainted with their families. 

It would promote temperance by 
removing the desire for stimulants 
which comes from long hours of labor. 

It would make better citizens, by 
giving the citizen more time to under- 
stand his duties. 

It would help the tax paser by 
putting the tramp at work. 

It would promote an independent 
spirit, which is too often lacking in 
overworked people. 

It would build up trade unions, 
and concentrated effort is the law of 
success in the militant world of in- 
dustry. 

It would open up the road to every 
desirable social reform. — The Libe ra 
tor. 



Change for the Better. 



The time was, within the remem- 
brance of some ol our older members 
of union organizations, when it was 
almost the loss of a working man's 
claim to a situation to approach a 
legislator, or even a city councilman, 
in behalf of some little reform in the 
Interest of labor, liven the press 
sneered and hooted at his efforts. 
"There were none so poor as to do 
him reverence " But by gradual en- 
ergetic organization in many trades 
and a coalition of the interests of 
these trade*, the claims of labor are 
becoming quite as potent and efforts 
in their behalf quite as powerful as 
those of the average legislator or 
newspaper editor. Of course they 
cannot be forced to give labor all it 
asks. The former, as a law maker, is 
not the fawning, cringing sycophant 
he once was in the hands of capital, 
and if he doesn't do much for us he is 
careful not to attempt the framing of 
laws agaiust us; while th» average 
editor doesn't now, as of yore, spend 
all his time in damning organized 
labor and reporting Its adherents as 
outlaws, anarchists, etc. This grad- 
ual change for the better should urge 
every one within the fold of organiza- 
tion to increase his efforts to gather 
in all those who are still on the out* 
side and make more secure the benefits 
he is now enjoying— Topograph teal 
Journal, 



THE 



Conservative Counsel. 

* 

Experience has taught us the fact 
that holding our hands on the throats 
of our neighbors and brothers will 
not enhance our own respiration, or 
hardly recompense us for the time 
used in our frantic efforts to throttle 
him. Better, far better that we rise 
as humane teachers and use our 
endeavors to show those who are in 
darkness that there is " a most excel- 
lent way,' assisting them to lav- 
aside petty jealousies and hateful 
spites, which cannot but retard and 
hinder the progress of the fatherhood 
of God and brotherhood of man in its 
onward course. Let us lay aside the 
garb of selfishness and suspicion and 
don the new garb of helpfulness and 
brotherly love and by concerted action 
push the cause on to an assured suc- 
cess — El tins: ille . !it:anre. 



Organization Means Power. 

The ordinary workingman respects 
an organization with power enough to 
force him into it, and he justly 
reasons that only such an organiza- 
tion can be of benefit to himself and 
the trade ; hence it is why such people 
eventually as a rule become gocd 
members. The nou unionist usually 
has little faith in the passible power 
of a trade union, and takes advantage 
of the doubt by plodding along 
despairingly until the more coura- 
geous worker jostles him along in the 
march toward a systematic and equit- 
able control of the trade, through 
organization. A little training and 
education in the union soon convinces 
the previously unwilling member that 
to force him into the union is like 
compelling people to take a bath 
against their own will or taking a 
load from the shoulder of a man 
foolishly bent into carrying it to the 
top floor of a building, and placing it 
upon the elevator for him. A trade 
union is a school in which education 
is compulsory, and the scholar re- 
ceives an equal and immediate practi- 
cal benefit— Garment Worker, 



Shirking Members of Unions. 

There are men who join trades 
unions merely to have the name of 
being members— they nevtr have the 
remotest idea ol ever accepting any 
office of fulfilling any duties. They 
never go near the meetings unless 
compelled to do so. They desire to 
have all the benefits to be derived, but 
are unwilling to take any part in 
securing them. There is nothing so 
mean and despicable as the man who, 
joining a trades union, shirks the 
duties of membership. A man who 
keeps out of the union is bad enough, 
yet he can at least claim an honest 
purpose, but the man who plays the 
hypocrite that he may secure the 
benefits, and is unwilling to share 
with his brother members a fair share 
of the work, is beneath the contempt 
of all fair minded men and is a drug 
on the market of trade unionism. So 
then, you lukewarm members, come 
up to the scratch ; do your duty like 
men. Come up to your meetings and 
there ventilate your honest opinion, 
and you will soon walk along on the 
upper paths of unity, liberty and love. 
— The New Era. 



The School of the Masses. 

The trade union is the school of 
the masses. It tenches its members 
how to resist the oppression of classes 

of specially favored and law defy- 
ing trusts. It teaches the dignity of 
honest lab >r and upholds the living 
wage, without wb ; ch labor is aspeciis 
of slavery, more debased and degraded 
than the lowest whtch obtains in the 
Czar of Russia's dominions. It 
teaches the workingman his true 
condition and educates him up to the 
po ut of being master of himself and 
conscious of his power ar.d sovereign 
rights. It is the common school of 
the common people. It builds no edi- 
fices other than the foundations it im- 
plants in human heaits of steiling 
unionism and the titith of life. It is 
a school at which all men might wor- 
ship with distinct benefit to them- 
selves. It is the laborers hope, and 
his salvation depends upon it ( 'hi- 
cago Federationist, 

What Organization Will Do. 

It will give eft h trade control of the 
market supply of their individual 
craft. It will give to each union 
Collectively and individually a more 
just proportion of its products It 
will enforce a recognition of the 
union's rights. It will finally lessen 
the hours of all trade unions to an 
eight hour work day, and thus give 
the skilled mechanics more chance to 
study the economical question! of the 
day and by so doing become better 
citizens and more intelligent voters. 
By doing all this it wi'l make the 
laboring man a home owner and an 
interested factor in the affairs of the 
nation. Through organization labor 
can bring about all its aims and ob- 
jects, without unity they will all fail, 
These are all principle facts, as clear 
and plain to the reader as they are to 
us. Then is it not better to exert all 
your power to organize your fellow- 
tradesmen into a union if they do not 
have one already, and if there is a 
union of your trade, is it not best for 
you to do all in your power to make 
your union a strong one, by attending 
all the meetings and taking an in- 
terest in all questions brought up for 
consideration —Journal ot Industry. 

Monopolistic Monologue. 

I.el ui corner up Ihe MtabfMM, 

Lying all around our pnth ; 
QCt • trtut 00 wheat and rowa. 

(ii»e the p ior the 1 hoi in and chaff, 
I.t-l u» find oc r chleO<it iileamirr 

Hoarding ItOunUes ol Die da- , 
So the poor will have want niraturr. 

Ami two prkea have to pay. 

Ye*, we'll reservoir tae riven, 

And we'll levy on the lakea, 
And we'll lay a trilling poll tax 

On each poor man thnt partaltci j 
We'll t>iand hU number on him, 

That he II carry through hi* life, 
We'll apprentice all hla chltlrr a, 

Get a mortgage on hla wife. 

We will ca,,lureeVtj the wind go 1, 

And confute bint In a cave, 
Then through our patent ptii.-rm, 

Welheattnoaphere will aave; 
Thua we ll aqueeie our little bioiher 

When he trlea hln lungi 1<> Ml, 
Tut a meter on hit windpipe, 

And prencnt our little I. II. 

We will ayndteate the atari iRht 

And monopolize the moon, 
Clata royally on real daya, 

A proprietary noon. 
For right ofw*y through ocean's apray, 

We'll charge ju»t what il l worth, 
We'll drive our itakca around the lakct ; 

in (act, we'll own the tarlh. 



Eight-Hour Hilt. 

(Con tin ne<l f>< »• /><oy : ) 

when the Legislature is sitting they 
■te Obliged on the first font days ol 
every week to work for more than 
eight hours. Ordinarily, even in 

these cases, the average for the week 
will not be more than eight hours a 
day, Friday and Saturday being light 
davs i>f labor, and it never aveiages 
eight hours a day f if the year. ( >!>vi 
otisly no just purpose can be served 
by taking a highly paid officer, such 
as the t hief engineer at the Capitol, 
who, dining most of the year, may 
not be employed ;nore than from four 
to six hours a day, and prohibiting 
him from seeing to the safety ol the 
delicate engines under his care during 
the time when the Legislature and its 
committees are fitting in the after- 
noons and evenings. The same thing 
applies to the elevator men. 

• This difficulty will notarise umh r 
the present bill until the first of Janu- 
ary next, and 1 shall. In my message 
to the Legislature, request them at 
once to amend the law so that in the 
case of public servants who do not in 
the aggregat- , during their terms of 
employment, work for more than 
eight hums a day on the average, 
they shall be permitted, where any 
emergency arises, to wotk for mort- 
tban eight hours a day. provided 
always that this amount of extra 
work: is in no case to be canted so far 
as to make the average per day for the 
term more than eight hours. The 
alternative to this would be putting a 

needle* additional burden oa the 
state or shutting down the wages of 
theemplo} i el during the time they are 
not employed for eight hours a day. 
It may be that the actual working of 
the law during the next eight months 
will develop some additional defects. 
If so they can be remedied by the next 
Legislature. L'ntil it has actually 
been tried it is probably impossible to 
say whether or not any defect bey< ' 
those indicated above will be found 
In any event it is highly desirable 
that the principle which this law- 
seeks to establish should be really 
established and that the nominal pur- 
j>ose of the eight hour law should be 
in fact fulfilled. 

" I accordingly sign the bill. 

"Tm«odo*x Roobuvsct.'' 

a* 

Tin: eight hour law in all the build 
ing trades went into force in New 
K'ichelle, N. V. ( on May ist. 



Engineers' Hours of Labor, 

The Colorado state officials have 
directed complainants from the engin- 
eers who are employed in city and 
county buildings to file information 
with the district attorney, or to in- 
form him of the violation of the eight- 
hour law with reference to engineers 
in public buildirjgR and works. The 
attorney general decided that the dis- 
trict attorney could institnte a prose- 
cution without formal filing of in- 
formations, and the engineers will see 
to it that their hours are reduced to 
the lawful maximum. Managers of 
the buildings employing the men will 
be prosecuted. 



THE CARPENTER. 



5 



A Model Six Room House. 




BV i i'. in* :ks, omaiia. nkii. 

M this is.sut- W* prtstnt the 
front elevation and Door plans 
of a njoiltrn nix loom house. 
The si/e of this house is 
2', x 40 feet over all hut the 
porrhf-s. Height of :irst story is 9 
feet : second story, S feet 6 inches. 
Cellar is estimated under the whole 
house 7 feet deep. The rooms are all 
larjje and provided with ample closet 
room. There Is a luge front hall, 
hays, hath, plant cabinet, pantry, 



1 80 lineal feet main cornice, 

2" 

■><> lineal feet gutter. 18c. . 
2?. lineal feet ft ont porch, £ 
i'- lineal feet hack porch, 

$2.50 

a 1 windows complete, >7 

3 plate glass windows, 
17 doors complete, ^7 SJ 

1 front door complete 

1 set sliding doora 
10 cellar windows, 52 4., 

3 cellar doors. (3 50 . 

; attic frames, £3 
basing 1 small rOOtO 
Basing 3 large rooms, f So 



39 So 
16 20 

60 00 

2500 
147 00 

^i<j DO 

1*3 25 
10 00 
\<j On 
2\ 00 
IO 50 
9 00 
2 So 

1 i 40 





K.CKM'TS JAMAKY, I -lid. 

From the t nion» tax etc |7..'tl S3 

" Adv.-tti-era Ms &n 

" SutKcrthem 3 *' 

" Miacellnneou* 1 Q 

Rent hi uj 

" Supplies lo It. C 1 

" Claim M > relumed m ney 131 1 >c J 

Italame, Jaiini\rv I. I>0S 1!M .7 

TMa| S-t.chh 

Total expeniea ii,4'iu lo 

Cn«h balance, February I, I "■!*".* . . . . |*),6WS 26 



OKI ULKU KXPKNSB S, JANUARY, MOO. 



chiaa clbaet.'tewiitg room, front and 

hack porches, and on the whole it 
may l)C considered a nuxlel plan for 
a Kfj, room house. The estimated 
* 0«t to bttild is as follows 



yards excavating , i$C, 
■•; cubic feet brick founda- 
tion, loc. .... 
; 7 lineal feet chimney breast. 

i lineal feet triple flue abo\e 
breast, f J. . « 

, iqtuuva first Door, f - 75 . 
■t Bi[uares secord floor, \ 50 



U7 S 
IS6 7 ; 

3 s1 * : 

67 



Bating 1 medium si/.e room . 
Wainscoting kitchen . , 
Wainscoting and finishing 

bath 

Finishing 3 clostts, %i.Ha 
Finishing pantrj* . 



3*5 

S 1 

1 " 00 
5 »" 

llMO 



' ••«•>» : i. _ 

/■ 1 - " ■ r 





I nnltnii (Oil postala 

2.CH.U nrreara notice* . . . 

IT i stamped envelopes 

application bl?ak« .... 

100 G, H B. card* .... 

1.030 stamped envelnpes 

In m«i Constitutions . . . 

.V«.J letter head* . ... 

10.000 mttrtbtfa 1 card* . . 
Kti-re*M»i{e .n C \mpknikr . . . . 
: .«-H«eon January CaRj-i.n t IK . 

rrttitmK 5,009 appear* 

SpecUl writer* lor Cari-kntir . 

l-rr-s Clipping liurtMU 

Ten telegram* 

Htp'ewt»ue en snpplie", f-lc. . . . 
BSfKWMgt from St tJWU .... 

Postage 00 pa** wot d 

"'•J poMala .... 

I ,f 00 stamped envelopea ■ • ■ 

I' .Mage on *K 

< iffcee rent lor la- uary .... 
sstary and ctffk ilire .... 

Tax to A i' . of t. (Decentbtr) . . 

Printed proceedings A K of I.. . 

'Quarterly ga- lull 

Ku >brr sealf • • 

P, J, McOuire, Iravelmg eipe:;**s 
J I). Cowper, o- g, Lowell, M»s« 
c.rtman translator 

Janitor, cleaniui; oAtt ... 

t», J. Mcf'.utre, eai*n-.e» N»w Vurk 
convcntK'n .......... 

1. K andS. C Totter, attorney*. 

Incidental* 

" Ja'ne» M. Line, meeting of G. K. B 

A C, Cnlletmull, " 

J k Miller. 

W J. William*, 

John Willi m». Oca, I'rea. for attend 
ance at O, K B . . • *. . 

Juhn Willtanta. I'.-n. Vtr». . . . 



J K. Millet, V ion I n~e 
l^reniiiini on i\. S T. l^oud 
I> C. 1'itlhtirg. I'.i. ... 
li C. New York. City . . 

Bcaefiu No-, tti.'to 4134 



Tom I 



ft 

A M 

7."> 

; M 
1 no 

I 2, 

IS) 00 
JO 00 
S3 00 

n 

^ 08 

II HI 

M 00 

II) 

1 H 
'A so 

: 75 
HI .^t 

: 00 
U Ju 
■23 ;.» 
33 00 

:10 tw 
trf, i.T 

•J 50 
i: 20 

- 511 
it M 
-^t 00 
ou 

5 Jl 

HI 90 
J5 ou 
l M 

t-J 7.', 

1 a 40 

|«Q 00 

N T "i 

li :« 
1!1 7.". 

t w 

ItOO 50 
.VJ 00 

■"■OU t«J 
4 irj.', H 

$«,IHll III 



KKOKllTS. KKBIU AKY, 1WIM. 



Fr.itti the t'niona. IMS, e'e 

» A lTertiaera . . . 

" Snbacrihera 

•• 1). C suppllea . . . 

■' Ml-^ellaneoiia . . 
ItHlmic.-. l ehiuary 1, MM 



. . . ft W :» 
. . . «.» itt 

I ,'KI 

I M 
. M IN i"i 



. . . a 

■ « 4 



Finishing china closet . 


S 1 11 1 


Front stairs 


. Woo 


Cellar stairs . 


5 00 


(but fitting 


SO 00 


Plumbing 


2KOIIO 


Tin work 


25 00 


Painting 630 yards, 18c. 


. in 60 


Incidentals, 3 per cent. 





Tolal I-" " - M 

lotal fiprtiara O.t'H' 44 



Cash l»liince. Miirch t.lWO 



* f * * 



(OUSt* '.'l 



9 squares ceiling, $t 75 
27 «']tiares outside walls, 

to So 

15 squares roofing. fS.75 
"''j nquaiea partitions, 57 20 
94 lineal feet outside base, 5c 

i4" lineal feet corner caaings, 
60 

i«o lineal feet belt courae, 8c. 



•J" 7S 

256 50 

131 9$ 
1 1 S So 

4 7" 

5 40 
144a 



Total estimate . §2,047 07 

In the above estimate no mention 
of plastering is made, as the plaster- 
ing is figured in with the outside 
walls, fitUingVi partitions, etc., at the 
price per square all complete. 

Windows and doors are figured all 
complete at the price given including 
all material and lobor. 



I)HTAII.KI> l.XPKNSl'.M-KHBKt AKY. 1 

n inting WO Secretary aurder >>ooka ■ 

" »• Toalal* 

" J i '.Iki page lrdgera 

I'l lKipnge ledgers 

I.i.ltu conatilutlona 

" SJOOO noteheada 

IHiliI copiea febtuary CaR- 

IKMTER 

Kleclrotyplng Contiitiitlott ...... 

Kgpmttl* on Felituiiry Cahi imkr 
1-oalage on February Carpkntkr . 
Tranalatlon, coaa|ioaltrou and electro- 
typing of i.ermati Conttiiution . . . 
KngraTinga for February Carpkntsr. 
Special wrltcra February Cakpkntkk 
PrtM Clipping bureau 

Five ttleitmaw 



fi-i 00 

1 X 
•X 00 

'Jo i.'i 
OH ;ki 

4 «l 
4iiS U 

a; mi 
70 
--7 47 

70 H7 
81 H0 

40 M 
6 00 

a to 



K*preMage on suppliea, etc. . . . 

pMlage on auppli-a etc 

M postala 

OAe* rent for February 

■-alary and cle-k hire .... 

John Williams. General I'reaidenl 
vi-it»to New York. Lynn and Poll 
del phi a. etc. . 

Tin to A. F. of L. (January) ... 

special orgatitting asseasment to A 

of r.. . , 

s. A Fuller, attorney 

"h»i Brotherhood pin-. 

kuhb* r aea'a . . 

J M. Kelly, organiziDK Hancoc 

Mi(.h 

J. Ij. Cowper, orgnnifing; Lowell. M i« 
P. J. McGulte, travelling expennes 
<Jne ton of csal and putting in . . 

one stove grate 

Stationery .... ... 

I dozen filing caaes 

I ncidcntiil.s , . ... .... 

J mitor, cle.ining otti^-e . . 
Uenefit't, Noa. -11.17 lo !!(,:• . . . 



Total 



«.-. 75 

90 00 
;. 00 

l«) 

Sly ft 



111 00 
08 hi 

MO (Vi 
23 00 
im) ro 



-, mi 

at i» 

:■! 7u 

.'. 7.'. 

i ua 

.-> 7K 

J.', 

3 M 
t (S 
■l,iS< 00 

fO^IM 44 





FOR TAX, PINS AND SUPPLIES. 

During the month ending February J* 18H9. 
Whenever any error a appear notify the G. B.-T. 
without delay. 



ii 1 il 1 |jj 1 !ii 1 



I— $178 no 103 — II 



:i 7 30 

5—- on U 

« — is io 

7 :>l 40 

X 21 JO 

V 1 I 00 

11) — J 1 ; (m 
I •.'--(• I :m 

l.T 17 00 

IK— 1- 10 
IS— i II - . 

In 3B si i 

20 M W) 

21 ;il 10 

23 — ; w 

'£* 4« i«l 

24 — ^> 
•2?, — 17 m 
*2*l — 34 W 

27 III 411 

»)— | n to 
HI is si 

;.• — :A 20 

$t — 1() - , HO 

as — ~ j -ji 

SH 7 OB 

87 8 00 

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41 — _ ti im 

42 N H) 

44 1H i!.", 

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51 — 36 on 
Ni — si i 31 

firl 16, in 

57 4 It! 

1 1 110 

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til I ill 

«! HH tkl 

H Ift 4fl 

a/, 12 Sf| 

«* 4 Iki 

67 Ml Bi 

tW .' W 

70 s Mi 

71 :i 40 

T2 1| in 

71 — M2 20 

74 00 

76 21 sit 

76 S 2i» 

7K -I 10 

7V h SO 

80 22 00 

HI 11 60 

«2 1 i 

So 1] HO 

H4 4 00 

W 17 10 

(r; — ft, an 

rW 17 HO 

Wl— — 2 HI 

m — \h m 

HI HI 10 

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HH - :t'i tii 

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|Wt^ N 111 

67 20 

UK- — OB M 
mt— 2 '2o 

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J01 4 20 

10 



, mi 

i 70 



'ii 



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ii) 22 



1 1 

1UV 4 

mi* — a 

110 14 

111 x 

112- a 

114 ! r : 

llii 4> 

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MM -i ill 

120 ■ - M tin 

151 — Id on 

122 20 »o 

12H— 12 (H« 

121 — 3 to 

ISB | ; JJ 

12tt 7 no 

127- 12 a) 
I2H— 4 im 

law — u 
laa — :t (x> 
m — .-, yo 
i — a :i 
134 — in a*. 
Ifj — 2S till 

IHh 4 90 

i;rr — - ' 20 
i:tn — 10 m 
no — 2 t41 
1 )2- 2U 62 

14.4 B HO 

144 4 Wl 

14a 10 (X) 

147 M no 

116 1» 00 

14H 7 25 

I,'* 4 60 

152 3 10 

I.V! 10 00 

154 « 00 

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l.'Kt 4 40 

IH0 H2 20 

1HJ- - 2 00 

ii- ; — a. 'jn 
IM- t DO 

I tin— II HO 

167 00 I I 

166 16 at 

liSl 21 Wl 

170 » 441 

[71 11 MO 

1T2 IS HO 

173 I 10 

174 21 1* 

17.5 12 52 

176— Is *m 

177 Ik 10 

176 * «0 

17» 17 U> 

181 1*7 00 

IK3 IS 70 

16. ) 6 HO 

181 -II H5 

m — s , r K» 

166 ■=> 1(1 

187 1! 00 

186 7 m 

160 li 60 

191— I 40 

iwa — I no 

til — 12 so 

1,14 2 M. 

198 — : i ho 

1HH ti W 

)w 27 4. - > 

■•im — 10 20 
;n.l — 10 00 
■g.ri — 21 in 
■21 m — 21 HO 
}M — 10 00 
ji. - , --in 00 

J0rt 4 HO 

*T7— W 20 



20H 12 W) 

2*K* 20 80 

210 IV 40 

211 31 00 

212 - - 1 . 40 
214 ■ 2 80 

m — io 10 

21* — nt io 

22! 4 10 

iKl 

2Z-I B Wl 

227 7 Wl 

2211 — - fl 90 

2*1 t» 70 

231- -11 Ml 

tXi 4 HO 

••;tt_ Ml 
■2-11— 20 00 

a» — 4 40 

2!«1 S 20 

217 — y ;<u 

saa — 1 1 as 

2:K» 14 4*1 

211 1 00 

242 24 80 

2 Hi 2 60 

211 H 40 

246 3 2(1 

247— 24 Nt 

24S 6 60 

251 8 20 

SrB « SO 

255 4 1-0 

257 41 tit) 

258- 16 b0 

25S1 7 Ml 

200 II ,i<t 

■2M1 It* 00 

2K2 6 40 

>m — 12 ofi 

261 !' 93 

266 — i m 

■jf\H r{ ho 

27H 1" :ki 

28rt 14 1)0 

287 — » on 

288 5 80 

2t)| Si 00 

2*i 6 20 

301 ;u) 00 

RCI II 00 

HOo — 1 OH 
,4D14—«47 <*) 



421 — r> 20 

127 GO 80 

128 7 26 

42» II 10 

433 14 70 

4.44 40 

1H7 ii 46 

4,ill 8 HO 

44(1 17 56 

442 3 30 

414 8 40 

iiH — a bo 

1449 tit 20 

4 )1 — 26 HO 

453 ;« M0 

457 41 00 

460 2 20 

4*2- -12 40 

4«4 41 20 

4«7 4 CrO 

471- — 1H 20 

-17:4 ;j-t 40 

474 4 20 

476 57 60 

478 47 60 

4X2 11 Ml 

484 11 HO 

486 13 26 



-28 40 



Ufl — 

lilt* — — 1 20 
;i23 — 2 ;o 

9H 7 nil 

8W— 'i 40 
fjj 20 70 
1432 — 6 60 
;t« — 10 M 

Hi(4 rt 15 

:440~ *«« Nl 

312 — 4 at 

313 17 10 

3tH 4 20 

34» 7 20 

009 11 00 

OW 14 75 

:t.irt :t so 

:«4» — 10 10 

;(«] H2 50 

:r7,, — 140 «) 

376 4 00 

.381 — 21 10 

381! 70 40 

3KH— ~ 5 20 

384 14 60 

4110 3 60 

4*12 6 110 

406 4 60 

407 6 00 

40H- 2 20 
118 Hit 30 

70 



• • . ■ . 



463 18 20 

4M7 40 65 

4164 6 60 

507 8 50 

5W— 43 50 

516 17 10 

621 21 15 

522 12 80 

- 20 
14 40 
663--1SW 70 
564— » 80 

567 24 60 

3 85 

581 15 60 

SH8 14 so 

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#2 17 4U 

Mf 8 -J) 

3 SO 

4 80 

HII Ii 00 

612 7 66 

817 I 20 

622 17 20 

j 1128 3 60 

«3;l 6 00 

637 — 8 00 
638— 6 SO 

IH3W U HO 

660 — 4 00 

662 IS II) 

001 3 M 

I Ha* 12 1/0 

0B7 5 20 

67t1 5 00 

67H--S-II «0 
667-- H 10 

6»2 ,( f0 

IttM 6 00 

pi 7 00 

704 1 76 

7it7 22 60 

712 9 00 

TU II SO 

716 65 00 

714- -20 00 

717 4 00 

72S — 14 U6 

TJb 22 10 

7W I lo 

74B 2 «) 

760 12 20 

757 » 40 



i*:m w 



THE CARPENTER. 



The Construction of « Framed 
Auditorium. 



rsv OWEN II. M.V'.IXNIS. 



N last month's article 1 treated 

on the detailed construction 

of framed tenement dnwlt- 
ings ; in this 1 propose to 
explain fully the method of 
framing adopted in one of the peat 
known timber au JitoriunM in the 
United States, the place where many 
famous pugilistic encounters have 
taken place. I refer to the building 
called the Coney Island Athletic 
Club. 

This immense framed structure was 
originally designed and built for a 
skating rink at the time of the skat- 
ing craze in 1884, and measured 13$ 
feet in width by ;,oo feet in length 
over all. The building consists oi 
three parts or sections on plan, 
namely, a main floor or exhibition 
part 75 feet in width and two aisles or 
wings, reserved for galleries for 
spectators each 25 feet wide. 

The construction mainly consisted 
of a series of brick piers and timber 
13-inch posts, spaced 15 feet apart 
and sunk to rest on concrete bases, as 
seen in the transversa section of I he 
building Fig. 1, each capped with an 
8-inch blue stone. On these heavy 
12 x 14-inch yellow pine longitudi- 
nal girders were set. The outside 
lines of girders allowing the ends of 
the 12 x 12-inch square vertical 
columns to rest directly on the centers 
of the cap stones The girders being 
tied together by an inside 3-inch 
band solidly spiked to the posts and 
girders as seen in Fig. 2. On these 
girders the floor beams were placed, 
spaced iG inches apart and overlapped 
nd spiked together at the girders. 
When the main supporting columns 
were framed and raised, they were 
plumbed and strongly braced to the 
floor beams with 2 inch plank braces, 
and thus held until the braces and 
wall plates were framed, raised and 
set. Here I might state that the 
raising was all done with gin poles, 
one being a light [o-inch stick of 
yellow pine timber, used for the posts 
and timbers, and the other, used to 
raise the trusses, being an immense 
round stick of Canadian spruce 
60 feet long, [o Inches at the 
top and 16 inches at the butt. Both 
were stayed with rope gujsand rigged 
with four sheaved blocks and tackles, 
thus giving great lifting power. 
The last pole was equipped with a 
drum and horse gear. When the 
plates were being framed and set, a 
special gang of men was engaged in 
framing and putting together the 
trusses, the design of which is readily 
seen at Fig. 1. They were of the 
Howe class, modified to give a pitch 
to the roof, and consisted of a lower 
chord or tie beam 75 feet long, made 
up of two 40 foot 8 x 12 inch yellow 
pine timbers spliced at the center as 
at Fig. 3 and strengthened by having 
a 2- inch oak plate bolted on each aide 
to prevent its breaking or springing 
sideways. Into the upper edge of 
this beam were framed the principal 
rafte- A, Fig. 4, the diagonal braces 
and struts all being fitted with tenons 
and the beams mortised to receive 
them, iiach end of each diagonal 



brace abutted at the upper and iowei 
chordal beams, and each brace was 
coped out tO tit over the 2 inch 
Wrought iron suspension tie 11. ds, 
which tightened Op the entire truss. 




\ 'v 



7*7 



*- T. ' • ♦ ^ 1 

! : 




Fig, 1. 



These trusses were braced with long 
diagonal corner braces to the postei 
thus stiffening the building laterally, 
directly under each Uuks, and carrying 
the pressure down to each post and 
thence to the />< nt or lean to shed roofs 
of the wings or aisles, wliich being 
constructed of main posts opposite 
the columns which are braced laterally 
from the rafters overhead, and longi- 
tudinally from the plate to the pott, 
thu* making it a strong rigid struc- 
ture. 

( tn top of the upper chord of the 
principal trusses short 5 foot uprights, 
resting on a longitudinal plate wfre 
raised so as to give light from above 
and permit of pivoted sashes being set 
in the sides for ventilation. These 
were set in frames nailed to studding 
and were set close together so as to 
give plenty of air space. 



I 



fltrtrt 



Flu 



' ■ — 1 — [Tj 

"*5 e»*r 



The Auburn, Fa , Bolt and Nut 
Works have notified their employees 
that eight hours per day will consti- 
tute a day's labor. The hands are very 
much pleased with the firm's action, 
as the excessive heat during the sum- 
mer months is very severe, resulting 
in many prostrations. 



1 ' \ 



Pta. 3. 




Fro 4. 



THE CARPENTER. 



Orawlnif Lesson No. 2 , 



H\ 1 1 r„ grout) \KU. 



Mi « MANIC Kt. I>n \\\ r.V( 





i 







N this initial 
htter .lone, 
jus Hmall as 

it is, then 
is a com- 
plete lis-,on 

Of 1 1 «« 1 1 
ly it ran (\iliy. 

• lirawin- bwA tot practice woik 
rnuj b« made with 1 -inch pin,- 

■ | ah' ml a fn. >l " id« ami fatt 

■ by ••imply Railing n ptaic <m 
ell !-. to kti ji it from warping. 

i ti pent* r can in ike his own, nlso 
■in.- Rod 15 triaaglf A few 




> i 



thtlOtb til ks an I a piece t.f paper a id 
the outfit is complete. 

I. iy all your work out with a tend 
pencil notire hov tin- 45" triangle 
laya nit hip rafte-ft. etc 

S'ottCt thecu'of wy T square. It is 
sited the Hay f-cc|UCfc, and made hy 
'>. T Ames \- (Jo , X>a Btoadwry, 
Nt w York it is the lie>t T s<pi irt 
nude as f )f ;,h I know. 




In amuall cut I show my dfttlttg 
Wt; it i8 a 8aiall Mt aB( , 

^75.y«tltU«Ui h . Veeverhadn)( , 



Will fee &t] an ordinary carpenter will 
neel in Ins life time. 

I:i fact, the drawing pen is the main 
tiling needed ami can he bought for 
■bout fiftj cents. 

i ; irst thing to learn in mecbeukttl 

drawing M to make nice lines 





— - : . ' ' . 


■ * ■ ■ ' wfl 






. — 






. " ~ 








: 



TTTTT 



<_ 



Prat 'ire making lines until you can 
make them n icily with jrotw drawing 
]•< n and India ink. 

Then lay oil a complete 'hi'>r and 
111 ike one '.ike I have illustrated Hy 




making the lines closer together and 
further apart, lighter ami heavier, 
bring out the parvN, glass, etc. 

Practice with your compasses by 
making a rosette. 



Then with T-square and pen make 
1 square newel post and a round col- 
umn ; notice how it is all brought out 
with straight lints. 

This may seem a hard lesson and of 
little value, but I give it for the line 
practice. Remember it was made by 
a common carpenter, and you can 
make anything he can. 

1'ractice all you possibly can. and 
get ready for next lesson, which will 
be geometrical and very simple. 
♦ • — 

Words of Warning to the Wi.se 

When you are caught in the rain, 
do not repine . but thank your fortune 
that jou have no good clothes to be 
Spoiled by the drenching. 

When your lower limbs ache with 
rheumatism, rejoice that you are 
neither a dog nor a table nor any other 
kind of qua Imped. Two aching legs 
are only half as bad as four. 

When your hat blows away, con- 
gratulate yuutself that you are not a 
woman and that jour loss Is only 
thrteor four dollars instead of twenty- 
ti ve or thirty. 

When the man b'iiind you treads 
upon your foot, be thankful that your 
heels are not so long as his act would 
seem to indicate. 

When you lose your pocketbook. 
" ffer up thanksgiving that there was 
only a dollar or two in it and not a 
hundred dollars. 

I>c not boast that the first time you 
mounted a bicycle you rode right ofl 
as if you were an expert. It may be 
true, still it is well to preserve one's 
reputation for veracity. 

W lu-n somebody recommends some- 
thing for your cold, show your appre- 
ciation of his kindness by tellinghim 
when next you mett how greatly it 
bvmiit'.-d y *u. ft will please him 
mightily and it will not do you any 
harm, or not nearly so much as if you 
had taken the stuff 

If yen hear something to the disad- 
vantage of a friend do not go to him 
with the story. Tell it to somebody 
el e who will be a more appreciative 
listener. 

Do not waste your time talking 
a! tout yourself. There are plenty of 
persons who will talk about you if 
you give them half a chance 

N'o man is likely to amount to much 
who is not proud of himself, but it is 
nnh the simpleton who allows others 
to know it. 

Always snv what you mean if you 
are miu- t 1 -*hat you mean will be 
pleasant t< .he person with whom 
you are speaking. 

Never speak ill of a photograph in 
presence of the original, except to say 
that it Hoes not do him justice. 

Do not attempt to gain a woman's 
esteem by speaking disparagingly of 
some male acquaintance of hers. She 
will probably be moved to take his 
pirt. letter criticise her female friend 
if von would really give her pleasure 
and make her feel kindly toward 
yourself, -/loslon h an script. 




HI* UJfHlM MADE Mmns. 

It I* an old, well -established principle of the 
Cnited Ilrotherhood of Cnrperiters lor members 
to l.iiy DHMM UMn COOtM in preferenc- to 
0*W» articles. Ami why not? If we a-k fair 
w;wes for our laW, why should we buy ajooriH 
made »t unfair vt«iic» by other*. 

The Union Label In every industry is a Ruar- 
anee of fair waste- d'rent wrjrlcmtr condition* 
and union labor MU ployed 

We here (live a facs-mi e of the t nion Label* 
so our memo^ra mny know t men f.at.rl i:o,hI* 
and make A n point lo a-k :or I hern. 



DMION UAbt UN)!-! ami -ikii-s 




The Boot and Shoe Worker** Tnion Is the 
a*MioM] head of the trade and is a irwcom- 
bH nation of all the bran, he* of boot and shoe 
woikers. The atiove trade-mark when found 
on tne lonl or lining of a boot or shoe, la a 
(itiaraniee that the same is made by union labor, 
fin account of the introduction of so-called 
lasting machine* and "scab" workmen, the 
boot and shoe worker? deemed it necessary to 
take ibis effective mean* lo protect themseUea 
and t urchat.ers of footwear from unscrupulous 
manufacturers. The union made a hoes and 
trttoti are .^id as cheap as the inferior article. 



■Lea nam. cioah. 




Unioi)-maao ticur*. 
MtiOln tate 




This Label Is printed in black ink on light blue 
paper, and is pastea on the cigar-box. Don't mix 
it up with the l\ S. Kevenue label on the box. aa 
the latter is nearly of a similar to lor. See that 
the Cigar Makers Blue Label appear! on the box 
from which you are served. It insures you 
against Chineae-madccif ara and tenement-made 



PATRONIZE UNION CLERKS. 

All liitmbert of the P. CM, P. A, can ihow this 
Ask for il when making your purchase!. 

£ naortid t-i th* A. f of L. 




wg 1 ; sage smews w w.i iawitAND 




COLOR IS CHANGED EACH QUARTER. 



tATIALCAMATEO ' . 

UNION 



'WOOOWORKERV 

MADE 




ataxxtt att rxnritATint i a del 

Tins tjib-I Is used 011 all 
gOodi ma.le by t'niuHmen 
» 0#Ct »4 with LTotoss 
! S>fii Mated with the ,Amerl- 
111 Keileratlori of J.mIht, 
, Svher^ Put h unions have 
lio >t, -nil. live trade Ubel 
pf their own. Tliis lal<el 
ii< t>riitlud 011 white tiauar. 



IMOU IRXAD. 

int«raall«Bil TWi -< the Label of Ike 
J. iinmiitiin Bakara and 
t'oufeeiiunara, under their 

I ■■„:•-■ ;.»! I'll Ion It U 
;<riiitr,l 011 wbll* paper Id 
black Ink and la 
each loaf of bread. Iti 

daath to lunejl 




8 



THE CARPENTER, 

orrici \l JOCatfAtj op vuk 

United Brotherhood of Carpenters and 
Joiners of America. 

Pushed Mmtkljtm the i iji.-.-nth ,>f nth n n th. 

AT 

l.ipVlm.ill HmMi.it. I'lOU.iHj.Mn, Pit. 

v j. M«Oc]<k«»JUItorwuiraMUbcr, 

1'iitrrtJ nt the foCt-Oflkt nt ■'■ V, liin. 1 .1 , 

n- ti e md^toM Butter. 

KCMcatifiojf Psks t^Klftjr wall i ; r " p . '» 
«il\.init'. |)(MtpaUl, 

AiMrcs". ti 1 1 »• r .■* mi l m iirv M 

r. .1 HctteiftK. 
n.>\ Ml, |"Wl tell »>•*. Pa. 



PHILA., MAY, 1800. 



American Federal in a of Labor. 
In only one way does the Federation 
ask Congress to interfere in regard to 
the introduction of machinery ; it 
demands a change in the present 
patent laws. A new invention, argue 
the majority of the Federation, should 
bring profit, first to the inventor, and 
then to the community as a whole : 
but our present patent system pro- 
motes monopoly by enabling a few 
capitalists to obtain exclusive control 
of an invention. The remedy proposed 
by the Federation is such a chang« in 
the patent laws that while the in- 
ventor is secured his reward, the use 
of the patented improvements are to 
be free to all. The Federation has 
failed to show, however, what form 
of law would accomplish this reform. 

Conciliation, and arbitration, so far 
as it is voluntary, are favored by the 
Federation as means of settling indus- 
trial disputes. Previous to i8yo the 
Federation gave this subject little 
attention, although It favored the law 
passed by Congress in (888 to facili- 
tate arbitration of disputes between 
workmen and employers on interstate 
railways. Compulsory arbitration in 
any form is vigorously opposed by the 
Federation, on the ground that the 
decision of the arbitrator might com- 
pel employees to work againat their 
will. The Federation has opposed 
the various railroad arbitration hills 
which have been considered by Con- 
gress since the Chicago strike of 1X93, 
including the bill which became law in 
May, 1898. This bill contained limiting 
clauses which gained for it the support 
of the five trade unions of railroad 
employees. The Federation feared, 
however, that the courts would so 
Interpret these clauses as to compel 
employees to work against their will. 
This it is thought would be especially 
likely to happen if the railroad cor- 
porations should make an agreement 
on the pait of the workmen to submit 
their disputes to arbitration a con- 
dition of employment. 

Although the Federation has de 
clared itself in favor of voluntary 
arbitration, a striking lack of enthusi- 
asm for arbitration even in this 
limited form is apparent. This luke- 
warmness, which is easily misinter- 
preted, is due to the fact that the 
workmen prefer the settlement of dis- 
putes, not by arbitration, but by con- 
ferences between the employer and a 
committee of workmen. The execu- 
tive council of the Federation is 
frequently successful in adjusting 
trade disputes by conferences with the 
employers. A strong trade union 



prefers to conduct its own CMC iatlu r 
than to submit the question to arbi- 
tration. I'nder the latter course, the 
CO&dutiofls under which its members 
shall work are determined by an out- 
sider;- -a principle which is peculiarly 
Obnoxious lo the Work men < Never- 
theless, when conferences have been 
tried and have proved unsuccessful, 
even strong trade unions favor arbi- 
tration as a last resort. 

To apprecir te the success of the 
Federation In securing labor legisla- 
tion one has only to consider how 
C mipletely the laws demanded by its 
Bnt convention in iSSj have been 
attained. This t_on vention demanded 
the enforcement of the national eight - 
hour law for government employe—, 
and the passage of national laws to 
permit the incorporation of trade 
unions, to protect American indus- 
try, and to exclude Chinese laborers, 
and foreign laborers brought to this 
country under contract, Every one 
of these demands was fulfilled before 
1886. Since that time the Federation 
has been active in securing, -to men- 
tion only the more important national 
laws— a series of amendments which 
greatly Increased the efficiency of the 
Chinese exclusion act and the alien 
contract labor act, the extension of 
the eight- hour law for government 
employees to letter-carriers and to the 
employees of government contractors, 
an act for the protection of the wages 
of seamen, an act prohibiting the con- 
tract system of onvict labor for con- 
victs in federal prisons, an act to 
facilitate arbitration on interstate rail- 
roads, an Bet to compel the use of 
automatic couplers on interstate rail- 
roads, and an act making Labor Day 
a legal holiday in the District of 
Columbia. While no single labor 
organization can claim exclusive 
credit for any one of these laws, the 
Federation has played a prominent 
and sometimes a decisive part in their 
attainment. 

During the last decade workmen 
have begun to chnfe under certain re- 
straints imposed by the government 
and constitution of the United States. 
At present a national law to forbid 
the employment of children under 
fourteen in factories, mines, or shops, 
or to fix uniform hours of work even 
for women and children would be 
unconstitutional. The Federation 
favors an amendment to the constitu- 
tion, such as was proposed in the recent 
Lovering bill to permit Congress to 
fix the hours of labor for women and 
children throughout the United States. 
The fact that a considerable amount 
of labor legislation has been declared 
unconstitutional by the courts led 
the Federation, in 1897, to demand 
amendments to the constitutions of 
the United States and of the several 
states to deprive the courts of power 
to eet sside 11 laws duly enacted by 
the people." For the most part, how- 
ever, the working class share in the 
prevalent reverence for the constitu- 
tion of the United States. 

The use of militia or of United 
States troops *o keep order during 
strikes, and above all the increasing 
use of injunctions as a means of inter- 
ference In labor disputes have resulted, 
in the minds of the workmen, in a 
widespread and deep distrust of the 
government, and especially of the 



courts. This distrust, to an extent 
unknown in the United States before, 
is shown by a number of resolutions 
of protest recently passed by the 
American Federation of Labor. Al- 
though workmen have alway-i disliked 
the use of troops to keep order during 
strikes, the strongest resolution passed 
by the Federation on this Subject be- 
fore 1 896 went no further than to urge 
that officers of the militia aluuld be 
men friendly to the working dosses. 
A resolution proposed in the onven- 
tion of 1896, however, recomiu tided 
trade unions to discourage the dilist 
ment of their meml>ers in the state 
national guard This resolutioi was 
adopted by the convention in jqUe of 
the opposition of the committee to 
which it was referred. 

The Federation has always favued 
the repeal of the so-called conspiracy 
laws. that is, " all taws whose olject 
is to deny to working people the free 
exercise of their rights to organize 
and be represented by committees or 
agents of their own selection in deal ■ 
ing with employers of labor in relation 
to matters of wages or other conditions 
under which labor shall be performed. " 
Thus the Federation demands an 
amendment to the Sherman anti trust 
law, to exempt trade unions from the 
provision that combinations in re- 
straint of inter-state trade are illegal. 

The trade unionist s distrust of the 
government centers in his oppositio'- 
to ** court-made law," by which it 
means the recent exten*-'.' ( 
both mandatory and .. g *j 
junctions by court* o • t> I 
means of interfering .n labor . Af,i,te?< 
lie feels thai I far revelling ciang* 1 :n 
the law has I en ead« n-jt by Con- 
gress, but by a R w Udges, This, feel- 
ing of distrust 1 heighl -r-H by k 

suspicion Of th* mOtiVCI O* lb* j.n -eg, 

who, trade unioni.-n ~bat;re, h e 
favored the employer at the eipens- 
of the workman. Th- me-rienn 
Federation of Labor prop at sgsittSt 
interference by the courts r. Ktrike . 
where no destruction of proper; or 
loss of life is occasioned 1/ the 
strikers, and requests Congress to set 
a limit to the use of injunctions. As 
yet no law on thi.i subject has been 
passed, although three bills have been 
considered by Congress. One, pro- 
viding that officers of organizations of 
labor, in the performance of their 
duties, shall not be subject to injunc 
tion proceeds >s, passed the Senate in 
i8'/i. Another, which passed the 
Senate in 1897, provided for trial by 
jury in contempt proceedings for vio- 
lation of an injunction. The third 
bill, which was introduced in the 
Senate in 1896, was most satisfactory 
to the Federation. The provisions of 
this bill made it unb vful for any court 
to issue a restraining order against 
any labor organization, its officers or 
members, in any manner 1 fleeting 
their full freedom peacefully to quit the 
service of any person or corporation 
at any time. 

This is not the place to discuss how 
far the courts have given the workmen 
just ground for suspicion. The wis- 
dom of the recent use of the injunction 
In labor dispute -at best a remedy 
of doubtful efficacy— is open to serious 
question, however, on the broader 
ground of public policy. Want of 
confidence in our government among 

• I 



a large class of the community, were 
it .dlowed to become permanent, miglit 
prove a grave- danger to democrat e 

Institutions. 

The preceding discussion of (J ,. 
activity of the American Federation 

of I. abut in securing state Interference 

in the form of labor legislation su 
gestS the questions Of the relation of 
the Federation to political parties ai ! 
to socialism. The Federation ti 
constantly refused to commit itself to 
any political party. There is an obvi 
ous distinction between this speeisl 
form of political action and jM.litu.,: 
action in the sense- nf the promotion 
of any legislation which the work 11 ,■ 
class desire. The Federation, standing 
not for political but for Industrial 
unity, takes the same j>osition in r> 
gard to current jwilitical question! 
any other business organization. t 
recommends Us members to cast thtii 
votes, independently of party, for the 
candidate who is most likely to pro- 
mote their Inter****. Twice, however, 
the Federation has. by Implication, 
given Its support to n political part'. 
The platform adopted by the first con 
mention in [881 contained a plank in 
f*vor of ■• full protection to American 
Isdustry, " but the next convention 

shttOSt unanimously repealed this pro- 
vision, and issued a manifesto d 
co mtenancing political action by 
trade unions. As earlv an tHtjj the 
Feleration declared itself in favor ol 
he free coinage of silver at the rat 
*»f sixteen to one. When in 1896 the 
■t*»ion of free coinage bec.»me t 
• a», !y de lined party issue, the Ked< 1 
a reaffirmed Its position, with the 
t, -tali ft cation that it did "not in any 
('■g-ee endorse any political party 
t it may have made free coinage 11 
p rti.ssn political question " 

Sloes ; S.y,, some S'lcialiat members of 
tt? A met! can Federation of Ubofhave 
vr-rVed p?r.*t*tent1y to secure its sup- 
port fir the principle of socialism, and 
for th.- St*i*list Ubor party. The 
reaul ing debates in the convention. 
Of 1890 and ifn*, wnirb are printed 
in mil give <n excellent idea of tin 
atttude of -^nl- union workmen 
to* <rd socialism. In (89 'he discus - 
■ior turned on the »ropose tdmisslon 
of 1 branch of Uu Sot»«Ii^» Labot 
pary to membe rship it ne Ptu „-rs: ion 
Uy a more thai, ihice quarters vr .e. 
t Federation decided to adher*- o 
the principle whieJ it had alway 
mvrtainert. that it was sr. or. uUa 
tlor exclusively jf trade nioniett 
an/1 refused to admit socithn otgaul 
KSttHM as such. Individual *Hah^ 
wh» are also members of trade uaian . 
are never discriminated against. 

In little FederaHot more Iteffr 
ivel» refused to r It 

soctalism. The ft ■ > 
urgd the convention 1- , ■ . 
poliilcal program win t I 
adorted by the ur,us*;*' dot' 
Britsh Trade Union _'ong. , $ 

A najority of the detegftUS to W 
Federation conven*' refused, how 
ever to endorse the ,sc 1 d' \\.\e. seeti>" 
ot tils program, w . r.,p<j#cd W 
col.etive ownerohip U> tfeii j>e d 
all Means of produc' ana dJatiibn 
tion:' Two distinct sigumentu in 
fluetred this vote. Ob« se< tlrn Ol 
tradi unionists oppose soculism in 
any o*m and feel that the power* of 
(Continued on ne.fi /^..j 



THE CARPENTER. 



9 



General Officers 

II I UK 

United Brotherhood of Carpenters and 
JoinerH of America. 

( iffioe of tlic < tatcral Secretary, 
Um4«m«i liinJiiiiik'. Hattatfriyaia, r*. 



'•ni'i.ii f*reM'l*nl loim William*, I 
s V 

r'.rneial He. i et,.rs Trt . urer f ) Mi.' ■ vi 
I i i II.. » - -i Pbil I :< Iphm. !■ i 

•'.IM | M '.111 I , : I > I - 

I ,T.t \ I » I'-- i 'r„l W |> II. i ■ et •', Wavrtly 
.1 \ nk'.s. *, \ 

B**4M4 liif l-i-.i V.n 'Allium NHCI -' M 

H IVk »i . Cm. ago, ill 

Ct.MI.4l4i Km ettvi i*. i.. 

(Alt r iir»; niirni. I I t » li I I!. Ml :st hf 
iiimlfit (O 111' c'.enrr.i! s. otrtmv lifuMi'rt 

iitti" U i if • \\ :. r . «: '>>« v.ith. N V 

I k Miller. I ,.V Wa hlngl : I ..Vf -! Mo 

t I . i .tlrrniull. 'UUI tf w-Dl -I Mi I' CntcigO 

i if. i i w»i. i tK Broad »i Itftftfofd 1 , I .un 

\» J Wi.lnm. |1 Mttll II M ■• filn ' ' 



American I ederatlon of l-abur. 

(i' ntinu< /.J 

government ahouldrsthei t it restricted 
than Incteaaed, A considerable auni- 
bet of lieli'^.ito. who believed nmn- or 
leas vaguely m the principle ofsocial- 
l.sin, aavertbeleM waled agaiaat its 

endorsement by the l"ederat...n un 
opportoaist grounds. Sevtral trade 
unions had thr. .it< ned to secede from 
th« Federation if it considered Buch 
■ •) neat ions of t s,K.itilative character." 
and these delegate! felt that, in the 
prtrsent staff of the Americ.in lahor 
movenien*., the preservation of a united 
trade unionism was of the fitat iru- 
portam «- 



Sir Henry Bessemer. 



Pad K ett'j» Breezy l etter 



Unity Is Strength. 



Bessemer conceived the idea of stir- 
ring up molten iron with air for 
oxidising the carbon present. The 
project whs read to the Hrittfh Asso- 
ciation and considered visionary. The 
dirureditid inventor established works 
at Sheffield to work out the process, 
and soon produced Hessuuer steel at 
a price £ 20 per ton lower than any 
other steel. After this followed 
recognition and honor*. He was 
elected to the Koyal Society in 1879, 
and was knighted. He died in 
wealthy, and fu 1 of honors. 



••Tennyson's "Queen of the May," 
Up to Pate. 



Hrejisre the nui'lstd I>1 tflli "i -tbei . * must ird 

hath likewise, 
Pot chill the wyail Mow* 11' "K'l the MM i* 

■hilling In tl.r »kies ; 
Anrt ihl* fires » very thin, no shawl ft round 

mm rolled, 

I know Itml wl ilr the spoil goe* 011 I'll rnl.h 

mi v dentil ot colli. 
My new kid '"ipir*. toi. are Ihlu, iillhnugh 

they look *o *weet, 
And. dancing 'mting the iWy gift**, 1 know 

I'll wet my feet ; 
But I'm to be gueen of the May mother, I'm 

to be ytletn "t the May, 
Bo make the tnusiard piasters Hat to 



You have seen fallows »,et so 
husy talking about thcinselv ,s that 
they would forget what they started 
out to do t Now, I am not alluding 
to you and I wouldn't for the world 
have you think I am one of 'em. 

Gtteat I would tiy it this way, refer- 
ring to J H 's sketch, with some 
a Me 1 Uses and letters of my own. C, 
D i ik r i. shows the inside ca^in^ of 
box ; A, B, the jamb in position, set 
f,ir enough from I) to receive the 
folded blinds. A, H, gives width of 
jamb, say i inches, also of sollit. 
Having made the sotlit the width A, 
J.:, and beveled the inside edge, as 
Bj K, lay ofl the board as in h'ig 2. 
The oblique line K, P, gives the cut 
across the board, To gain the jamb 
into the sotfit or . ;tt ui gau^e the 
desired depth from I; toward K 1-ig. 1. 
The tryvjuare? applied to beveled <dge 
B, E, gives all the edge cut required 
for the gaining. 

This, of course, is a " hopper 
problem," but it isn't necessary to 
monkey with the diagrams in such 
cases made and provided by hooks on 
carpentry. I say " monkey.' because 
1 never s*w the whys given with such 
diagrams : therefore never understood 
them but dropped them early in life 
and evolved a system of " equivalent 
bevels on my own hook. Did you 
ever ti> dovetailing such a hopiK-T ? 
Before me is one that I dovetailed 
some yeats ago, the only carpenter- 
niadeone I ever saw. Very interesting, 
particularly if. as 1 did, the edges are 
left squire instead of being bevel' d 
like B B, Pig. I. 



Mechanical Instruction at Home. 



Information Wanted. 

If any brother, of the Biotherhood 
of Carpenters and Joiners of America, 
can give any information as to the 
whereabouts of JOHAffAB Klein, a 
native of Watdenbuch, C.erruany, at 
one time a member of former Cabinet- 
makers t nion No. 7, of New York 
city, kindly send said information or 
address to William Ruchle, 161 West 
32a street, or to S. Kaehl, 224 First 
avenue, New York city. Financial 
Secretary of Local t nion No. 309, 
Very important family affairs require 
thii information. 



Why hr„fl mrburlc «n<1 give the enemy 

A choice of m . re ofTrnce? 
II is th» keenest %*nsi- of stmUgrm 

That Hives un r'.-..oiiiijens». 

Then lorwai ! nurrh ' by honest reckoninv 

l» e'll Mint- the bold ilisplftv. 
And ttiil* .legrs.U Ihf li.jpr* ftfld obstacle 

Now thrown aero** our way. 

AIohi !h»- rftskft ii-sert oui dignity 

By holdiag h»le aloof 
We'll manife-l to all ne>oiul leumach 

Ou) l .»e is a;nj,li proof. 



A '. tilted ni t will bear us some reward 
From » 1 1 111 whom j.isiice knows, 

And for 1 lie r'sirlnt ilacefltj 
Is often wrenclietl from foes. 



A'e mu«t ftCCCpt « ;ilea of Lib. rty, 

AHd treil each rjuestion fair, 
To evt- r 1 11 h-r page, t.r battleinent- 

Knscr .11 ..nr knowle'l/e ther>-. 

V'ti le bin., e-iongh. through ledr ami p..veity 

Ben stultit I on our way. 
Why 1. it revert ■ .f b jss-s I tar lessly 

oemaml • craftsman «|ay ■ 

An 1 s.j replace v .linn brmnment 

",ir honored w-eping llig, 
\n.l to it ad. I a star so fittingly 
That cone may dare 10 lag 

Hut plain and hon- st moves in our recour-e 

Wc look f .r whit is due. 
And beidlt stand the>e lasl.-d to principle, 

With purpote stsunch and true. 

lien- .th .jur shs'.'ered cau-> !.!n-ili Victoiy 

for lack of ample cheer 
Why Rill expose our views to ridicule, 

lly stimulating fear ( 

No Xi 1 be '.rart, our y>. is mauiies- 

It sriinea wi h p'4rp«j«e.to-j ; 
fhi be-<m» but radiate Imm unity. 

And couord lirm and true. 

J. .jin H l-'Al< «i i I 



Correspondence instruction in tech- 
nical subjects was instituted by The 
International Correspondence Schools 
of Scran tun, l'a . and its students and 
graduates, whii h now number more 
than 80,000, have ranked with, and 
in Boiue branches have surpassed, 
students and graduates of other tech- 
nical schools. They teach mechanical, 
electrical, pteam and civil engineer- 
ing, mechanical and architectural 
drawing. architecture, plumbing, 
Knglish blanches, bookkeeping, etc 
having more than fifty courses. 

Students may study at home, 
devoting such time as they can spare, 
ami the instructors are in constant 
communication with thtm through 
the mails These schools have been 
endorsed by leading engineers, and 
graduate! from them are always in 
demand. 



Submit to Arbitration. 



St'»lx<tP!KU>, 111., May 25.— The 
striking miners and mine owners of 
the Carbon dale district yesterday- 
agreed to submit the trouble to the 
State Board of Arbitration. The 
minera will return to work at once 
pending the decision of the ISoard. 



Iron Smoke-Pipe Through Roof. 



From •* Hurry Up," St. Louis, 

Sir -Please send me the sizes and 
outline of this hole: For iron bolltr 
pipe 16 inches in diameter; pitch of 
roof, '.o degrees. 




What the United Brotherhood Has 
Done. 



the United B-otherhood of C.rpenteifl and 
joiner* of America wr:s fnunded in Co" — nllon 
at Chicago, At-gnst 1J MM. At first it had ouly 
twelve local union* and '.'.1 1: members Now, in 
seventeen ye*rs. it has grown to number local 
Union* in ft>icilies, and has over r.,UK! enrolled 
members It is i.rgsnif d to prottrt the Carpen- 
ter Trade from the evils of low pi ices and botch- 
work , its ;ilm is to encourage a higher standard 
of skill and better wages ; to re-establish an 
Apprentice Sy-O m, and to aid and assist the 
Beaten by HNtaal protection and benevolent 
means: it pays a Wife funeral Rrnelit of from 
f'i'i to (V) ; a Members Fur.eral Itmetit, |!l)fl to 
f.'i", ; and h Disability itrnetit, . |Htl 10 | !'»». In 
thexc General He nt fits f u ,"i (XJtl have been « 
pended the past two years, an I !•">£< ~<»i since the 
year ]^<i. » hilt ftiM Ml nt re were spent in that 
period (or >ick He; elila by the local I'niona. 
This i- fiidv One ai. d a yuarter Million* nf Uol- 
larsexpended for benevolent and charitable pur- 
poses. Such an organieetion is worth the atten- 
tion of every Carpenter. The Itrothtrtiood la 
also a Protective Trade I'nion aa well aa a 
Benevolent Society. It h as raised the wage* in 
hundrena of cl'ies, and placed lully F;ee and a 
Half Million Hollars more wages annually in 
the pockeisof the Carr-enters, in those citie*. It 
reduced the houta of labor to 8 hours a day in 
Wi cities, and 9 hours • day in four hun- 
dred and twenty-sii cities, not to -|) ik of 
many cities which have established the H and 9 
hour system 00 Saturdays. Hy this nieana 
II) HP more men have gained employment. 
This is the result of thorough organiza- 
tion. And yet very few strikes have occurred, 
and very bt.le me-uey has been spent on strikes 
by this s-ciety It is not a secret onth-lx>unrt 
organtiatkn. AH competent Carpentert are 
eltKiblt to Join, and ttai- card is an invitation to 
you as an intelligent mec*-f nic to send :n your 
application for membership in the Carpenter* 
Onion in your city. It is a branch of the 
Brotherhood, its dues are small in comparison 
with the benefits, and it la to your interest to 
pin this growing- and powerful body. 

Rules Regarding Apprentices. 



TMJJ COXYNE MITE 

Till' URKATB3T KITE ON KAKTI1 ok M A It's. 

I'll. .. ill [tkf Minis Hull! on si'leriilli,- i.riiiplplns 
Thfy li»veKf<ii iifiint pn«er Tney lntere-,1 in<> 
Pruirssur, Hiiiilrut. Viiiuli ( Iill.l It 1- .VI ini'i.es 
blitli, weigh-. 7 mi tiers !M H.le . filiLrk rtft 1 lull), vi-rv 
.1 i.nlile In a lair 1ireez(> will reach J,e.*l r.e'l 
jiltliinii' at mure lima M day Free lun run M'lni ud 
tint;- >'t du> sn.l lunieriis In iimhl. All remlv In 
f "eh n ■ to Un- 1 o lull 1'ut up In 11111III11. nil..- 
t'mv by iiiH.ll, |m-i|uilJ. (*uta 1,i*ju feet lii.eti 
lli.c. imsiyald, 3i. cents. l*»r di.r.eti u> ei press |.t Ml 

Silas J. Cosyna, 637 Humboldt St. .Chicago. 

^.^"^''^^^'^''^^^^Bri^b^r^h^lnyiu^b 



At the Detroit Convention of the United Broth- 
erhood of Carpenters and Joiners ol America, 
held August rt- II , IW, the following rules in rela- 
tion to apprentices were approved. and the Local 
Unions are urged to secure their enforcement: 

Wkrreas, The rapid influx of unskilled and In- 
competent men in the carpenter trade has had 
of late years, a very decreasing and injurious 
effect upon the mechanics in the business, end 
has a tendency to degrade the standard of skill 
and to give no encouragement to young men to 
become apprentices and to master the trade 
thoroughly ; therefore, in the beat Interest* of 
the era ft. we declare ourselves in favor of the fol- 
lowing rule* : 

Ruction L The indenturing of apprentice* ia 
the best means calculated to give that efficiency 
which it is desirable a carpenter should possess, 
and also to give the necessary guarantee to the 
employers that aome return will be made to them 
for a proper effort to turn out competent work- 
men : therefore, we direct that all Local Uniona 
under our jurisdiction shall use every possible 
means, wherever practical, to introduce the sys- 
tem of indenturing apprentices, 

Sm: 2. Any boy or person r rretiter engaging 
himself to learn the trade 1 1 carpentry, shall be 
reijuired to aerve a regular »pprenticeshlp ot 
four consecutive years, and shall not be consid- 
ered* journeyman unless he has complied with 
tin- rule, and is twenty-one year* ct nge at the 
completion of hi* apprenticeship. 

Skc. S, All boys entering the carpenter trade 
with the Intention of tear uing the business shall 
be held by agreement. Indenture or written eon 
tract for s term of four year*. 

Si!C. \. When a boy shall have contracted with 
an employer to serve a certain term of years, he 
shall, on no pretense whatever, leave aaid em- 
ployer and contract with another, without the 
full and free consent of said first employer, 
unlesa there is just cause or that such rti-inge fa 
made in consequence of the death or relinquish- 
ment of business by the first emnloyrr ; any ap- 
prentice so leaving shall not be permitted tj 
work under the jurisdiction of any Local Tnion 
in our Brotherhood, but shal! be required to re- 
turn to his employer and serve out his appren- 



Sue. f>, It I* t , ijoined upon eat h Local Onion 
to make regulations limiting the number of ap- 
prentices to be employed in each ahop or mill to 
one for such number of journeymen aa may 
seem to thrm just ; and all Onions are recom- 
mended to admit to membership apprentices In 
Ihe last year of their apprenticeship, to the end 
that, upon the expiration of their terms of ap- 
prenticeshtp they may become acquainted 1 
the workings of the Colon, and he bctU 
to appreciate its privileges and obligations 1 
■Huntiog full membership. 



10 



Rule tor Tapering Shafts. 



I do not altogether grasp "Un- 
known's " query in this matter owing 
perhaps to my tenseness, but it Fi t ms 
to me that the rule lie asks /or is one 
in Solid mensuration, not in practical 
geometry. I olVer the following 
which may aid him, for having the 
solid contents it will he an easy 
matter for him to niakeMieh divisions 
as his particular case may demand, 
First, I give a few of the properties 
of the pyramid, which is, as all school 
boys know, very similar to the cone 
All pyramids and cones standing on 
the same base, and having the same 
altitude, we demonstrated to be equal 

A triangular pyramid is the third 
part of a prism standing on the same 
base and having the same base and 
the same altitude. 

Hence, every multangular may be 
divided into triangulars, every pyra- 
mid is a third part of a prism stand- 
ing on the same basis and having the 
same altitude. 

If a pyramid be cut by a plane 
parallel to its base, the section will be 
similar to the base. All pyramids, 
prisms, cylinders, etc., are in a ratio 
compounded of their bases and alti- 
tudes ; the bases, therefore, being 
equai they are in proportion to their 
altitudes, and the altitudes being 
equal, they are in proportion to their 
basis. 

Similar pyramids, prisms, cylin- 
ders, cones, etc , are in a triplicate 
ratio of the homologous sides. 

Equal pyramids, etc , reciprocate 
their bases and altitudes, i, e , the 
altitude of the one is to that of the 
other, as the base of one is to the base 
or the other. 

A sphere is equal to a pyramid 
whose base is equal to the surface 
and its height to the radius of the 
here. 

From the foregoing properties we 
obtain the following rules for the 
finding the solid contents and surface 
measurement of a pyramid. 

Rule for the Solids —Find the solid 
ity of a prism that has the same base 
and height with the given pyramid ; 
divide this by three and the quotient 
will be the solidity of the pyramid. 
Or multiply the base by the perpen- 
dicular height and one-third of the 
product will be the content. 

Rule for the Surfate. This is ob- 
tained by fin-3'ng the areas of the base 
and of the lateral triangles. The sum 
Of these is the area of the pyramid. 
The external surface of a right pyra- 
mid, standing on a regular polygonal 
base, is equal to the altitude of one of 
the triangles which compose it, mul- 
tiplied by the circumference of the 
base of the pyramid. 

Rule jor Finding the Solidify of the 
Frustrum of a Pyramid. To the areas 
of the two ends of the fruetrum add 
the square root of their product j and 
this sum, multiplied by one third of 
the perpendicular height, will give 
the solid contents. 

This last rule holds equally true to 
a pyramid of any form. For the solid- 
ities of pyramids are equal when they 
have equal heights and bases, what- 
ever be the figure of their bases. 

I trust H Unknown " will be able to 
extract from the foregoing, the full 
quantum of his requirements, if not, 



1 shall be' pleased to convey to him 
such other knowledge I may piississ 
regarding the properties of the pyra- 
mid. 

Fki:i>. T. Hop. .son. 

Cut of Valley or Hip Knlters Where 
Set or F'ate. 

Mr. Fditor : In all the bonks on 
framing that I have, Including " Roof 
Framing Made Fasy, " by Maginnis, 
" The I'se of Steel Square," and One 
or two others, I fail to find anything 
which gives any information regard- 
ing the cut of valley or hip rafters 
where it sets on plate that is, if the 
common rafter shoulder is cut ; inches 
from top edge of rafter BOW much 
should the valley or hip rat ter be cut ? 
If it is cut the same as a common raf- 
ter, the hip when it sets on trie angle 
is liable to be too high and the valley 
when se' to lit close into inn'-r an^Ie 
will be too low. Should like to gel 
any information you can render 
through your columns I sign inv- 
self. 

\ V / 

South A/an kesttt, I 

To A. F. and Farl Pa,' sett. 

From Johnn'e Hull, S I. 

Answering A F.'s inqu'ry in Feb- 
ruary Cartkntkh and the way he 
mentions of drilling the joints with a 
sharp none drill or chisel, Rosen d ale 
cement joints sre not so hard, but the 
best method is to get the masons to 
build in blocks to nail or screw to I 
was sorry, you know, that Fa 1 
I'adgett considered I hit his feelings, 
but from what I can read from Irs 
script we are countrymen born and if 
1 flattered him he pot no more than 
his tendc years deserved, so that he 
need not pose frr sympathy nor 
belittle his own attainments, for his 
letters are a pleasure to read As to 
the Maginnis articles, while they are 
not far behind standard authors, they 
are present American practice. Mr. 
Wools* articles are first rat • and so 
are Mr. Hodgson's, but, oh. Lord, 
where are the letters from tie men, 
the men who work, who are day by- 
day in the business *nd know a 1 its 
detail, its cares, its trials, its 
pleasures and its triumphs > Wht re 
are the notes frrm the splendid body 
of highly skilled cabinetmakers and 
woodworkers, some of whom would 
put our gifted English carpenters and 
carvers of the tuedi t val age far in the 
shade? Some of them I know 
personally, but they work from detail 
and. a'as for us all their interest in 
it dies with the last wail of the s 
o'clock whistle. If this is not true, 
then I must only conclude that, like 
all skilled carpenters, they treasure 
their skill and knowledge lest its 
publication might provoke a new 
competitor to lessen its value to the 
possessor. Karl, my son, your state- 
ments are good and true, but men 
differ, and the r est rr-echanFs are not 
always the best talkers, writers nor 
thinkers. In conclusion, therefore, 
let me encourage all of the Union's 
brothers to write to the Editor any. 
thing on paper that can be tead, that 
is the stufl we want. The editor will 
put it in shape and surely, as I<ord 
Byron, the poet, once said: "It is 
pleasant to see one's name in print." 



A fienty to ,1. W. lirown in February 
Carpenter. 



Fnder the heading " Recent Fcono- 
Otic Changes." Bro, I W. Frown ot 

Union ; ;. tint t ford, Conn, speaks 
despairingly <>f Union ; >. in his par- 
ticular reft rence ton smoker tin \ held, 

date not given, it will be taken for 

granted, that Fro. Frown refers to 
the one givtn by our I. oral J .Miliary , 
at which our esteemed Urotlui was an 
able Contributor. At the muting in 

question, the first part of the literaty 

programme was opened as follows I 
committee distributed Blip* of paper, 
on which each rmmUr was requested 

to write a question fot discussion, 

after which the slips were CotUcted, 
plated in a hat, and, starting on the 
lirst one theeoniuiH!. t passed the Fat , 
out of which a Brothel drew a slip 
which was handed to the Chair and 
the name of the Brother announced, 
with a request that he sptak on the 
question, each one complying by rising 

and speaking or declining as the 
question may or may not ha-e been 
within his knowledge. 

After all had been heard froi.i the 
second literary part was then opened 
and consisted particularly in the dis- 
play of elocutionary attainments. 
There was some dancing and about 
eleven o'clock the meeting adjourned, 
after a wry Successful meeting. 

Hro. Brnwn portrays In marked 
comparison the talent of Local to 
that of the brick mesons. The latter 
were none other thsi the B, I. and 
M. I '. delegates, consisting of t$$ 
picked men, representing all section* 
of the Fnited States and Canada. We 
should all unite 'n agreeing that they 
were as brilliant as described; it is 
none too strong for the delegates 
deserved it all and more. 

Let us hope that those illustrious 
sons of toil shall live long to divsem 
inate to their fellow-men the beneti 
cent results of trade unionism, and 
that the beacon light of intellect thty 
possess will be used to light the way 
to one grand unification of the lair- 
ing classes, united, not with swords 
and armor buckled on as of old nor in 
the more advanced or refined way of 
the nineteenth century, that wher the 
bugle sounds the sharp crack of 
modern musketry or thf boom fJ f the 
latest guns will plunge us in the 
fierce throes of savage war, but let us 
unite in a hettt r cause and help to 
bring about conditions that wUl not 
call for the spiking of any gun, but 
ever bearing in mind the beautiful 
words of Longfellow : 
'Were half the power that lills the 

world with terror. 
Were half the wealth bestowed on 

camps and courts, 
Given to redeem the human mind 

from error, 
There'd be no need of arsenals or 

forts." 

In reference to the harsh criticism 
of 43 by our beloved Brother, I will 
say at our open meetings the greatest 
possible liberty, consistent with good 
order is granted to all. 

If someone dug up the records of 
the past, it is because it is a privi- 
lege he enjoys at our open meetings, 
"The right of free speech." We lave 
hope for the future of mankind and 
we believe that the "monstrous 



macblm " so designated In Tin 

C\l;. i NT! R will yet be csed by lab.ii 
as a pillow to light* n Ihcii blttdi ns it 
toil So, the heaven of out desire 
dots not dip so far down below the 
horizon. Wt will do our pert to 
sound the glad tiding to your eni t>. 

break it to your hope. Oui desire la 
that bro Brown be ltt,n t ody by his 
presence st oui meetings in the future 
than he has been in the past, i .i by 
van deeds shall ye be known, nad 

to you who sndt) turn aside sad weep 
foi our weakness, it might be said 
wo ,u l will be always acceptable, 
Tii'.-. Huijcv, 

//.tilt »«/, i'U'1. 

ItttStl Wiirk. 

From I ti jtra< t» N V 

Editor i o. k.n 1 1 i Will tin r< 
never be an end to tin tetrible d« 
mands placed on carpenters foi more 
work, more work. Flu- lutnpcr ii in 

this town now war.t i tilings a 

day set ami nailed, fort) white wood 

doors fitted am! so on, and there is 
little or no work in the flat • any im re 
In f.ut the Only work a i arpent« t > in 
g-t a living at is repairs an 1 altera- 
tions in tnts town Suretj time* are 

sorely changed. 
Weight* Placed on Brick Wafts, 

From W. 1 1 I. . N. w V ork. 

The wnght of wall pel foot in 
height of wall is as follows 

s m. brick wall, weight per ft lbs 

16 

>o ... 

Frown Stone, : mi lie.. - ;„, rinds, 

s. ,, 4 

Granite • pei fa t 

White marble . - . 

If this weight is not tqaelly lis 
tribnted, double it 

Should tt sustain a chltnne) ot 
other weight add the additional 
weight in all i ones 

Deduct for windows only hail 
weight: that is. tike out of the 

weight imposed on beam, lintel ot 

girder, but hall the actual space 
which the windows will or, upy 

SOTR, Should a pier re.st on Of 

about the middle of beam, lintel or 

girder, the weight must not be con- 
sidered t» Ik- equally distributed in 
computing the weight of ■ brieh etch, 

estimate a ; inch arch as rqUal in 
weight to an > im Ii thick wall, and 
an R inch arch as equal in nrcighl to 
a I.- inch thick wall, on a Straight 
line This additional weight is to 
make allowance for the weight of 
material requited to till up on a level 
with the crown of the an h. Make 
allowance for any material placed 
above the crow n of the arch, 
Bof tenement house, compute the 
weight pei ft. BOOT surface loolbs 
Dry goods house . JtO " 

flour store .... ,vso " 
Public assemblies . i*o •• 

koof, including snow 90 ** 

I lard ware store from 350 to 600 " 
l or cast-iron arch beams or girders 
with wrought-iron tension rods, cal- 
culate the maximum strain w hen the 
pressure of weight of test is applied 
on the middle Ol beam or girder, not 
to exceed five tons per square inch of 
tension rod, or equal to ten tons dis- 
tributed. 



THE CARPENTER. 



11 



I mm <>"r London Corra* pun dent 

: tv' before tirade uni-ms wen- legal- 

; ! A.ssociatiooa, little hucietiea of 
r utcrs ami joiners began lo be 
furnied wcretlyia the west of Kng' 

; \. 'J'lie rising of tin.- tattit uli.lt, \ 

-u I tin- trifotemu •>( Kiaoce, ami tbe 
• ny days that thert marked 

snfall (if tin- long Hrchaic fetid*] 
:n hid net all the forces of weal' h 
id ■ and influence in frightened an 
1 1 1 mii to tlu- working c)a*SS* 

•, a Ii»t« . and the laws of coospir- 
turned tvery combination of the 

■tarians into • 1 Hssnriations of 

factor*. When the terror ended 
tlu- decapitation <>( Kobeapverre 
• the Napoleonic nightmare 
i;ipervened ami the laws directed 

,i r..si the Working class became 

:■ re severe still men i rept in secret 
to theft Meeting*, anil lodge* were 
foi ted sporadically all over the 
f in try. Wage* of skilled mechanic* 
w • often no higher than 5 per 
week, ami bread was forty cent* pet 
teal Suck things made organization 
« ntceaaity. 

fr»J tin- repe*lol tin . onsjjiracy 

laws made trade unioniam, a.s we 

st: H :t. puistble, ,tn.l the result that 

i | erticttlarl) concerns the readers 
ol this papet is that it Kit the way 
°. ■ foi an open oomh;riRtion of the. K e 
K*tter*d lodge*. Thus in :-.-7 the 
tVeaeral Unto* <>f Carpcater* ancl 
joiners came into existence, liven in 

ih'--<- early days tin m iced depend" 
toes of wage* upon combination w*i 

lOOST* «xtrcnuly prominent. Where 
then- was no org*ni/4ltion wa>ji:S rc- 

naioed at the level I have before 
DKnttoned, but when- there were 

bran, lies of the union wa^-s had 
rlgeo to p and The earliest 

bnmche* in London are believed In 
havr'^tn founded herein iSjS, 

The earlier RlCtobership total, of 
whii h I know, is h>r it j ; when 
the ttettcr*] Union registered near.. 

thn-f thousand members The next 

fen ><ars showed an extraordinary 
and phenomenal increase, reaching a 

record total of ; | . S 1 1 in : s ■ ;- All 
the 6gutes !<>r this ye*l are trv 
steadotts Nearly aa much was paid 
in strike pav in that one year aa has 
ittogether been paid in the twenty 
rein since The out of-work pay for 
*7J was f 1 1 . « i 

I*y r.tjy a retrogressive triult nry 
J*Kan t<i make itself evident The 
Bwmberahip had sunk t" - and the 
«H ni work pa\ for the yt.ir lost- to 

Ike abnormal amount of <•>■ \<m e* 

actly one sixth of the total amount o! 
BUI of work pay expended in the last 
thirty three years. 

The decline, once set in, took place 
as vigorously a.s the increase had 
'lone. Perpetual and heavy dinrnu 
•ion of niemherahip went on until 

"> > \ when the roll only covered i *.m 
craftsmen. The strike pay for that 
r**t was sixty- five dollars ami ihe 
out of-work hem lit wli^htly over five 
thousand. 

Since then the position has Im- 
proved, slowly, Steadily and surely, 
year by year, until, according to the 
return furnished by Mr. Matkin for 
l>eceniber, r.898, the membership Is 
6,796— a* increase of over 600 upon 
the i,s<j7 figures. The cash balance 
18 over thirty eight thousand dollars, 



an increase of nearly ten thousand 
dollars over the 1897 total. As the 
cash balance in 1,.: was only six 
thousand dollars, it can he easilv seen 
that the union has had a lot to con- 
tend against, and is pulling through 
the hard times with splendid pluck 
and perseverance. 

"<!'• of the important factors, no 

doubt, in the betterment of the 

society's position is the organizer, 
C. Matkin. He travels the country 

continually, strengthening existing 

branches and organi/.ing new ones, 
l-'o. the past few months he has been 
working through Cambridgeshire, 
Huntingdonshire, Norfolk, Suffolk 
and the neighboring counties, and 
has added a number of vigorous young 
h tig** to the roll of the organization. 
Pot his labors he receives tifteen dol- 
lars a week, and ear ns every cent of it. 

William Matkin, the general store 
tary of the union, has served his 
society for many >.-ars, and is greatly 
respected by all the members. He 
lives in Liverpool, and. in 1890, when 
the Annual British Trade Unions" 
Congress met in that city, he was 
unanimously 1 hosen president by th- 
convention The rultrshipof a con 
gress of several hundred delegates 

(there were ; : : present, representing 
1 170,191 trade unionists; is a labo, 
of no mean difficulty, but Jiro. Mat- 
kin acquitted himself well, and re- 
ceived a unanimous vote of thanks 
flOM the delegates. This was one 01 
the most exciting congresses known, 
personal feeling Tan terribly high, 
and such i|U«*tlons as the legal enact 
ment of an eight hour day were 
under discussion That was a 1 onho- 
. >>.'ij/ 'juestion for British trade- 
unionists in I Sy ,. 

He is heart and soul in favor of all 
lra*'es federation, but would sooner 
see S general federation based upon 
fedei.it ion of cognate trades and not 
upon direct membership of individual 
unions. 

The state of employment amongst 
carpenters and joiners is only mode- 
rate in the north of Kngland, but im- 
proving as you come south Employ- 
ment in London is excellent for all 
branches of the building trades just 

now. 



•• Alien Mm Irov* Ike cattle home, 

a, rasm ih< Aowt ■ v >.<. 

Ihe karlttghl HOua* »t-re atrand-d aa I« 

rp'it ■ sSlntmi rots *ea 

' \ 1 M.itv Hgl onr Ittllr call 

1 an Pol itnr,'- thovah aS* 

Atat lir worr « HSM *un, 
\i 1! 1,11 I i o -.vslkc.l lir 



Al l. .HKCHAMtS WHO USE TOOLS 

Carprster*, Mill Mcn suir Bvildera, CabiMI 

Maker*, Ctopm tW., arr uiuicui tcMMOOfed 
Li t ..viiii- Hieif 

TOOLS NTOI.KN OK MlSl'LU V,U 

lait the IHtei iSoci ttOl wiint (90la lliitt nr- 
Indelibly timiVrd »ilh Ihr nwurrs tiMiiie «n<! 
atldtraa. I hi*. m.iy ba aSail* tod quukly dour 
by u>ing 

KKNYOS'S ETCMISfl OOafPOVSO 

I .jt wtUiiik ill dntwlni uteri or iioo. 
Sll|<-Oul I.,. I nallir Mullll> h» > • ll inn Hll'l your 

addtena No. ol Loco), rrwaid oitered, 01 any 
oihei Informatioa tsiiea «uh mucli accur- 
acy ami prrcisu 11 a*, van c«u wrii> 011 h sheet of 
while i>njir., riti l in ynur own hand wiiontt, 
nuikiMK llir UtenUScaliua comnlur, and Ihe 
nanir unm.niiiiHt.1r by a urcund p«rly. a* Isolien 
ilotir in rune nt Il0l< 11 lOOli 

Ihe conii.niiii.l i» » foi J>1»- colored lluld. cut 
nil 111 two ounte t«.>tll<*. with lull di ml Ion* on 
rarh lioitle. Ilwill not ral hole* tticl.'l IdiiK nor 
Inuite Ihe hnnd* !*•! t'ottle. J 1 eta. l ei do/rn 
liulllc*. I- m, i.irvald 1 do mil nell l<*« Hihii 
one doren I.ibeial imlm ' metilii to 1ue»l a K e"t». 

L'.fI temiotldrme nulirlted. 




(/nicr hons undr> (kit htadcost ten cents a tt*t.) 



PW v, Ft. V.. March I. 
VllMUt, The A mtgtlty Kuler of the t'ni- 
verin: h«* he n (.La-eii to call ui.on this I'nion, 
and hi* tnkeii Itr.m us onr of our ol<1ml and 
■Oat wuiliiy tirtlhrrn 111 the p»r»on ot our late 
Brother THKOrnja K SOUK, who ha* heru flu aide 
find siiiveie workrt lor H-e bStt interest* of our 
I'nifin. 

WH OMI, Tllla t.'n'on deeply frel* the loss of 

>i* .'u ii.- r. 1 whem wr all texarded *• 

h all ■ aod ytatron mother and a laaUng 

frien,' cl DttlOBratn Then lore he it 

h'r'.iihrd. Thai thi* l iiion su.cerrly moinn^ 
hl| lo»< and Itial we drape our Charter for 
thirly i!ay* , thut »»>■ rxtend to thr bereaved 
fa mil v > f ' 11 r dCO&flatd bi other I lit M nCptM 10111 

of our ttmpatky, 

A', jo,': rd , That .1 copy of the»e rr*oluli ns t* 
uprraiJ upoi; the minute* of our >:•• -to v, 01 I 
cotiy of Ihr *^mr !,r presrnlrd lo ihe family of 
Ihe deceiaed brother, and a copy be »e..t 10 our 
orlici;.] j,,ariial for publication. 

GKOKG8 f- I.BIfKI.DT, 

UtWlS I.HWIS. 

WSt J. 1"NKS. 

C. ft. CarVHITB, ' 

WK.UAU A. WIl.I.UMs, K* Sit, 



I 



( iimmilirf 



CMIoM NO. UJ.BeiTK Mar. 11.; I*'-. 
K'HSB It has ideaatd the Ma»'.rr H.nldrr 
i,f ihr rmver** to rarooea from our rat.|*i 
Srothci m. cnaiii £, a worths iiumNr 

h t . rj That in the 'Irath of U M I .km I 
I'n on ItJ lam«.nt« the I..** A a brotln I v* hu tvat 
rvrr rr»dy lo pTi^fler the 1 and of kid and the 
I ice of »yiiipa'hy Ii< the nte ly an'l dUlftMOd, 
out wh'umii univer*ai friend and a true 
uvriKhl citiren. 

A> .,. id. I'bal lh'*e reaolutioni be Hpira.l 
u;. n :hr minutes nd a copy be neat lo 1 ur 
off.. ill organ. I MB CAftPBSTBtt. 

Vou: * fraternally. 
A. K KOsSl.OW, 



CMflHl 1*1, JOUBT, III . March S, I* " 

u in m a* 11 na* ple a ted the «trat Architect 

and Inn der of Ihe rnivt-r*r lo irraurt fri.m .ur 
niid*l cur lale and failhful brothrr. CuafcLi is A. 
U* Minni,, thriefure, lieu 

AVaarW, That in the death ot llrotner LCMt> 
BSao, LoCBl l* 11. "ii of Catpen era and Joineia 
ol Mr. erica, No. 1T1 laments the loaa of Brother 
LDXUBCBO who wa» ever ready 10 prcdrr ihe 
hand of a' ' and Ihe voice of sympathy to the 
n-edy in, dlatteBBtd, a Iricnd 10 all upright 
cit len* a duti..l.!c buabBttd an.! a kind and 
loving father. 

AV M at we utrnd our heaitfelt sym- 

pathy 10 the lelaliveain their attlictton and com- 
mend Ihrm t 1 *eek con-.. n of Hun the 
AttwiBS Kulrt for He ha* promised 10 care for 
ihe v* idow an-1 01 phaii*. 

hr < l;ed. That lhr*e revlul i .ua l*e *pn ad on 
thr mm ■!'■■' our Local I'nion a copy he *eut 
to the bereaved family, a copy 10 Tiik Cami'KN 
ikh, our citlictal juuiual .end a copy to the AV 
/ik '.'; an aud iVfB I for public itloll. 

" M BRIKNT, I ro,> AW. 

1 H 1 1 M a - PBNBMCTON 1 

0BO. MllIK, A',, . Sri . 



At blis. Texaa. Match 1. ISle.i. 

WMKBl \B It ha* pleased the gTCBt Architect 
ami Huildi 1 of :he fniverae to temoee liom our 
miilsl Bioihei (i. A smiv, , h, Uu-refore be ll 

Rtiolvfd, I'hat in Ihe death of ItrolherO. A. 
Si* alTCUBi I.ikhI In Ion IB* Carpeulera and 
Jiiinri* 'if America, tamrtilathe lo*a nf n faith- 
ful mettibrr and earnest supiioiter of unloninu. 

A>j.'/iW, That our heaitfelt synipalhy be ex- 
trtidr-.l to hla relative* tu their atlllcUon. 

Kr ol 'd. Tint our chuiter Lrdraprdfoi thirty 
days and thai Iheae rcachitiona he sjnead npou 
the record* of our Local I'nion and a copy lie 
>eut to our oA«i«1 ortian. Tiik Car I'K n rKR. 
f, GBOGItf. I 
T. p. OlVlK* 

C, H. I.KIIHN 1 



Committer, 



I rank lietiytm, 



V. St. Louis 111. 



UftlOM No, SS, hk anion, Pa.. January 1 1, IttaV. 

Wiikkkab, It BM pleased ihe Supreme Archi- 
tect ol thr I'nlverite to remove from our midst 
one of rui eattemed lhothera, Hhank Patthr 
>on, and 

Whkrhas, f,ocal I'nion No, SH) feela the lo-a 
or a faithful brother and an earnesl worker in 
our cauae. Therefore be it 

Kemiued, That we ainierely aympathiie wilh 
li'.a beteBTed brother and n-lativi*. 

AVir)/i*rf, That our Charier be draped in 
mourning fur a petlod of thirty dayi, a copy 
of these reauluiiom be apread on ©ur mlnulei 
and a copy be presenied lo Brother B. C. Pat- 
TRMaii*t, biother of the deceased ; be n further 

Kfiilvtd, 1 uat theae reaolullona be forwarded 



lo our official journal , T KB C 1 R I'ENTkr, and the 
iMt'f ii .... .' the official organ of thr EuildinjC 
Trade Council, for publication. 

O. II SIMMKNS, 1 
V.. V.. KA OPM AN, ( mm, lire. 
O. S 1.1'TZ, 1 
Adopted by Local No. .V..;. 
T. T. KI-HNH. Pmidtnb 

a s. i.v 1/. StenUtrf. 
tSmtnmVtt, ki.i/.ahkth. n. j., April i.iv.i 

At a regular rnrtiiiig ol I^cal Union No. bo. 
held on March '.IHh, the followine reaoluinms 
wrre adopled : 

Whkhkas. Ithaspless'd Almitjhty Ooil. Ihe 
Supieme kuler of the 1'ntverae, in Hia Infinite 
mercy lo remove fro-i our mid-t our beloved 
brother, Willi \m W. Waters, therefore be it 

A'es.'/ierf, That IP the death of William W 
WaTkRs, I'nion No. b.7, recogni/rj the toss of a 
kind friend a faithful officer, a loving father 
and n genial companion, and we (.inrrrrly trust 
that our lo-a wi.l he hin eternal gain therefore 
be it 

Jtftoked.ThM Local t'niod No. b, 7 lender its 
hennfelt sympathy to the family of Ihe deceased 
brother in this their hi! hour of * ill ktion. there- 
foie be it further 

AVio.W, That cur chatter be draped in 
mourning for a period of thirly dayi. that a 
copy of these resolutions lie presented to • l.e 
family of ihe deceased hrolher spreart on our 
minultr* and published in our official organ, 
Thk Car I'ENTKR. 

HKNKV /.[.VIMHRMAS , 

WII.UAM STVLBR, / CommMte. 

john t. cosoaovB. ' 



Claims Approved In February, 1899. 



No. 

*l:l7. 

M38. 

Ha*. 

MIO. 

4111. 

iiu 

W<3, 

UM 

SMI 

til.. 

4H7. 
1 1 II. 
HI'. 

HAu. 

till 

u:j 

i i >->. 
It I. 

41 -V 

II"-.. 

I I "jT . 

II •*. 
II > 

I loo 

m\ 
mi 

4 lot 

li'.l. 

MS& 

41^.. 

41-.T. 
4|.*. 
Hb;». 



I'SlliK. 



Name. 

Henry Kuhlrnad I 

William Klynn 10 

John Grabb .... 11 

John II. Brickerd .... -Jh 
Mn. r.oui*a O ruber . , Sfi 
Mrs. Mary A, McDonald tX 

Wm hiddler .:' 

Ben. shorten . . ol 

Jeremiah McCroliin t«H 

I'eter Almond b4 

Mre. Maggie Hand . . T-{ 
Mrs. Herbertinel Kin hoff tUt 
Nicholas Kommrl . . . 1.11 
lleorge A. Kaukin . , 14- 
Mrs. Adolphina Ol.*ou . . 147 

Jihn Burk 14- 

Jeremiah Drake I'd 

Anton Culgowskl . ,199 

Abraham 1,. Covert. . . . SBj 
Mathaes Kurz .... Hi 
Mrs. Katherice Volawinkler ,AH 
Mrs. Gertrude Huck , . . SOB 

Henry F. Kruse Jti 

Mri. Cltmrnson 3.*-. 

I hoi. 1'ercell S4u 

Mrs Mary Klingelh. rfler . ST3 
I.oui* Weber ... . . :I7.5 
Mrs. Christiana La sen 4.7 
Mrs Hllen Kenny ...... I ■! 

James P. Kgan 4'Jl 

Mrs Msry Kenney .... Si*» 

Thos. Lynch >J» 

P'red. Soitmanc Ml 

Total 



Am't. 
fiiD 00 
Jiai ini 

jim no 
a no 
■'m Oo 
j0.i i«j 
»« UD 
2w DO 
tOU "1 
ou ou 
.511 Ou 
•At) utJ 
■M) HO 
ri) SB 

Iim ui 
"0 i«J 
'Ji>i 00 

■m 00 

no 
HO 00 

;« ou 
a* t*j 

■Ja OO 

'-■On 00 

U to 

200 no 
.VO 110 
OB 

too OS 

.50 10 
_U0 On 
200 no 



. f4,4i. 00 



Claims Approved In March, 1899. 



No 


Naur. 


Union. AmT. 


4 171). 


John Holland , , . , , 


. . 1 


t 00 


4171. 


r.eorge II. Wells . . . 


. »i 


S*l i«J 


UTJ 


Mra. Mary ClBtor ... 


. . In 


SO 00 


117:1. 


l eter Wall ....... 


. . M 


ao at 


4 171 


Mis. 1- mily Jtratf. . . . 


. . IK 


..0 00 


4 I7 *i. 


Angus M McGillory . , 


. . 


- 00 


117'.. 


M-» Andrew Valequcite 


. . SJ 


J. ijO 


1177 






SBO 00 


117*. 


Mra. Annabella Thompaoa . 1.' 


'.' ■ 00 


II7U 


Mis. Kli/.a Croni 


d 


41 IS) 


tt*o. 


John si. Johnson , . . 


M 


m on 




W. K. iiurgan 


. SJ 


1*0 on 


IIS > 


Donald McPhee ... 


. . W 


*M Ml 


list 


John Htnkley . 


|» 


LUOUO 




Mra. Klla WuesthofT . . 


iiu 


m to 


1 IKS 


George Ilandor . . 


IJO 


90 CO 


44^;. 


Charles W. Whilhide 


. 171 


Jim in 


MS?. 


Mra. Ktnma < t!e*on . . 


1; 1 


SJ* 00 


1 IBS, 


Mrs. Anna Acketly . . 


17 i 


•0 DO 


11*0. 


Philip Hirtiel 


. 'Jin 


JUu ou 


two. 


Mrs. Therkla Sieivrr* . 


. sw 


r-j 00 


44111. 


Mrs, Jennie 1'nmber 


. 3V» 


SJ 00 


1 IMJ. 


Mra. Kalhatine Klugkiu 


:17S 


it 00 


1 in : 


Mrs. Ida Kohrdana . . . 


. 41'. 


So Ou 


lint 


Henry Faasch 


its 


Jr., II, 


1 111-".. 


William Kockford . . , 


1'-* 


3*0 OS 


in*;. 


Mra, M. Connors .... 


171 


SO 00 


4I"7, 


C baric* l.ersch ..... 


. 47', 


-•oo uo 


MS. 


Henry Meyer 


. 4U7 


90S 00 


MtKJ 


Philip Schildknecht . . 




.'no no 


use. 


Mr*. Pelelia Wawroakl . 


us 


SO ou 


i4d. 


M H Hroclsmith . . . 




SK (10 
















SUM 00 



THE CARPENTER. 



Drawing Lesson, 



KV V. W. WOODS. 



« Kir last lesson we took for our 
subject an isometrieal drawing of a 
tool chest. Not that we thought it 
presented any sp» elal merits over ary 
Other chest, but chose it simply for 
illustration purposes, In this lesson 
we take the same subject but illustrate 
in a different position, usualtj called 
cabinet perspective We brieve it to 
be more easily adapted to practical 
use than isonietrical drawing, as one 
of the views or sides is shown square 
or horizontal, and the adjoining si ties 
at an angle of ;,.> with same, whereas 



connected electrically with the central 
Office of a hotel. Just how many 
years the thermostat and its modifica- 
tions have been in use in this count! v 
it is hard to say, but it is anything 
but " Dew." With their very gen- 
eral use as tire alarms, and as regu- 
lators of hoi air and ventilators it 
seems strange that Kngland is just 
beginning to use them. 



Our Coal Supply. 



Fully one-quarter of the world's 
supply of coal is now mined in the 
United States, and in the last twenty- 



L . J 



Ho. ». 




in the former there are no horizontal 
lines or views. Fig. 2 illustrates the 
usefulness of this class of drawing in 
joinery work. 

The general remarks in our last 
also applies to this lesson. 



United Slates Ahead as Usual. 



Those who are acquainted with the 
progress of invention on both sides of 
the water frequently comment on the 
easy lead which this country main- 
tains over all others in this direction. 
As an instance of this, a recent notice 
in the London Invention might be 
cited. In this editorial mention is 
made of a " new " fire alarm system 
which has just been established in 
London. In the description of this 
system tb = article describes "special 
thermometers, called * thermostats,' " 
which are placed in each room, and 



eight years no country has come any- 
where near equaling it in the increase 
of production While the increase for 
the whole world has been less than 
one hundred per cent., that of the 
United States alone has been nearly 
two hundred per cent. 

In the calendar year 1897 tbe total 
production of bitumin' nd anthra- 
cite grades was 194,003 976 tons, 
worth at the mines JiyS.KOg .17,4. 
Local industriei and domestic con- 
sumption require an annually in- 
creasing amount, and on top of this 
we now have a strong foreign demand 
already large enough to warrant in- 
creased and more steady mining for a 
long time to come. 

With a present production ' more 
than five times greater than it was in 
1870, our exportations have increased 
from a ...Je more than a quarter of a 
million tons to more than four million, 
and is causing uneasiness In the coal- 
producing countries of Europe. 



Same Old Smoke Nuisance. 

Commenting on the fact th.it the 
smoke nuisance has been n nuisance 
for a very long time, a recent writer 
tells us that 6oti years ago, when the 
population of London did not exceed 

50.0110, its citizens petitioned King 
Kdward I. to prohibit the use of sea 
coal." and lu responded by doing so 
II is successors, however, permitted 
its use again. In r Si , John 1 velvn, 
in his " l-'umif Igfum, ' laments that 
■•owing to the increase of coal smoke 
the gardens are no longer fruitful," 
In the centuries that followed there 

were a number of parliamentary In 
quirit s and some legislation intended 
to mitigate, if not remove, the evil ; 
but nevertheless the consumption of 
bituminous coal has rapidly increased 
in London and the inquiries and leg. 
islation relative to it have all ended- 
in smoke. 

» • — 

Notes on Cornices 



The drawings below show di tier- 
en t ways of constructing a cornice 
The cornice marked Fig. A. shows 
the construction of a cornice for a 
brick building, the building having 



The one, I'ig- It, having a cnppei 
gutter and closed soiiit. which shield* 

the rafters nnd blocking, while | ... 

C t shows projecting rafters having 
finish' d ends and corners with a 
srooden gttttei instead of copper. 

treating a New Japan. 

With the Co operation of the I n ted 

States the empire ol Japan will eutei 
upon anew era In July next, w ! > n 
the treaty negotiated between tin- two 
countries several years BgO wil! 

Into effect The delay in putties it 
mto operation has been both int< n, 

tior.al and bt U4 fit i ll . 

The prime object of the treaty is to 
aid the upbuilding of the empire by 
cutting oil a variety of restrict ioi . 
that have retarded its progress 
k« pt it below the rank of a modern 
nation. With these oat of the w, 
[a;. an will have a fuller and freer in- 
tercourse with the nations of tl]f 
West than ever bt fote. 

The time Tor inaugurating the n « 

International relation Is most oppor- 
tune, and present conditions fully 
justify the delay The empire :s in 
much better shape to give and recei ■ 
pledges, and at no time has it cor 
manned so much of the reaped and 
friendship ■ >f I urope. 

Under similar treaties w ; th lb* 



/ 




2 - A' 



4 



4 C 



i 1 ■ 
El 



a French roof. The rafters resting 
on a 2 x 10-inch plate giving a sup- 
port so as to nail look-outs to same 
in constructing cornice. In this case a 
copper gutter is used instead of wood. 

Figs. B and C, are cornices which, 
aa a rule, are used for wooden houses. 



other great powers, foreign sett!<- 
ment, capital and enlarged trade will 
be greatly encouraged, and the empire, 
emerging from its long isolation, will 
find directly at hand the intelligence, 
experience, energy, wealth and all the 
best forces that have brought about 
modern civilization. 



THE CARPENTER. 



13 



1 al and Iron Supply Nearly 
l:\hnustcd. 



the general meeting of the in- 
( ,f Slitting Ungioeera in i.on- 
tlu- either clay, tin- ftddt*S* of 
. lent i.TUK'lon was devoted to a 

.•uistic review of the exhaustion 
usli roil and iron Hi said the 
• u <. .ill pointed to the fact that 
, yearfl hence we ■••hall he practi- 
di pendent n|)on the United 
. for cheap coal, iron and steel, 
gl ■ if nous will find an alliance with 
tilted BtAte* ior < tt*ling our navy 
i.itive." 



sttt 

<Jo« 
IV 



C i 



and paws where he had rubbed against 
the painted bars. He has been an in- 
mate of the menagerie for fourteen 
years The grizzlier have been there 
about four years. 



knight* Ol the Brush and the Bear*. 

..it-t painter* who undertook to 
J, , -\ the inUn )i of two bear rages in 
Central l'ark. New York City, last 
v. _ while the beasts wer. H ere, had 
gperiance as thrilling as that of 
t! ■ wheelman who coasted down from 
r Rack, in the Orange Mountains, 
it breakneck speed. The bears, two 

i. .•• griz/lic* and a great vpecinea 
il thi polar family kept the painter* 
, r. imp and made two keeper* 
h isUk about with th-ir iron bars to 
prevent the belt* Iron ;Mng teeth 
ir. ! i law* on the mi n. 

, :.< .lens are on the top of Hear 
Hill,' in the mtnigerie, and are 
Separated] from ea-h other by stiong 
•.run barn. In the grictlie*' ra< toaure 
rockj ledge, to tin- t, (; , of which 
an iron ladder. The polar bear 

i- -.n his cage an arli.se tl tree, with 
a wojdeti platform at the lop, and a 
Care. The painters had tXttl paint 
ing the outside of the cages the day 
befott and knew tli< beasts were not 
too frii ndly diap »aed towards them. 

With many ■ siagiving they en< 
tered the cagce, accompanied by f at- 
* It Marron and William Snyder, 
keeper*, who were armed with iron 
'..irs. One began work in the polar 
bear'* den. while the Other two were 
engaged Ifl the other cage The bears, 
'.though used to the keepers pres- 
ence, resented th? int:::sltm of the 
oth' r* and ambled about in a manner 
that kept the painter* on the verge of 
nervous prostration. The prods of 
the keeper > only made the bears more 
restless. They snorted angrily and 

darted around so that the painters 
imagined that they would be in the 
V-ars' embrace every moment. 

Atoun ! the cages gathered a crowd, 
awl warnings shouted to the men 
added to their tetror. They wire so 
nervous th..t paint was frequently 
Bpiaahed on the bears below. A cry 
from the crowd that the bears were 
after them made them rlrop paint and 
brnah and put for the highest points 
in the cage. Those in the gri/>rfies' 
dan climbed to the rocky ledge, while 
the other shinned up th* artificial 
ttee and ar.ught refuge on the plat- 
form. Disregarding the keepers' 
Mows, the grizzlies started up the 
ledge, but the men swung out of their 
reach on the cross bars. After a few 
moments of tern lied perching and 
swinging thf> beasts were prodded 
into submission and the men were let 
out of Uie cages. 

In the meantime the polar bear had 
taken on a strange coat Blotches of 
t£««n paint were on h! B body, nose 



flenera) Laws. 

w****tvp i Wei ku- Payn#*tt*r*tfcfr»a«i 

r .u-.enient fur member* of itns D fo Owt b ood, 

i, >: » here practicable ihonld be adopted 

C«»1Vli r 1, mm Wfl will not U'r any null or 

■ ,1 • r ■. vi'ii k manufactured io > penal institution, 
oi btoughl from any 'own or ii y wheie cheap 
labor prevails 

I.Au-ia Hombai We favor the adoption of 
tbe Krai Mosd«y in September m Labors MoU- 
: -v ninl we ie. >,:nmeud that our I. P.'* -hill 

tu'it., or to obec rv e it* —*w 

E.L.ir HO us our I., t s shall do nil in 
I Bell power t') mukr tlir l-.iRh'-hour rule liai 
v. f«; anil In sustain IhOM Patau that l.,,vf 
now established the Light-hoLr system. 

Amu *ih.k ITniiBiai » if hi i Tan Q I r, 
Should do ail <■ Ml I»o*er lo discourage strikes 
an t a I jjt fciich mean', hh will tend to t.r in k 
B* ,ul H nmical !e MHtentBudifllj t<eiween I.o-.al 
I mom and em; 1 n > ^ r - - 

Ul N I.va. We desire uniform hen lnws 

tbfi uKh-.ut the t'sited State* and Canada, mik- 
ia*a lueehaoti ■> lien iin-fi-.i mortgage o* real 

es! f- to acsut* the wane-" • I labor first an 1 

aunerf at aceoad Boch lleoa abanld l.eKotnie<i 
•ettbotil 1*1 K »taya ! eaerution Ol «.ther un- 
u' i e»»ai> dt ■ 

*t n»nfM"T**ir*nCoi ncil* —Bach L.C atiall 
MTtve to form i council coatnawd of deleR4te« 
fi itti the* varlott* 1 ntonaoftht botldmg tradca 4a 
its •-.; <.: vr otjr, an.l b» thl* mean* aa employ- 

rrrnt liutrioi !ji lhe»r iraile» can ti- erected 

GatOIMi, W \<.t s Wt if <*i.;.o»e'l to any 
,>,tr''i r,i KtadiRB wa-je* in :he LcKOl !'nlot;^ 
«e leem ;!se WaV«**taafallS|Bg I" the tra.le and 
a f irllie- ns-e: Mve tn rerk''»» L> an petition 
baritltf 'he y|l mat- tni'lv . y when woik i* 
vgur lo allow lit-l rt*M »'< n O otT' r their 

latwt >t I'm 1 ctaaa price* W« hoM tint thf 
bla*of**ta( i auaiinum pttce f or a «Iaj » w«<ra 
loWtfe* aalea) and l«rM md let 1ft* emt>loyel 
itra '.e the w ,■{• ^ all itn 'hit mil '■■> "n 



■ tl l: : t- 



t * - ' 

Tie above tab*! printed cn titue pa[«r will he 
fiund on all jl^lt t O » *CC* and on Ihe wr»i pei» 
( cl:e whir i il hn j manufa^lurera in union 
I baee* factonea 



Ihlnx* to be Remembered]. 



TM*** m .nth* in arte, ,t» ii;'>relt, a merahet 
t , 1 of lirlli-Sll. 

^ii \\ \ attendance at the meeting- Kives lilt 
an 1 intercut lothe t nieu. 

v vaata got** lo another i ity ahould be 
j.-i ■ ie 1 with ii clearance car.l 

At: local Iftaattfera adOOtd he under bou.li. 

aodtbi booda died oUbtaaprcaidaotof t*«L r. 

li^ mih lepirt* -hont l>r prepared aein • 

aDiiu lly i.iid I .i ward, 1 to the U.S -T. JlUnkr, 
«ie iumislied fiee lot that purpose. 

a 1 1 eaaagca in ■ecratariM ihould !«• promptly 

reported lothe <1. s T , and unme and nddreaa 
ol the new 6 citlary aliouUl Da (ir wauled. 

i)n...\M/\t!ir Carpenter- in Ihe unoiRanited 
IOO/M in yoiirviL-iuily, or whirever you m«y no' 
II Id pabiiC t!ie«tiu K -or aooal fe-liv«l» :,t tUted 
O ctMtoaa . thef will add to the Btieut;lli of youi 

Ualoa, 

l.nim- for the C.enetal Office s.h.>uld he 
wntteu on Official note pajier aud hear tile -eal 
of the ! oral I nion. Don't wnle lelt« rs to the 
O, a T. on m nithly report hlauka, a- aocb com- 
m»aiCati«*l ..it not IM proper ahupe 

ALL niniiey- teceived hy Ihe G S.-T. one mo th 
are pWbHahcd m the neat month's JoarML 
Moaveya reoeieed tatmoi be puhiiahcd in tUa 

jo irnal the same month they ;ire received. It 
lakea aome time to make up the report ami put 
it inlo type 

T'o uly B «fe way to -end money ia by pjsl 
offk lonev order or by bank check or draft. 

■I required ii^ the Conatitatioa, The t;, s -T. is 

not responsible for mOOCy sent in any other w.iy. 
Don't i*nd looiecaah or poNlBKeatamim In pay- 
ment of tax or for any bill due the G. S.-T, 



Nine-Hour Cities. 



MOM ia a li-t of ihe cities and towni* where 
carjienter* make It a rule to work only nine 
bourn a day : 



AlBiBB, Oreg. 
A ! HOB, Mas* 
A in* -hu»y . M.-s 
Anaconda. Mont. 
Atlantic City N. J. 
AtltBgtOU, Ma-«. 
Airans,is Hart.or, Tei. 
AUenlown, Pa 
Amsterdam, N V. 
Aiiic'.rte*. Wash. 
A-tn, Park N. J 
Aa'toita, OreR 
Asheville, N C. 

Aubnra, n. y. 

Autiuru. Me. 
Altoona. Pa. 
Apollo Pa. 
Anderaofi, lad 
AUeRheny City. Pa 
Altojoy.N. V. 
Aimin. Tea. 
BatiRor, i'a. 
Batavia, N y 
Baltic Creek, MkIi 
Baata, Moat. 

Bell. Mont 
Bay City, Mich. 
Ma- Harbor Me. 

Baltimore, M I. 

helle Vrrooi., Pa. 
HanKor Me. 
Bath Beach, N V 
Bethlehem. Pa. 
Muri- :i^t <n la. 
Buffalo N V 

Mosl .!i M -s- 
Bryn M;,wr. Pi 
Butler. Pa. 
Kayo one N 1 
Boi<>e City. Idaho 
BridRtlon. N ; 
B!ai:ie, Wa-h 
BndRepoit Ohio 
Biadlord Maaa. 
Brunawick. Mt. 
Braddo^k. Pa. 
Belliire, Ohio 
Belle**!^. ||] 
Bella vOle Can 
Bellevue pa 
Bri lg«|H» t. Conn, 
lifo. kton . Maaa. 
Beaver Pali* Pa, 
Brook lin- Maaa. 
Butte, Mont. 
Canton O. 
CartieRte Pa 
Central PalN. K I 
t. • P' lnl X V. 
Co leitr Hill O 
Con»hohuck^n Pa 
Corllaml & Y 
C«rrollt n. (ia. 
Cairo, III. 
Calvary. Can 
Cneista, M ,«» 
C.iarleroi. Pa 
Ch irleatow n, W Va. 
Chester. Pa. 
Ciucinnnt' Ohio 

Covin at on K>. 
Coluinbu-. Ob. 
Co uni boa tBd. 
Camden. X I 
Cone Jidia Kan. 

Collinavdli rd. 
Cohoes X V 
Corsicaoa. Tea 
C jlumbus, < IhlO 

Cambridge m.i-» 

Cfiar I e -*lo wn , Mas-. 
Chatianoo^a Teon. 
Coraopolis Pa. 
Carton dale Pa, 
Colorado City Col 
Colorado spin n-. C jI 
Cornwall, X V 
Coirynlle. Ohio. 
Dover, x J 
Delhi, Ohio 
Dayton Ky 

Moine- I wi 
Daver) pori . [owa 
Diver. X Ii 
Decatur. III. 
Dolham M»-- 
Dorc heater, Mi,». 
Dnh.th Mum 
D ique-ne. Pa 
Dubuque. Iowa 
Dalian Tea. 
Kl Prtao, Tea 
Kaal Liverpool, Ohio 
Haul SafElnaw. Mich. 
Kaal t>r«nRe X J 
l-:«»l Portland. « >ieR. 
liasl Boat OB, Mas* 
Ka-loii. Pa 

KUtamrt*. X. J 
1 .1 wood , Pa. 
Hrie, l*a. 
p;nnlr wfod. N. J. 
Plean-ville. Ind, 
Heereit, Maaa. 
Haeter, N. H 
Poit Brooke. Pla. 
Pair Haven \Va»h 
Pairrnoiint. W. Va. 
Hall Kner. Mass. 
Flndlay Oi"o 
Kitchliiii ji, M -is* 
H-ir Kockaway, X. V. 
Prank fold. Pa, 
Franklin, P 1. 
Part Worth, Tea. 
Port Wayne. Ii.d. 
Koatorla Ohio 
Prank) hi, Mi as. 
(lalesiit'tg. III. 
Grand Kapida. Mich. 
Greal h*jlla. Mont 
Greenfield, Ind. 
Glouceater. Mans 
Greenville, Pa. 
Germautown I'a. 
Greenwich, Conn. 
Grove City. 
Glen Cove. X V. 
Greensburg. Pa. 
Hot Sprinaa, Ark. 
Homestead, Pa. 
Hertford. Conn. 
Hi I if a i. X. 8. 
Hampton. Va. 
Haverhill. Maaa 
Hackensa.lt. X J. 
llBrriman, Teiin. 



Motine. III. 
Mobile, Ala. 

Moutl'ISVlllr, W. Va. 
Mnnisln«, Mich. 
Muncie, ind 
Muskegon. Mich. 
McKe- sport, Pa. 
Mt Pleasant, Pa. 
Milburn. X. J. 
Mldel City. N Y 
Montclair. X. J 
vlt. Wabhuiftton, O 
XiaRara Falls, N, Y. 
Xor wood , O. 
New Britain, Conn. 

Xelaoavillc, <> 

North K:i*ton, Mas*. 
New KensiiiHtou. Pa 
Xorfolk. Va. 
New Orleans, 
Newpfjrt, K. 1. 
Newport, Kv. 
Newport New*, Va. 
N;w Bochelle. N Y. 
"-ewburyport. Meat. 
Newton Centre M as. 
N^naimo. Brit. Col. 
Nyack. N Y 
Norwood, Mesa 
N. I.a Croase, Wis. 
N itchei. Mi-s. 
New Cumber lan'!,\V i. 
N t w Cahtle, Ka. 
.'.'ew liaven.Conn. 
New Haven. Pa 
New London, Conn. 
New Westminster B. J. 
Natick, Maas. 
Newton , Maas. 
N-wburRh , N Y 
New Be.ilord, Mass. 
New Albany. Ind. 
N -w Brunsw.ck. X. J. 
Xorthamplon Ma- . 
X ^rwich. Conn 
Nor walk . Cuno. 
i >ce mil , X J. 
mwriio. N. Y. 
(i^ leii, I lah 
Olneyville. K. L 
tilean, X V. 
Ottawa. Can. 
uttumwa, Iowa 
Ottawa. Ill 
Ontario, Cal. 
Orange Tex 
Olympia, Wash. 
Oneonta N. Y. 
Peru. 111. 
Pittafleld, Ma i 
Pawtucket, k I. 

Port Caester, X V 

PuozautaWney , Pa. 

Pensacda Pis 
Perth Am boy. X. J. 
Peter -orouxh. Can 
Portland meR. 
Port Townwu l, Was'.-. 
Pa-aaic. X I, 
Phoenix Ariz 
P ymouth Mass. 
P 'raeroy. o. 
Portland. Me 
Port Angeles. W ash. 
Port-mouth. N ii. 
pjrtsiuouth. Va 
Portsmouth, ti 
Pocatello. l.iaho 
Pouitlikeepsie N. Y. 
Patterson. N. J. 
Philadelphia, Pa. 
Plain(i--ld X } 
PittaburRh, Pa 
Feck»kil1, X . V. 
Pierre S Dakota 
Parker sburR. W Va. 
Paria. Texas 
Poiterville, Cal. 
Peoria, III. 
Providence. K L 
yuincey Mass. 

HIS. 

Rockland Me. 
Kc»Ckvitle, Con i. 
Kacine. Wia. 
Koc u ifrr, Pa. 
Richmond, Va. 
Kithr nd Kv, 
kick Island, III. 
K'-mir. X. V. 
konduiit N. V. 
Koxbury Man 
Rochester, X. Y. 
Pusedale. Ind. 
Kevere. Mass. 
Riverside . Cat 
K-.it>;, iik, N }. 

Redlanda, Cm 
kiiiherford. N J 
* FraminRhsm, M>»s. 
spring tie lo, Mass 
Si Augustine, Fin 
M Joseph, Mo. 
Souih N jrwalk. Conn. 
South Bend. lud. 
Salem, Maaa. 
Monebam, Maaa. 
Somerville. Mass. 
S nuerville. N. J. 
SaltsburR. Pa. 
San AngelO Tei. 
Sandusky, Ohio 
Shreveport. La. 
Stamford, Conn. 
SeaClifT, X. Y. 
SpriiiRtield, Mo, 
Springfield, Ohio 
Ban Leandro, Cal. 
Steuben ville, Ohio 
Santa Anna, Cal. 
Santu Ko-a Cal. 
St John. N. B 
Saxouville. M 
Schenectady, N 
Scottdale, Pa. 
Spokane. Wash. 
Sharon. Pa. 
Sheffield, Ala. 
Strealor. III. 
StouRhton. Masa. 
B. Abingdon. Mass. 
Bt Catherines. Ont 
Eault St. Marie, Mich. 
Ban Bernardino, Cal. 
Scran ton Pa. 
Sharpaville. pa. 
Sharpaburg. Pb. 



Rarriaborg, fa. 
Henderson, Ky. 

HadaMt, Maaa. 

H-rkimer. N V. 
Ho -sick Pall., N. Y 
H» l' Park. Maaa. 
iloboken, n j. 

MolyokC, Mass. 
Houston, T*-x. 
Houstoti Height*, Tex 
IMlMboro, Tex. 
Hi'iRham, Maaa. 
IrviuRtoi . N. Y. 
rrhaca, N Y. 
Jacksonville, 111. 
J ickaori, Mich. 

Jacksonville, Pla. 
feianette. Pa. 
J-rsey City, N. J. 
Kearney. Neb. 
Knoxville, Teon, 
Kingston, N. Y 

ttaiiapetl, Mout. 

1,3 Salle III. 
LBBOB Masa 
I.-aven sworth Kv. 
LansingburR s. Y, 
Lawrence M.,>-, 
I.a Crosse, Win. 
Logans port, Ind. 
Lowell, Mass. 
La rchbtirg. Pa. 
Leomtnater, Mass. 

Lafayette. Ind. 

Lewnatoa. Me. 

Lincoln. Neb. 
L Hie Falls, N V. 
Londin, Ci*"ada 
Lockland, o. 
Lonu it inch. X. J. 
Li linville, Ky 
Marpioro, Mass 
Morristown, N. J 
M , il ft y uuk. Pa. 
Ma! Icn Ma>s. 
Mi 11 vi lie N. J. 
Media. Pa 
Mead ville Pa. 
Medford, Mas- 
Minneapolis Minn. 
Mirblehtad, Mass. 
Marlon, lud 
Mavheld. Kv. 
Mon^ngahela. Pa 
Martin's l-e rv • h:o 
Ma-peth, N V 
MlliOrd, Ohio 
Mama roneck, X . V 
Mercer, Pa. 
Middleaborough Ky. 
Madtaonville. O. 
Mmsfield Valley. P.i. 
Meridcn, Conn. 

Total, 



Santa Crui, Cal. 
Saginaw City, Mich 
EUou* City Iowa 
-iheepshead Bay, N Y. 
Seymour, Texas 
Bejrmoor, Ind. 
Summ" N. J. 
Southaiupton. X. Y. 

Tampa, Pia. 

Taunton , M,w 
Tawas City, Mich, 
Tarrytown, N. Y. 
Terre Haute, Ind. 
The Dalles, oreg. 
Tirliii, Ohio 
Toronto, Ohio 
Toledo, Ohio 
Toronto, Ont. 
Trenton, X. J. 
Trinidad. Col. 
Troy, X. Y. 
Tarentuin, Pa 
Turtle Creek. Pa. 

Taylor, Pa 

Texarkana, T xaa 
I'ni'irj Hill, N. J. 
fiica. X. Y. 

tjatoatown, Fa 

Vancouver, B C. 
Vn tana, B. C. 
Vincennca, Ind, 
Visalla. Cal 
Waxuhalchie, Texas 
WeUaburff, w. Va. 
Weai Hotnken X J. 
West Iiolutb, Minn. 
Weatfield Mi;s. 
Warren, Ohio 
VVinthrop Ma<s 
Windsor, Can. (Ont.) 
Weymouth. Masa. 
Wet,t Troy. N. Y, 
Wabash. Ind. 
Wiiltnnm, Mass. 
Waukegan, III. 
W.Newton, Mass. 
Worcester, Mats, 
W'ashinRtou, Pa 
Wilmington, Del. 
Whitman, Mass.. 
Woburn, Mass 
Winchester Mass. 
Wheeling. W Va. 
Wilkinsi.urg Pa. 
Winnipeg, M:.n. 
woodsidc. N V. 
Winneld, N. Y 
Waiertow l, X Y. 
Williams Bodge, X. Y. 
Yoakum, Tex. 
Vork, Pa. 
Young-town Ohio 
Zaneaville, Ohio. 

4^0 cities. 



i \:n\ -.1 \ I > r I4AT« 



This Label if 
ab m bb m ii ad 

:i 0*11* sc|ii.ui R*d 

:s printed ou bug 

Colored piper. It 
is placed on everv 

union made tint 
before it leaven the 

\ : kmau - hand- 

il a deali r taken a 
label from one bat 
Bad plaoea it In an- 

i'lh.-i <•! H |i Buy dit.islied l..'a.l» in hi- >i re, do 
n l b«y bum him, is his labeU may Ik- counter 
frit r.d hi- bit> IBajr be th, pr ili.ct OfaCtb "t 
nun union tatMM ■ 

mnom tailoi>' 

IfVIKIIIIIII 





All rnideo t'nionlsta are requested to aak for 
the label of the Journeyman Tailora' Union, and 
Inniat on liavingit when tbey order any clothing 
frotu a meridian t Uilor. It U to bo found In tba 
ttudde l.r.ii-l i>ock<.'t of tbe toaSj on the under 
side of tlit? buckle atrap of llw vest, and on the 
wi.iatlia.iid lining of the pa ma. 1| Is printed in 
blat k Ink on white liueu, with the words "Jour- 
neymun Tad lore' Union of Amertca" In red ink in 
m» centre. » It means a fair priw fur good work 

DJHOM WADK CLOlllhS. 



moniit or 




HUiSUlUP 



Thin Label lathe only positive guarantee that 
Kiady-made Clothing, including overalls aud 
jacketa, is not made under the dreaded, diseaae- 
iii Tested tenement bouaeand sweating system. 

You will find the linen label attached by ma- 
chine stitching to tbe Inside breast pocket of 
the coat, on tbe Inside of the buckle strap of the 
' est , end on the waistband HnittBol the nam*. 




Of The United States. •Q'^ 



r«»ot »«« aio'srrato 



14 



THE CARPENTER. 



F 



Moldings, 

BY A \V. WOODS. 

In the last number of Tin; Car- 
tkntkr we illustrated »he classical 
moldings from which the moldings 
now in common use are largel} - 
modeled. The accompanying illus- 
trations show combinations of these 
moldings in forming cornices, etc. 
In some of these the framework is 
shown, while in otht-rsonly the out- 
line of the combinations are shown 

The grouping of moldings is 
susceptible of many chnnges and it 
requires careful study on the part of 
the constructor to so arrange them to 
get the proper effect. 

While we do not present the accom- 
panying illustrations as models 01 
arrangement, we submit them to 
those who feel the need of assistance 
in that line. 

The moldings here employed are 
what are called or knowr as stock 
molds and may be had at any up-to- 
date lumber yard. 



The White Woman's Burden. 



She pronounced In aotiudlBg platitude 
Hn unieeraal itenittnite 

I .t mm ,>l evn\ tatim l« 
I'li m the ttVpU - t9 Ihr jhiIc- , 

she i«U • ronanngtilnlty, 
A ntaerly affinity, 
A kin. I oj kit fa kivilj 
POt 8-1 the!.e ( in Ign -..ill. 

I'im Cale Ion: i 1 1 i Tj 1 .< ti. ! r r« . 

Far brutal S"inh su lalnoderct, 

Vat wet and n .'Ut tlrjP Undent, 
Hor Otntilr. Greek and )rw . 
POt l inn* at'd for Siberian*. 
For Arab* Mid A get i tnH, 
Kor Terra-lei I'm Hint)-, 

she »a5 in a eonatam mh, 
I rtl, it worritl mu» Aopferonla 

I.e»t t tir- mm at I'ntngOftta 

hltonid tlie wiiii the pne luontfl 
With thr phthiata nt t'ir chill*, 
Yes, indeed, *he w.ijrird .lai's 

i.e*t i ctoopot col I should wiylny 
Boat* root Sen 'mie*r ni Malav, 
Dying tan thr Utek of pa*11n. 

An. I the toilrd cm Without mea-ut. 

And «nh moat raatioted ptMJHirr, 
Hit the K.*id of Centra .\«'a. 

Ami the I'aRttn penule there 
Rot meanwhile lier little MMei 
Ine l ol a tteKleclrd blister, 
Hut S'lphrmiia hardly mt"-r.' her 

i ; or ahi hud no lime In •part 




E 



J\ 



or - 

— —J 



2C 



2*4 



Tin: strike of the carpi ntt ts ot 
Homestead, l'a , which began May 
ist. was dt dared oil at ,i meeting held 
on the 9th in st , by the conttartoi 
and a committee uf the stiiktis at 
Monath s Hall. The contractors 
granted the demand for an advance of 

• per cent, in wages 



W I w 11 »j»-.ik out wr will t,i luat.' 

rhuinjh aii f.uth < rvatemaeta'i k 
We trill iini Hi- n linn * »i.i. i 

Not lake a Irllrt ha. V. 



I My While WitHhitfl OUatone. 



rhe act 6H»| nnyini llluattntioni reptr* i , , 
t,ltj Wlttta Wu'iitta niuii.il>-. mmmtta i> , 

i like Mm. iiiln I .iiiil; • iiiiI|>iiiiv pikl -i, 
I Hin, S II . tttd i i I liiimtii't* .trert, v rw ■,.„., 

rhe Wnahtfa ttatone )>>i» neon t>,r Ir ,,, , 
nilMonc foe ahnrpenlog rwrpe Men nwtj 
toole font ureal many yenta put, Htevi 

Ita ittttOalUctluO OtJ lb* Hilfnimi tllaikrt 
Mlv \tat» ago O r Hiii.. to. ! l'urkrt -!>>>.. 

principally uaetl ftw mecltanira' tn -i». j 
vsa^hita i'V rvnifn t n> i >> mtting qua 
i'n i 're.-.ti>iii ii>. i rnt k% ituj RvnuiN anun 1 , 

t.i i-fw.l t'n liit.rv -t. Nt mil tA HU DM 

until i" i >iav yntj ''it n feet ntnMai i . 

■Old in \meti> a U . >iii'tei«iRi 1 t 

Vanhltn atoM '» *< *oi I ' •. • 1 1 the brat t 
unite ii i hi >i>> »« >» ell 




■ » - - * 




W. apenk »l»e Imth and wh.. ine»r 

K.-i hi»«i it|| am! tvt •lotn, 
While « itur Mini |tl«nnOn^« wr run »ee 

i »f freedom m crnniug mm n 

I.el li»r>. fe„r l r t r,.watd. Onu.L 

i et trnitora turn away , 

W Imirv. ■ Mr hivr rlnred t>i think 

rh«l dare wr ila»*ns 

— '.i m, A i, 'I. I r. 



Tilt: Hoard of Public Works of 
nuluth, Minn., has sent notices to iLs 
street foreman to the effect that Aldi-r 
man NVfi s rt-solution making ei^hl 
hours a day 's work for city employee* 
and making the rait- .it p*y twenty 
cunts an hour, will go into etket et 
once. 



Thr «tj .!.»»• i, ; i> th> tt'aabha nnn' • 

l>rrn the I*. ! thai H ir. ;-ii red » ( ti*l len Id* .1 
l-rr ence in Mlatonee i>> Mtetl | ;»t Ik* . > 
grin f»t dtffetent pnr| >w>rae Waahtte tl an 

■ ir *> it *M>t \rrv f.^t 1 irttlnn *>» ' ilr • r . •» 
inlte hul l, l,n» K"He I »n,t inl mw ' Muoci 

1 he »cfi pomoa ttonee nrith medin » 

f«»t nltine K'tt ai' 1 1 t b*at * Inpta i to «h» , 
eninn ttrdinnty i lyiienteta' look aach ■> | . » 
h 1*. rntaela at * "*i ir ^ * ■ He rneaa nt>>Tir^ . 
a qnck, Hfedinn onraetdga raitablei i « •>! 

i"« ».*ft WOOll «nd >>the» IUMNI In jcrn>-i* 
■o l. I nr w *<■). it* , on thr . Th-' haii 1 ... 

■ luirr nlijr >mh ■( r>>j ic.l ' i mi ' 11 «' . • 

for wood vprkinj to to * ■■■ u«e t >r, >, .■ 
pt BneeaMoei m tk hut thiaaii if . .i- - 

l-ian the • tt. .111 I n 1' irunni atotoll 1. 1 

to hec a a i n ginned nirteen >c-».i in'-i.t. u , v 

tip to the 1 Mf ..■<.. i:. n ..! i.ily white M*i 
Wnxhtt* moM driUi- i»in'. j netkteti iwuej 

■halt kkf > • .'i» . ■ hi h ClMltntn* hoi I] > » 

iu- : an i -.ft >tone<) m Ml aHonydMIni ■ 

••••el* I y I ' thai a «re . m . 





ta 
«»r 



carpenirtu ini.poaiflgtlir ttn I qnnliiy t>. 1 •• ■■- 
••••t, and not twuiK iWe i 4t*llngniak ■ Ud 
firmi ■ aolt atone imvr arlerted ><r't thai 

mil »iiii.iMi fur Iheir |>ur|; >r i«n.| have 1 ■ I 

ioie roodtniMd t ie Wnnkita >>tooe, irhev i 

••11I fauti win nn' in tlir >.r> nr t | .)! t,ut 
1 ha I I st'-ne tin v 1 m if 1 rr n .!•!•• 1r>l altrtl 1 1 
■hotl >l lurr leleeted * *• if I »t r >nr, und i. >• a 

' lie t.iU \'i hue w uhttfl •« pot nt- fa* th • 

• euai ptirp»»f > f prreenttni ntleinken ol 

kind It 1* rn nufnetltted Ifnm 1 tie trofy hll -* 
grille ol M i4*)nln r... k. hy (killed emj.l in ( 

>v raperieoce Thr i niaked nmrt > t 

1 ill v tetei le.l and Ir.ied »iy eti.rtt* hi thr | 
lull .s '.rir mrh «tune i» !■(<■>, I rutin " • " 

• 11 hat'i " air it.ltn, to Ii il t!ie rr.ull. «j 

lent ntny proee It to be 'iii-~.fi medl • »t«* 

I. ran. I tl t*fl*ci*ttj itinnnnrt Ird lit • r.ti . v 





me wlitlr t(:e hard, rm d' im Jim- aliirli* i* arta] 
led to nhnrprnlm. tool* lr<|nlriltj| a mv tt 

tin h nlKe. It j* n »]jleiidi>l iininhin>r Nt Mil' 

The t.ily White liiand !•> mad' up In tf0ri< "* 
«i^e* and nhatie.- fur nhar{>enin| nil kin '- ' 
ed«e tooln. i:veiy it 00 1 i» tW*»U*A by tl" 
inHnufniturera to give Mtif fncttmii shunh: «" 

Uty white mom f«n to do 1 hi*, denleti v* 

tntkOfletd to refund .he money or reflate llif 
•■tnne. an I he mitortier mitv ( hoone. 

In a later mi 111 her of THB CAHPBMTRM we aha II 
allow olhrr lutnia ol uilaliinea, and a fa nil have 
•OnUtMng to aay on the uae and csrr ><f oil- 
stonea, a auhjeel whkh ia of qutle 11a mm Ii im 
portance aa that of atlcctlDf the Hone. 



THE CARPENTER. 



10 




;|ur n-fullinrtrn Rftij 

} i Btf irflonb (it) Soruivr b. t Brotbvrl 1 

C. .-. |. "i America, HueTunU o,rb, n 
toftwM ucrr 3o|anRf4 .di-.ui, o>i6 Snalbfn« 
■ mb. Xriit'djuittb, ttfiftfttt SKtftlitfc bn 
1 netnuilcets' Union No. , |o nu^f 
rrt|(nS<x flf'dUiftft bic Krunfr cm ULUtEj-lm 
id)]*. Ml W. :iJ Sir , i-b^c be- bun 
itvgni Beftcttftf 6 Stlirh.1, Kocil Union 
i I Rl R) -JliUf, aii.;.!-. si 
S I' Id btiTii\f»'.br ,Miimlifnofitid'inifii 
• km W gfttawti nubiufnbM inodj'ti 

tr prulrlnnfit f0cltf«fttt«§, 

nr qrcfi fin* fttjatenf .\om roar 
< \. bir tn bfn t'fu'n o,o lirtu 
If lariaig b<r oaturrn itW It firm 
burn 'i^-.bu&all 'anb, b«n ttftfll 
".'ai alt Iritif'iiHtatiutnlQrt im 
bif mlfTiiatuntatf i*inti;S)Tunfl 
. ■•« i..trn flittftunbftiiflflce tu et flnten. 

*[Ui)(»n rf tflf blidifrt t!rr(uo)fn, bit 
, ^nUmaUonaW nbex btr (Hnuibunitsftabifn 
Ijmaiia tu hi'dinn ,iot)li !ifin sjfbfn tu enl* 
aiffftn, irar f* rtnf fib?b<ubc £,fnr, ale au< 
bfR) hit ^otbtruna hf» I'lKrraiionalrn ilr« 
("tittfoneif f'tn tn tiane, unltr bnn 

Utitcn unb Hnffimniften iln'uU b,r Tflfi 
flnten bit Itjtit ttu f fl(ftfllt it'iitbf, bafc bi< 
v ftflf ''tuna tn ;1ib,it««u bif (•irunbfotm 
■ f.-tnlrtfttnifffl 'tin tnu'if: 
ttii bfi Hut'ifUunfl bi,l#r :ti;lf tsjt mil 
rami e41afl< b:t ^iurrnationa!( p«>(!t $t> 
fotbfn. SfftfiTl mnq brr .rtTbfite'm mar 
n mm nn baa pntftdjfl vt ttnubtnbt , ; t « I 
i rt bit" fid, bae ptolftatiat ttRig WttfcU, Ift 
Rjnqiffj in P i.ib flab au ( Hntiiia fcfs from 
tjfitjjrn flbsfotbrnrtfii vacifinf 'jlsmbrt, im 
imcn b«9 ftanuiei bre flatiiinali'ftbanbr". 
b<*i Si itt'aHraTiinftn unb ^i^ifrrmf fltt 
't'Utir «e(jlu!ion fin^U'fl bt» .Huuititinuna,: 

i Si miftttnc flrofit nniir.iiiav 9tanii 

iffttfio* bfT Wrbnlfr atlfr uanbft btiatt 
rttantialtft rofrbfn, baf? an bon namlio^fn 
fftniibartni ia^r in allm 4.>mb«n lei. 
aUnnie bif Rtfrnttt bif Sntirtn b»t fc»rn 

*4ftib*n i'^i-iT'iii aujfarbmt, bif flttrfcttaV 
7 jufr bfB iltttiHiagfe air a bt itunto; |u 
tf<a)idnfrn 

! t'tro,nvim, fcfti (till aSnitoV Wanu 
'rftaiion ton btm im r^^nbrr, '"ta't« 
or&Jbtfn Monat(^ btt «n:frifar.if(4fn fabft* 
atton btt Jlibm, <ut btn 1. »ai. bf* 
1o>u"ifn rrrtitn, \H bif'tft latum tut bie 
httftfMtlonsU Ufntonfiration (u brittmitun, 
J. Jn ;'t«m vanbe (oUrtr b\t .Hcbttkr bie 
naniffftatien in bti ffirre pera«flalt«, 
i»t I ili f bit fflflfpt unb bit jitibaltntfTt battlbfl 
btbtnflfii, bti. tniii>fllto>tn. 

lit tlttiirtatitr allit I'unbrr bubtn lum 
fltbftltn 2t}ttl btn ^t'djtuji tituli^ aus^t • 
ffifrt Itt l.i'iai tft pio!ttati((tft ffitlt' 
•titrtafl atroctbtn. 

3vm ncunttti IRalt uiftfl ft a) bat atbti* 
tenbt ^tot! aUtr liSnbtr btn Ki»nflitfibffa>luR 
<ut J(ultut(tunfl |U bunfltn. Son .labr <u 
^at)t ift bit Ttmon ft tatton tint flrofcatlifltrt 
ffrreotbtn. immtr arrraliiDdt lSafitn ittttn 
auf btn i'lan al« mabnttibt* (Ittpifltn btt 
biitfltrUcfetn i^tltUlo)a«t. it)i bit liUtlUnbifl. 
una an btt vttbtttriflafft butdi it)"" Ku" 
matld) pot ttuittn tubttnb ilit btr Klufftel* 
lunfl bet ^otbtiuna, btl atit^l.^tn Ko)t< 
ftunbtnta^t* bat btr HanUr Ronflttfi btn 
Himflidjfitn ilUir* flrib^n, btn btt ptolttai t1 d)t 
itropaqanba auf^umttfrn bat. Tit llrbrtttt' 
(laffe aUtr Vanbtt bat bamit anfltfanfltn, 
tintn btroufittn, tuibttt(id)tn iv'iU.n iu bti 
funbtn. Tat l ntlnn nad) btt Utttroittltq)* 
unfl ber AOibttuna. ttdflt untnblta) uiel jut 
SBt<funa.unb HuPhilbuttfl btfl «lafftnbtrou6U 
|rin« bti. Ttt Kltbtutt afltr I'dnbtr ftteben 
banaaj, tint flttinte J.n Jtljt m» btlbtn unb ale 
fold>t ftanbtlnb auf^utttten. Cm unfnb(id>tr 
Wtteinn fiit bit enbfliiiiiat ^tfttiunfl b»t 
«tbeitetflafit . tit llafftnbeioufite tttbcitCT* 
i4«lt, bit £ .gialbemottatit, mttft. rate |$n>« 
t« bah, tin Jrflt ber tb,eottti14en Vutflatuno 
btt tnbifffi nten SHaffen aufjututteln, gum 
ilia^btnftn anguttfltn unb ft« nut Btifjttlfe 
tm RioHtnrampI betdnmittben. Tie(t ttagm 
M 'i jffrrt mQjfen in ©troefluna fltbtad>t rottbtn, 
ibt mattrieuti ^ntertflt roitb t^ntn tin ftt^t. 



batte, fltritbatrt, fie Itrnen emleben, baft 
nut an itttffl li-qt, tbr ed)itf(al ^um SJefferen 
fa MMbM, baft fie $ulfi son «u9ir i; rt« mit 
tnootlen biitfen unb uuift md)t *u triratten 
babtn. 

Tit biitqtiltcben Ctfonomtn etndren bem 
arbtitenben Jtolf. teine Jiotblafle, ftine »u6> 
bunattuna iei tmt ,^!qe bet m mel ptr^m 
litten 9uftsmffl0«. Jlun, bie Ktbeittt n uft. 
mi fltrabtiii au« ben «opf flefnUen 1ein, 
tPuUten fit tuQt antrootlen : Out. lo atbtittn 
mi men-flei bet flleitbbltibenbtm liobn, barin 
icico unftt Kntbtil an bem Hutttnetbrauii 
tin arbfttter toetben. 2Bit babtn SebfiifniFfe, 
aUttrpEbroenbtafte rod) bit qrofte Slenflt, 
t^nnen fte abtt letbet nuitt befnebigtn, ae» 
fibroeiqe btnn in ,-jetttn fltftetflttttt Mtbei!6> 
loftflttit. 

Into) bit prtDat(aptlaltfti(o5e ^tobultion 
^ttben bit Kttbettet fltrabem aebrirnqt, btt 
'iitt'iinunfl btt Htbeileitit aniuuttben. Tie 
vfioa!fapualu:iJa>t Vrobuftion tft bit f)txf 
'Atitbt in alien Multutlanbetn, batum fonnte 
bte Tiotberuna bt* Siojtftitnbeniaflffl nut 
eintm Scblaflt bie (Hrunblaqt be* inter, 
uationalen SJunbefl btt StbeitetflcfTe mtt* 
brn Soma ift btt ^otbetutifl bte Kd>tftun' 
btntaflet bit ?ato!t bet ^Jtolttatitt aUtr 
84nb« fltrootben. H^at bebtutet bit St> 
obttuna, btt K^tfiunbtntaflte noo>t mt; bte 
Btfrtiuna bet HTbtiterfiafitn com btt 
"JobniflaDttet, nber bie (Jcobrruna. wub b t 
SCtfctitttltaflt iu Jiuftii unb in it»tem S)ti 
'reiuftflt!ampif tint ttboett ?t*Sbiaurfl unb 
atoHete SUtbttftanb6<abiq(tit rttleibtn 
i.'anat Kltbfil-i'it it unb a,tnna,et Jietfcitnft 
mu""(n itit Cntnerouna bet fiibtitet fubttn. 
'2tump*ftnn unb (Hletdiflullia'i tt ntuft ft4 
ibtct b'.-TTi.idjtiqt n. ftpaibi'i [offm fte XUte 
ubtt fid) ttaebfii ZtfX mbtn tft tin ftdntutt 
Zttdjtbum. IDo bie Rotb unb ibte i5ntbfb> 
tunfltn ibten (Jinmq balttn, bltibt bas iafttr 
unb bat Stibftojfn auf bit t auerntiSt fern. 
So Itbfrt roit, bati buto> bit iiberindftiqe, 
iaMtmvsfl entlobntt Btfcttttitii bit i'len'djen 
nicftl nut fotpetlidj pfrfummem, lonbern 
aud) ; : TQlrd), ftttltd) otrttiippeln, mm *h» 
fa)aum bet ;\tn<dj(i<it b^tafMlnftn 

lit iSrabtuna. (ebtt qttid)faUB, it funtt 
bit Xrbeittieti, befto bbfett btr i^obn. 3n btn 
rerbdnbtn cbet aud) in ben .itotifloetbdnben, 
in benen fid) bte flibtiitt funt Hrbtit**eit tt» 
runqtn babtn, met btn bte b^djfttn vbbnt bt« 
libit. Sfib. j ubl au* bit Krbeittr tmt toobl' 
tbdtiflt iitttfung aue. Tit ilrbttttr icftbtn 
fidj btfttr ndbttn tf ntien. Sit intrbtn ,^eit 
futben, ibt fflifltn iu btrtidjttn, fid) iUIburtfl 
unb btfftte 3itfn oniueiflnen : rutjum, S3er« 
lanpttt ttaqtu, an btn ctifoVttbf nffm ,->tiaen 
btt Ruttutltben* tb>iliunrbn<tn, tit t&ntn 
btutt ntcjt mtitci alt b^djftene ben 9Jamtn 
nad) befannt fmb. Xte ?!ettut)unq ber 
vtrbtitliett tcirb bte iltbettet erfi tn bit Sage 
i Tftfcen, bte SJobUbaltn btt ffomilirnIiben« 
tn gtnuften, ba^ ibnen btutt butd) btt Ijtigt 
5fttbfil5ifit unb bit Sluobtutuna btt fVraufn' 
unb Htabtraibttt uttfummett unb Detleibet 
toirb, tbntn mt bt <U« VaP, btnn ale tine 
stSetfd) outrun a bt« i'tbtne trfdjetnt. 

i.'adi aUtbttit muft ber Stditfiunbtntafl 
ftatlf n pbnft f <i)« unb otttbtlnb in fitt» 
lidjtt i iif|tWfl auf bit (ItbtitetTlafff mtrren. 
Taburd} nmb bit WrbtitftHafit fin tbrtn 
«efteiunfl«!anipt au* btn ,"v*fftt« btt Vobn* 
atbett bttdbtflttr, in ibrtr MUarmeinbtit bem 
tlntetnebmeitbum tibttkaen iu tpttben. .';adj 
aUebtm fttbt aber aud) auftrr alltm ,',wttfel, 
baft bie ^nriitjiunq bti Xtttftunbtntaat* 
tint 2ftfd)tdnfung bo Untttntbmtrptofil* 
btnuftttr SUttfe bttbttfubttn imift unb foil. 
Ttt Kcbtfiunbentaa. tft nidjt ^totrf ber Vn 
bfittrbfiDtftung, fon^ttn tin SNittel bet ilro< 
paaanba, ben $mt& m trrtid)tn. Tcr 
ftunbtntafl tft ttne (Siappe, auf ber bte Wrbei- 
tttbatatllone fid) (ammetn unb potbettiten, 
in bit <iMui!nti l dK @tftUfd>aft ui itt3tfa)iten. 

Ttretfte^tat tft bat &amiU«iitid)tn bet 
ptoletart'ilnn Setoefluna, wtldjce anbeutct 
baft boo Vtolttanat aller iidnber praftndj 
auf fttn Sifl loofleuttt. Tie Xinbrrfa)ube 
ber Utopifttrti ntuft bie pro let aril d)e Qeroti 
auna abfttttfen. ?torfid>t'tt abet fidjet unb 
ftegt*frob matfdjttt ba* flaffenbtmu^tc 
$tolttaiiat pon fftappt iu dtappe poran. 
v n Lb bet etfte Wat! 

£l. 5?., HUtgUtb btr 
8 o r a t Union ;t7r», 
9leo i)otl. 



"A GREAT SUCCESS M 

Hiiiiilrwl* nt tlnri^itter* pralw itie tout beokl 

HOW TO FRAME A HOUSE, 

•>r ■■f)ii««> •iid Itmil Fr«inlii(£ 
Hv OWKM H. MA*.1N>I- 

[t (« h iir»cik»l trtiallw nn the iKUMt Hud hent 
RlHb<*dj uf InvltiK out) frtuiihiK ^nd m\- nir llm- 
1» r htr licniBfm, loRvtlm with ft Mtiuptotc »nd 
•Mill iiii<liTH|(»irfl Mvalem t,1 K<.«if Krninli. K . the 

wholi iHkM h hantly »i,d en-lly I i>ouk 

f'jr turpBditjm. l.i.Ui fi f r.-ni«ri kfiH journeymen. 
VUS l KNTM -Purl I. 

Chapter I. fiern-rnl il>-«crl|<Uuii tit lUllooo 
Frmmx, Frmnwt M1IN hiuI t he, r conpit ruction. 

ri,»|)tt-r II Klr«t Clour J*e*tnF> or .Iol»t», Mtory 
Hmioim Ht-miid Kloor H. am- HtiliUllfiK Fraru- 
ln K of [)i,..r *i>.| Window Upenln K <i. Well f Jates 
mid t;....f Timber*. 

Ck*M*r III. I.n,vlit K out hi., I WorkltiR Hul- 
Jihiii WHUam, <Hr<U-r*. HtUa, fmiUeriil HI lidding, 

fiiepN-r I V. I^vIiik Mil First mn i Hecond 
Floor JolHta or Heemii, ;«li!rn{ Joints end Wall 
Flatfla. 

Cimpter V. IjiylnK out and Framing the 

Km f. 

f'ha|.ter VI tUIalng. 

I'AttT II - Framing " 

<'li»|.o-r I i'. - 

t:ii»|.nr II Hij.ai.-I V*lla« Itowra 
< l>H| ,!< r III Ho,.f- of Irri'KH'ar I'lan. 

Chapter IV Fynunlda! i!i..«r- 
chapt^r v HeBNironNl KtH»f«. 
riiapu-r VI (Tonlfal -.rf'ii-uiar lt..of-. He , ate, 
fAlir IN 

Ho* to Prauii' ihf TimNrra for a J(rl>-k Hoil«e. 

ChaMer 1 denefal Iteonlpltoa Fl»l Htwy 
Ft ra proof Flotiri, Hiudcinc mid Wood F.oor 
iU jiiua. 

i hapit-r II lipcrind ao.l Uppar Story Baaiw. 
Fartit.ona, Hridtti " a and A mj.nar Franiltj« 

Chapter III. Flripr(M,nr.K Wou.l Kloor-. 
I'aftll n and Iii»'ir.> 

Chapter IV. Ito'tfa, Hu Lk head** and FrrinH, 

Chapter V Wood and Iron Cnn-tru* lion. 

Ciiapii r %'l M'-avy Beama arid tilrdrm and 
llalalkg San.i- 

Cliapti r VII. How to Frariu- m Cahln. 

Tin- work l» tllualrBted inti emplalued hy over 
"I larae ei.Kravlo«« of brjuaea. roufa. etc, and 
noii n d In eloth, 

Pit H K, OXI.V - - WM 

ALSO 

"roof framing MADE EASY.' 

Tid- aplomffd (wink cfjuUInn T. cbaptan aud 
75 ei.Kravlnga and covera the eulltr aubject. 
[la prtie 1a only ft UQ. Bound lo cloth with kilt 
title #•( y Carpenter ahoulil iiave tine. 

K pnactlcaj and aaativ com prebend rd ay Hem 
of laytni OlM and frattifnii roofa adapu*d to mod- 
ern tuil hi 1 1. k cnriatrui'tlon The methiala are 
madr dear a id tiilelll|cih)e wltb eztenalve ex- 
planatory U-Il 

Send Caab or IN ait I >fl'u» Ordt r to 

OWEN B. riAUINMS, 
lie Weil i a8th St., New York Ctty. 



Hight-liour Cities. 



Rrli w i- a li»i nf the ctlie* atl'i towns where 
ci.n'e'ite'- alofct U a rule to w^rk only eijihl 
boun a .!..* I 



Alameda, Cal. 
A U karaM 1'rx. 
A«h:.»ud. U>. 
Austin, in 

Rtartahrld tal 

Bedford I'ark, N. V. 
Herkrle> , t- a] 
Hea-emer Col. 
Hn K htotl I'urk 111. 

Brooklya n v. 
Caroodelet, Mo. 
CHic«ko 111 
Chii-HKLj lleixhts. Ill 
C levels iid, (>. 
Coroni, N. V. 
Cripple Creek, Col. 
Denver, Col. 
Dei roil, Mich. 
Kail I.nuii.. III. 
Kl l» is. Col 
Kltnliural 111. 
Buttle wihi. I, III. 
Fiiieka. C..I 
Hv.iualoti 111 

Flushing, n v 

Fremont, C^ol. 
Fnauo Cal 
*t vest on, 1>i. 
ilettr Col 



I 

c... 

C.rau l CTOsalai, III. 
Ilnilkll ville I (lit . 
Ilaiif tril. I al 
Hi«ulnn,l Prnrk, 111. 
Hitchcock, ir» 
Hvde i-atk. ill 
loilepcadeacr. Col. 
Indiana polls, Did. 

Ii vlUKt on. N !. 
Kiuisitit Cllv. Mo 
Krilinl Kt. n. 111. 
Klo(*b ridge, N. V. 
I, a Inula Col. 
I. alt" Kore-t. 111. 
I.e ulville. Col. 

l.oiin Island City. N. v 

tot AllKelea. Csl. 
LiTM, Ma as. 

Maywood, ill. 
M amp liia, Ten n. 
Milivjiuki '•. Wta. 
Ma irelnnd. 111. 

Vernon, n. v. 



Ml. 



Mt Veruori, Infl 



Murphynoro, III, 
Newark, N J. 

New Bri(hlon v. Y. 

Newlown, N V 
New York N V 
i laklaud, Cal. 
i i.i k Park, III 
Omaha, Nrb. 
1 1 range, N. J. 
Oursv, Col. 
!'a»aoena, Cal. 
I'ort Kichinond. N. Y. 
I'uehlo, Col. 
Randabnrg, Cal, 
Rochealrr, N. Y. 
KoHers Park, (It. 
Sacranifiito, Csl. 
Ball Lake. I lah. 
ban Anlonto Tea. 
San Hran Cisco. Col. 
San Lull Oln*po, Cal. 
S:in Jnae. Cal. 
San Kafiiel. Cal. 
Sauls Ilnrlinrii Cal. 
Sesltte. WWh 
Shelioyuan Wis. 
S.mih Chicago, III. 

^ouih Denver, Col, 

South Kvanaton 111, 
South FtiRlewui>d. 111. 
Souili tltnahi. Neb, 
Mpokane, \\ a»h. 
HprlngBeld ill. 
si. Loads), Mi. 
staph-ton, N Y. 
siocktou. Cal. 
Swampacott, m«*s. 
Ryrscoae, f[ v. 
irm Ciiv, Tel 
Town ol i.ake, III. 
Tiemont. N Y, 
I'nioupotl, N. Y, 
Van Neat, N. Y, 
Venice, 111. 
Victor. Col, 
Waco, Tex. 
Washington, D. C. 
WealcheMt r. N. Y. 
Whatcom, Waah. 
Willismaliridge. N, Y. 
Woodlawn. N. Y, 
Yonkers, N. Y. 



Total in, r iclt(es. 



t vins psimyrrn' lauku, 

"ggftSv This I,»U.| I, 

aaJKaaV', * " — i 1 under 
flLAI M { >nulh..rilyofU.« 

Intent *tt«i nnl 
Typ,, K rai>h i. itl 
Viilnn niul of that OetBMil TytM'Kraplija. The 

I" »«*»<l on all DSwUpAJMI |„, olt Wllrk 

ItalM iiya IsMH Itio iiaincaiid location of where 
tbe printing work Is done. 



Constitution for Building Trades 
Council. 



amcx*i. 

SetTIOU t. This orsanl/atlnn shall be known 
aa tb« AmalKuniatt-O Council of the Hiilldtug 
Trades. 

NxC, 2 "I l.i — c onneil shall he • <un \- i-.-d of dele- 
Kati-a Only choai li from sP -ociclli a in the luilld- 
Ittg tradfH. » ho almll, before being ailtnliled, 
ntealuco i rcdi ntliils aliened by lli" prenldt-nl nnd 
recording secretary t>f Ihci r society , and s isll 
i .'. . • the ,l i of their union attached. 

Hex. 8, In i-Hso of a set ret society , the deal of 
the lodge altucbed slutll be a sufllciont guarantee 
of their genuineness 

Htr 4 Th.- oltiiera of thia society shall consist 
of a, chHlrinau, \ u-e-cliairruan and reeorfitng sec- 
retary, corresponding secretary, linaucial secre- 
tary, treasurer and sergeant at arms 

SKc 6. The chairman and vice-chairman shall 
he elected at em h meeting, and shall be nomi- 
nated from lii-li'gstea of dl fTerent societies, nor 

shall any chairman sit in judgment on any case 

■Heeling the union he belongs lo. 

Nx<\ 6. The recordl ng secretory, corresponding 
secretary. Dnancial secretary, treaanrer and ser- 
geant-at-arnia si... !«• elected misrlerly ; the re- 
cordniK sec etary shall receive such salary as 
this council shall deem advisable. 

ABTRl.E II. 

Bxr-Tiijai I, The executive functions of this 
Onnnctl shall ts« vested In the otlU*rs and dele- 
gates while in scsspiit, and in such coiuinitleee 
as I his i (juucil rnay H url neta-saary to conduct Its 
business under tL a c u nstllutloii. 

Sxrr 2 The objects of this council shell he to 
centralize the Untied efTotU and tipenence of 
llie various societies engaged in the erection and 
alteiHtlon or tiollttlnga, itml tout they may form 
one common i-iiiiiicll , hi id u hh con, iouo Intetcat 
lo prevent thai which may be it^jurinus, aud 
properly p«-rh-. t, and iwrry into effect that which 
they may deem advantageous lo themselves, nnd 
for the coiuuicTi good of ull. 

flr;c. 3. All trade nnd labor societies repre- 
sented in l his (ouricil, when desirous of making 
a demand for either an advance of wages or an 
ahrtdgeinciit in the hours of labor, shall, 
through II ieir deb-gales, report the mine lolbis 
council prior to Ihe demur rt being marie, when, 
if (••incline,! in in iitvvo tliirrlsvote of all the 
sod el l.s pro e nt, at any slated meeting, the 
action ahuli lie hindn,!,' This section shall not 
prevent any society from acting on lis own re- 
»|Kjiielhiiily. 

AlTICLg III. 

Sxr-riON I. No trade shall be entitled to more 
Ihaii U>r e votes on any question thstdireeily 
affcris the maleriai ItiP real- of any trade society. 

Sxr, 2. All trad, a or *(*-lelle* represented 4ttnll 
be etititlerl to three delegates. 

Htr. 3. Any socle' v having three or more 
hramlies shad be entitled to i 



car.li branch. 



tST ll.K IV. 



Hrrrios 1. Any lrs,lc or society represented 
In i Ills council that luav desire material aid, 
shall stale their case to this council, and, if ap- 
prover! by the d, l.- K a;ea. ahull hrlng the matter 
lieforn their respective orgunlialioua for iuim(r 
rl hiie action, 

ARTICLE V, 

SK(-rfN 1. It shall i>c the s|M-cial duty of this 

in 11 to nw the united strength of* ell the 

societies represented therein, tu eoiu|>el all tion- 

umuti men aud "scabs" to I". ■ r 1 1 > lo, and 

ohr»v ihe laws of. the society thai they should 
prn|icriy belong to. 

Skc. 2. It shall be the duty of any trade or 
lata>r society to use every iawlul means to in- 
UUce all UOO- Union Men or scat's to become 
members of tlu ir rcaperlivc un inns, and any 
trade society failing in their juat ctlorls, ahall 
bring the matter In fine tins council through 
their delegates, wbh all the fact* tn the case, 
w llli the names of ihe nu n if possible, where 
employ ed, aud the name of the employer, the 
same to be presented In wn Ling, w ith the signa- 
ture of the president of the society atfer-ted, 
when this council shall lake immediate action In 
the mailer, and if ibeiur-d advisable, this council 
may, by a tw»-thiida vote of the delegates then 

preswnl forming a quorum, order a withdrawal 

of airy or al I trades or * ictr-lles who may be on 
any b Pding where said non-union men or 
scabs may be employed This order shall Ins 
carried Into c fleet I h rough the agency of the 
Muatiit aa Ageula of the various societies, 

all Tlr l.K VI. 

H«ni<"r i. All sraiMies represented in this 

com ii-ii -hali pay the sum of two dollars each per 



AKTIr I.n VII. 

Hrr-rum I. On demand of a nubtti represented, 
a gcucial sirike shad be orrlercd lorr'bistate a 
mriula-r or uo tnU r» » ho Pave slrru a uml art 
refused employ meul on the job I hat u,ia struck. 

Mgi 3. AnyHusiness A«ent or Agcnta of any 
socletv ordering a sirike without the consent 
of this Council, Ihe trade be r«prest!nta shall 
lie henl rt stKiusllile for the wages of the men on 
strike. This shall not prevent an Agent f'om 
ordering a strike of Hie uiemta'Ts of the society 
lie represents to adjust Cs own Internal itltalrs 
without the aaaiahiiice nf tbl« council. 

Hue 3. Members of a Unlnu sc reding from a 
parent organ last leu and forming a separate 
union shall be deluded from this council. 
Hue. rl. All branches of a union shall demand 
rami Ihe snme huuiaof la 



atancia nn 

1 1, when the member* of two unions 
represented lu this couueU work at the same 
liade, It shell be unlawful fur one lo lake the 
pla, r- of the olbur u lien ou strike. 

imn n IX. 

RaOftM 1 tin soclelv or branch of a society 
shall he allowed to aiiike mure than one em- 
ployer st a lime, unless there are two or more 
emplnve-a on me same job. 

ABTK I-n X. 

HBiTlOW I Two-lhlrds of all the trade 

a, I In this m il shall form a quorum 

sg.- J Ii shall lake two weeks' nolle* of 



10 



THE CARPENTER 




■■„. 

Its 



.'IS 

HI. 



I 1: i v ST* R 



AL VB VMA. 

l-SSLI V. 

Moniui ''< French ••■) Ch irleatoa -t 

COt, W, Lewie. 7 I Ssl I. mil- st 

ARKANSAS. 

Has i t i i vil l i — K. M. Cant 
FT. *»NUTb— It. Ku <! car. Nfe ami Q t 

CA LI TURN I A. 

At-AalSOA CM i'mane. jb<7.\ Ichneonaet. 
UMAKiii 1 , < s tii iv, Boa -VI 

OAKLAND CiMtl J . Jaiolis, >~ 'OnyMll. 

Kivi.KSirth~cii.is> In. mutton. -7? 6th at 
San I'KAXi'is,.' -i ctaryofliisl Council, 

Win. J. Ktdtl 220 -l 
N. I.. Wandcll, II .;' Mission at., st.i It 
(Latin 1 i. Maaane. 1 1 1 .. Ki it at 
(tier.) wm jilg*, tt 1 1 1 iwworth 
Guy t . . i * 1 '. * ' ' ' i \ Market *t. 

s\N 1 i-( W I Wilcox. • W ln'.M St. 
s a\ Kai Al l J. J. Shell-. BOS I' I 

CANADA. 

i;kas i i Dun- 1. \v. tor, im Terrace Mill . 
llniu\,N.S.-i.io lirnwue IJ Willow sl. 
KamiI roN— W. J i i ui, Nelaoa st 
Months u ii-'i 8. Kitchrtie. 17;>i St. 
Catherine 

Allan Kntnsoy. 157 Ojuranel St 
R vt I'ok i v<. r, ti\i. J.is.1. Maizetli. 
BT. C.s rm kini - (sine* Miii.Im.hi, llmsv at. 
T m iXTO— 11, I> McNeill. »•* Hatubitrg see. 
VAMCOCVBB, It c AllreJ I COfBll, ILIJ 

Richard si. 

mil. WiXNlPBO, M \s. K. Hell. 7ti SchuH I -i 
COLORADO. 

Ml Rori.iii.K- R, Liiidbiry 

ijI.i. Colo. M'ki-.,,s- 1-raut. >avvver plk H.vtel 
CBli'l-t.feCkhr.K— stv of I) C Box S, Maan 

p. O , ludi pendence, Col. 
cruti.i: CKi.i.hL-w.il. Rmuh.Sftu 1-:. Mycri 
Ui-iNVKK -I.. B. Rteder, 1 :!2 California at. 
Ki. Don A— J. M. Rerun. 
lMiKfEMii..\i,i - l\ \v Reid. Macon. 1'. Q 

IiOS .1. 

Oi'rav— p. H. Shue l.ox alfl 
Victob c. K. Palmer, Bok iw, 

CONNECTICUT. 

BhII) IBPOBT— 'AgMUUB .Mulllns 



IM. 

it.::, 
id. 
sua 



Ml |. 
IVl 

lilt. 
.>■- 



II 

M. 

Is 
l» 

37*. 

2£* 
,,s 
•-'7. 

t.|7 



.VI7 

-*i i 

17». 

jr: I. 
»s| 



115 



! '.'. A utus 



iti.Knv— r.eo. H. Lamp rl -i'> Hank st. 
Mar 1 1 null A,lcx. McKay, St Wooaier m 
Nsw Britain- A. i.. lohnaon.tl* Fianklin. 
Nkav iiavi.n- Win. VViUob, .'sis. Chapel tl 

NKW I.umion A O. Kctuei 1 W. Cull kt. 

Nokwich i-\ s Kdmonda, Central arc 

NOBtt iUt— -William A. Krllotr*. Box.tt'l 
BTAMPOBD K. B. McMil'- i. 17'. Pacific, M 
TokAikotom Craa Stvwalt, 17 ftoreat a| 
Wati.khikv— j s. ij. Saudi ford, s s vuie. 

DISTRICT OP COLUMBI A. 

l!«t. Wasium.i.i.n T. Keovon, Ml", kho.le 
fttutO hvq , .M \v. 

FLORIDA 

BM }AVUOMVIt.Lk- (Col i J 



«7 
7H 
1 tl 
117 
748 
210 
.'n. 
SOU. 



74. 
BW 



«:i'.'. 
■;iii 
1!1U. 

in 

Ml. 



bampaooi M W. 
cnioa s,t. 
" A. C M.. Salt, 815 K, Chareh at 
Pus-SACotA -J A. t.vle.iilii'.. w. Zawaaosaa 
TAMfA-C. it. MeMcr, SttTfatttpaXl 

OEORUIA. 

A 1 1 ami A- T. Ii. J. Muler. 16 Vei.ah:,: M 

Ai-oi»rA-lCoL) t V U»wi« law iMiiin, -i 
W. M. Hare, ««T Watkins at. 

kt ^* 



bVi Marion— i M. Simon* UK' K Aheimanat 

' M'-si-ik — II 1'. Hiket II- > I : an kin, HI. 

I1JSI >.TIII 1IKM> (ieO, \\ i n 'II, 

All rKSHB liAt'Tk— K. W. !•)■ yd IMM : ! ivr 

ink. VtNCKNNaa— Levi Taylor, IJiti Party -t 

.'Jl) WaR.unuton — Jr» Kamtiev. |r.. a S.K 7tli It 

INDIAN TI: RRITORY. 

ItVJ Ml skih.ki.-J IV llxnitier. 

IOWA, 

Ma BiHVNH i; I.. Mctttroy. 

.;; lit KUiai.foK i u. i. km. in iWAs Centra I «*, 

.us cati >k Kapiim 

ui pwkm.i ii nr. -oinvriict, i i.t uttcbal 

ll*i Ui sMuiv V s- ItAtttfle) li*H !-! -I 

i.Tk ttcMt'Qri m k lloaari. A*> «tb at, 

-M K is i no:. lit - A S !• nkiii* 

7>.,. i . 1 1 1 mm a i w. Morrison, 319 w Htftbtt, 
KANSAS. 
ah..i ntink- m Mnrpht Hm;n: 
. - Kansas Cit> <*. McMtillin, **i Mancti 

llonlrva'd. 

l" I.k.wi ku.'urn- jno. V, Ctvaslay, '.li *n. I 
Shcraisa. 

i « Topkka— A M. tt. Claud) KK Tyler »t. 
-• I Wichita i i. Taytor, > linage at, 

KENT! CM. 

71.' CoviNi.ToN— C I'.latlinii I «'.' K.ivaiidllKa -1 
TstS " (Oar.)H. Kani|Meti. SKiW. llithM 

Its Hoi kisisvti 1 1 - w ii iui! 

ItB i.i >t ik\ u i v. ii > HoftaMn 17X7 (iailsRbar 
-tl (tin i J ikcbneider. Il'hi h |acob«v. 

lata Kkwpokt— w. K Wing, ttv Cent tal m 

LOUISIANA, 

Kkw (iBLSANS— Secretary ml Pha CoitMll 
F, ti Wrtur SSSO lo*ephttic -t 
7m Aug, Limberg 71 1 Koucherst 
7ui p Uunrkop, HIT >. .i.li/ si. 
"•IM m foaqntB, liltH sst Roebe ae« 
-si siiki vi i - i. Malkusi Boa IW 

MAIM'. 

2l**i liAtil-F C PlumOlei y: Iir'imm | 

W7 l.i aistiiv-C r'. Maker, ill liiuiei »t . 

Aaburn. 

MARYLAND. 

St, balmmokh-w . ii. Kaaaan, IMBU', Ua1 
herrv s>t. 

ti. " (Cer i it B, Bcbroe4tr, S3* canton aea 
MASSACHLSblTS. 

ltukTON - st.Tttiu u| 1 si st . Council, C M 
Uempaey, ZT- Mnuliau St. 

33, " C, J. Callagber, a Raad Fl Roabary 
Jlk. K. Bnsr.is -C. M. Uriii'. >ev -TJ Meridian at 
•£M KALL Klvt-.k -I»ia it l)i .in, !■ -' sui! Ik a| 

sj lUvKKiiii i.- R, A t'lsrk. ' Uudlrj it. 
I.'t Minoham.— R. K Wbarily BoallS. 
l-t HotvoKE— V. Marcbaa ', »■ c tin i m. 
in Hudson— <ieo. K. Bryant, Mm 12S 
IM. i*AWar.Nca- Win, C. Gemmrl l7Cro»byn| 
t7i I.kn.ix -P. H. cunnaxan. Boa -*7 

ti i.mvai.i.- Frank a Kapplei --<i Lincoln -i 
SUI, M.taai.BHkAr>— K M Roach. H Kim ct 
fit M \ ki.ii. no •— J l>. Uouohue. 117 School kl 
N ' N» v BantsoBB— >C O. ht-.tici- JIM North »\ 

27.j Su in-, c |..l - I T-, KS W t-t kt 

I ti. Xvktii r\nAMS~0. w. Houghton. I Kvon » 
Line. 

Mi I n i-i ii LO—Chas ii\de. 14 Booth'* flaw. 
67 k. ixiii ks H. m Taylor, Uo Whitfield si 

Dorc hekter. 
W7. Sr> Pit 4 Ml.su it s \t 

tO BPhlBOPtBLO— ( hrenrh) P 1'i .vost Jr llo» 

W5, Mcrnck 
'77 p j Colltn* I M , rslat< «t 

-'J-' WwrniMi M. i; 1'i.ii.rrov..*! Chrktnnl k|. 
f»a-riK-W.t K'.k.it-v'..iCity View v*. 

M1CHIUAN. 

Atl l.NA-lt Is K-llv. Hi. I'HWakM 

BavCitv K O.Gatca, 2I» N Rirneyat, 
CbBS. A. Kiclilrr. Is; i i -I 

Uhtkon t », Jordan. C27 BeauUtl are 



4:t:t. 

70 

tit. 
41. 



1. 
in 

1.1. 
21 

si. 

■Vs. 

mi, 
-•u. 
im 



Macon--, s. Boiioh. >.n i-,mi -i. 

VAi.iHskT.i-S. W. Hooker. 

IDAHO. 

Wali.ack. 

ILLINOIS. 

BBLLBVttuo-Ueury Btttoar 005 & m,, ,„„ 

sticet. 

BxioHtoN Paek—O. Oration, aarjs s 

Alfjany Ave 

Canton— J c Otto, S«3 Soatb 2nd ara, 

Ciiam|'aii,> j.,k fti. ArmHjuioii ^ui w 

Hcalyst. ' 
CiiiCA.,o-!>ecretaTy of D,-tricl Onuneil 

» ?.'"?■, Ne . iile , lh A K «- '<'"'»' 7. 

w. O. Hchardl, IM»K. VVakhitiju'iisi Booms 
J. 11 SU-venk. ml»i p tl)r j H M M 1 ■ <,, ' J,,I - 
1". ;. [.i-livclt Kill Pi 11 more M 

French) P. m u ,i„„. 20! 0. Center av< 
llohein. i John Ulbuhy.l2^2W 21 1 
Wiliiani VV. itennettf Illl. KOHcoi si" 

(gc«n )J.C Johnson KH . s Waantcaaw arc 

tOer.t Heriuaiiii Voell, IKL" , j-., u |i na si 
Jan Belli latOW, laill Ft 
Jill. (iVir I John rkiicktau, r.,i s iiaklevasr 
..2 (StaiiaiCiii*. Hsna«n,7i_N Rockwell sl 

AM lisi I i.i m Jus M<, rK i.ii 

XH&. Colmnsvili r - |o« vujtecb, Loch iioa 171 

2BH, DANVJLLB— at A, KOKCfa, V COlumhua u, 

Kw. hAsr sjr Louis- X. Wcndiinu 612 m BV( . 

KN HI. Is woo it -A. Wiktrom, i.|,,i Atseuler,, M 
SBft OALKSHUKO C J. Jnhimmi kT!i Was),',, m 
Ml. (,kis. Cuoasi.M.-J Mui:»v.l2!«K.7latal 
17* Jui.lKi -Q U Kan iijv, iHI.1 ki, hinoiid si 
111. lvl'.,SisslNi;Tr)K-tFr, y Kd. I.niKjIi,. e, 211 W 
J J 1st ll sit . 

153. l.KWANKB— Ch*H. WitKlllikt, D X II 

-'■ill I.aki, I'ohksi — Chaa, Ijean Boa tly' 
J7i» Madison— J P. Pat ley, lion' 111 
Itlli MolINe — John Carlson l-llli 7i Ii »i 
HO. atOBBLABtO—Jat. M. I'.i i n t , .Ml I Ho'iiroesl 

Chicago 
JH0 Mi. Oi.tVH — John Shreier. 
is.1 kmikia— J. if. Kice, tlt't liehreiid* ave 
IUA, Paar -il. J. tialdesctsnseler ,'iox ... >i s 
lt», ijcikjt-V-F, W. Kusclier, IKWi., hdi -t 
IMi KoCK Ih.ANIi -Wi»i Krurger, Jr., 1 111) 111, 
Uttl SitOTil Chil acss-J C ilianthtiiii, SKUi p,j. 
wards are,, si a. S. Clin a«o, 
Si-k isii;fikmi~T M lltattkfiikhlp 72ls Mth 



MV 
114, 

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OaANDRAPItM-A Van D.kr t;| o u ,„.„„. 

' Boa 1 1 si 



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Stkhator— Kdw, Keaake UUs Biooniar. 
Ion at. 

UN. WAUKKOAN-J. netnercat, 7: Joiuityit, 

INDIANA. 

3i2. ANDitHSON-Gco. Woodinauser. Wt* S. Mail 
ave. 

liTsS, Ktwoon-W. H Shaw, 1,'IjO S. A, st. 

Wt. KVANaviwa— f W Klein, illl Kdjjar sl 
213 it AKTPO* II Ctrv-I. O. Ilaull. 

00. l»tnANAi-oi.ta-i(ier ) Jno. p;iaet, Ihji siii- 
;J-trtn »t. 

. " J. T Coode, :*K VV. Maryland St. 
SU& L AF ArBTTB - M. G, Cole. 211a South St, 



li tNCOCk L 'Uik Veirllle 

K.VI.AMA/iO- 

II ; Munjsinii A. L. Johiisxin. 

I'M MVSKKUON Hatlev W. Marke II Marsh II 

6», Baoinaw F FrlScn. aOEi Ward al P; h 

331. " Jacob splndlei. 132:1 Mackinaw ft, 

Hi Mi'i.ts r , MARIK-A BtowelI.2K2F wit, 

SCM Fbavbbm Qn\ John J. Tiadale,aik7thrt, 

MINNESOTA, 
lit.l IIULUTH-John Knot, Boa2SI, w Dnlnth 

7. Minnbapiius- Hvantna stsibte, 2Srt I •'( 
'-'•'ti RBO La kb Palis ,V. .. TK . 
"7. sr, Fat'L— Neis |ohns B,7W .Vinrtin -t, 

MISSOURI. 

I Kansas ClTV - H. Thavn, :u, \v .'in, ,i 
lln sr [iisosi'ii — Win. Zitisinetisi.tii. )Jl' , \ lr|(h 
.st. Loots— BaeWari nf Instnct Cnuncil 
K Kiielle. DDI Msrkrt M, 
'i (Oer.)Wtn Lamnurt IftlBLaniiai 
I > tOer.i w. Wamhoff, Itltl Montaomety at 
17,(0 riA Hoflbtann, 2121 \irtnr»t. 

'.i Geo. C. NewflMn J**3 K. 18th sl 
Sh. j. a. BtelBingrr, 3»JSW Lucky -t 
:.;s [Btalr Bldrs.) K4* BrtiggcBWBB.Sffitt Mailt- 

MONTANA. 

Anaconda -c. w smir. Boa -i* 

Hi.i, i — Anilrue KekftaoB, 

Bitttb Citv c. i Nugent, Boa ttB 
tlBKAT FAtt.s— ti M. Lambert Ih.k !rj:i 
... Hm.kna-M P. Smith lll'.p.ilh ave. 
2a, Mis.stn-i.A- U.C Fepplc. 

NEBRASKA. 

f-'7 i s m a s i a J. H. Maua, Mil 6. 2Htb >l 
W9, s. Omaha- P, M. Conn ell, ."ill n i -« M 

INI- W JERSEY. 

740, Aatroatt p.,kk- wm. H.Carr, Bob bpi 

Wi. II A von nk- P. A. Miller I.i !■ M Ht 
IM, llKIl,..l^To^ J. H. Keeves. MV Payette ,t 
Camobn-T, ft, Feteraon, t;*J Wafttrt w ' 
in. ■ OHAsiiii-l„ p sherrer. ai Iieillo,,! M 
m. Bu-tABBTR-H Zimmerman 2W sonth 

,. M.er.|Johu Knhn llsi.niv.r.i 

m. Hack, n sack -T. Heath. HI2 I'nio " 
m. H....OK..N A Crolh.rs. llil Jaekaon at. 
m, ( r,er.) H Sievera, flH) Monroe M 

;.. IBVINOTON-CW Van Wett 
130 jBBBarT CtTT-Joa 0. Hum. 140 Com,..,.,,, 
I'aw ave. 
Jno. Johnson Ml IL-oariway 
( Frames s) IIenti,tu Paati IK) 
Willow iv lloliokeii 
m . ' '"- ,{ v "". lM ' Ninih at. 

lV, u ltv U r',t M JO,, " « , « d « rf t North at. ami 

LONO BSANCB—Chaa B, Hrown Boa 211 
Lour Ilnsnch Cty. ' ■ * U ' 

M't.tti'Ms j h. Wfaic, flbaet mia 
30S. Mn.i.vN. t . K -jas. McNtal W \W. Main si 
laa »JO" TC '-*'a-jsa Mci.eod.ni Forest it 

H«. Morhihtown-C. V. Deals Lock ; Ik I IMS 



2>.'. 

at 

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I A. 



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IIP, M. <; Long, lOlhtvia st , K N.«aik. 
I-M (tier.) Fred Ti !• s i>th -i 
M-. Hi mi Henri. i>7 Warerly at, 

> t i A L Hi enle I2U N J.I t 

7.': c .--f *. Atetidi, -vs| s*|srtng6ehl ire 

iii uk r. .i m Morlnrk, 17 I'atliinsou Tei 

lit. PATKasu.N p. »• Van Houieti 7 1« V. .'7ti, kt. 

|*i r.-si.. \ Uaimby, tW Mouiw"tnesy 

in l i a 1 H Ami . s W II li.il h • I • « i- -t 

1'ilti i I pad I HI, W s i .at M-. hi - l-.* \ * I le -1 

I'i.aini it. i i> - Win II Lungei, IM \\ist.,- 

1 1 it are,, x I i.i u,l: el l 
Fbknton j I kourkr StiMaiketai 
I'NtoN Hit.i ,*.ii J. Wuriachek, 721 Adam 

-t H.. Ik. kin 
SF Wks) 11 EN- 
NEW MEXICO. 

aw Ai am i.nki.n 

NEW YORK. 

271, At t'ASV- L, » !Urve\. IW Id st. 

ti , i ii ,ii i \\ hi i i rauklm i «t Klk si 

i, \ \| - i t K i . im - l.e-te! Ci Vi v. JO M .Hs.it St 

1 1 1 aimkn I- B. Koon. tin Franklin ai 
h » i v.ik i s i i.,.; i, Its Haievaier arr 
RiNfiKAMpritm F w Sickl i ^Htabat, 
i:k"n v S'Cfetary of luatiict Council, A F 

K^iih. i * s ut h m . m i Wrnon, 
Brooklyn arcretarj o| l)i*irict Counirtl, 

K. F M ism i ii ".' i .'i h at 
i nt, i /nt.iij i tXi I la Kali, svf 
ilSer Call. Mk t« l \btati.ini Bau (j.irlm t , , 

Harnbure air 
K in robin til scbeark are sub-^ita 13, 

M I i a-i , s. \rssell -l 

C. K Blown, 2TJ Itowsvd ave 
W F II tktwick . . KocM ,,^ -t 

ens ii. Monroe ij >i M. ok'* ave 
^I S(iei>cr .i. Ma- i-oii ki Hiooalyn. 
H.eri F Kraotei us Hambait are, 
s K Klltott, 1.10 sst Mark* ave. 
w :n Carroll, TVS He'gen at. 
II S i i.ii bei l|Ni ; ah -t. 

I Ok Mitchell ,11 Mm 

D yPAi.ii s. retary ol Utatrtct CouacU 

Miles Little, 17 Ho day al 
W. II Wi ttt«itt, 7k l-.lwai.l -l 
(let i (tin, i.t,.-l. .... l)„»t ,i 

I- ii Vokotn, in :i ave 
i ii m, era, s , Laintan kt 

Conor* -A. Van Amain _*.' I Seoi ^e *t 
COLJ Kill POIM1 U A. I'll ki 1 ,n.-«» l 

llth kt. 

Pin Niicbawa 1 K..hi Muleey, Boa . ii 
FtailKtl.1 ON'lltTHUtN IV W.Kowe H a 21.1 
F(.t7SHiN<i F h Field I'.l New l..*iiki .t 
f,i\r.\ \ i;.W IMdaott, SB Holtentieck see 
its- i mi- i- | A'htte, F) Cage arc 

llBMrsrl At' ». 11 Chester l:.n*_' 

lavix N--k...* :t Brown, iu-tinK*oti 

Ititdsi n 

I I ii tc \ i \ \\ hitittfl s » abot ii -' 
I IMKSTUM - is Is Smith T'l I se, and ki 
Kis-.s, « ; .i job o Ft i rahay.roi | 

ave Sets Vol c i Ity 
K i NtiBTOB K i Peterwm. SB7 Smith aee 
L; t .i s Pvi i - i k Mangaa IUW Moa 

Lock i 'at n \' — 

i ..in., i-i n; ctri w Futtaaa til Jamaica 

«Vr. 

Ml VbBBOK— A H Parker .'. ■ Bj J.it.r ti 
tiVeiillr 
f.ls llr.n t-.'S I S .;h «ve 
Nt a m'B»". - 1 hit i rm\ el ■:, 1 .■> K^nwi V, 

N w Rut lit lu ' '. i la an »• Birch at 
Nuwtuwa i 1 h t-i a Inderaan Rot 1 . 

Cui »a N V 
St a v iuk -.secretary ..f ntatrtct Coatgctl 

it F Fe it heratoN u* \\ u ..; -t 
I I llewiit MS l l i kt Core Net in 
l-'tooi Layet* [. Heiaer, ill Stnnwaj «ir 
L. I vi y 

I'li i- P. I c sir-man 7x-nthavr i" .rr *.! ,-> 
tewiah '.hit OoUlfarfa sl K tl-hhat 
Uet Cab M-ikei- *>imon Kuehl,22t l*t av 
li Van .rri„rk 1 p a I : ;,l -■ 
rter.) F W Mac let . ; i- i | ,i 

ii Berruom iss ft 
i scan i ' s. w illia, -'I w 1 wi, » ( 
lOei , Vin. fit ftAutrr. 43 i s irtlaa I avr 
fss M iRuiie Itelantevst 
Win i'r„tt^r, . - W Is;), . t 

wm K. p sebvrana, - iiruwn . poiai 

As'oria L I 
f J. l'.arj{ri ;II7 UI nv 
lirr | Geo. Betttaol 1,321 I l-'ili 
Jotiii McCratl, I7i p; Undat 

k'.t ) Jti i II. Ilorr*. I ., I ave. A. 

II- r Cana'linn i ''.en Mfii.int, 2U >' Tllh -I 

Chaa. Camp 22i w Haiti *t 

(I'.r-r MillwriRhts and Miller* Henry M.i-k 

:i" Linden -t , iirr. kivn 
Nvask k v Wool, Boa PCI 
ONKONTA C W. Iliiriik.de BWalliagaee 
FBKXHKILL r T Puisell (it, simt.k.n ril 

Pok t> in.siKh- Fraak step-en, ji : Madi. 
son hvi-. 

PoetniiRREraii i 1* ^aeobaon Bor ,■ 
RocitKBtfeE II M Fletcher, ftSnydei al 

(tier.) Frank Schwind I May I t 

Juhll Hnehtle 311 Is ,, hati l aia 
s. in Nti. 1AM Henrv Hum. 324 Craig st 
sia 1 1 s Isi iM, Bretelary Him C->ubi .i 
J w Bheehan I7i iit.,..,i» a> - n/esi Ni w 
linvhion 

POBT Kli II sfM. J KetUSB. SBPl lef.rs .■ 

Near Bitghtoa 

stai'I.i PON F I Klee Boi slo 
Svh ti ' KK sri i. i ny id Itikt i,t . ,,„„, i| 

II C Patke ppnwick avr 
((ler i | K Kv.ii i. . i iebhardl ave 

i i: Bailey, .17 i i Saneaec at, 
ChRk Btlrernai 1 sT2*t Vine at, 
TaoV -Oivtil K<ni Ho* 48 
ITtu-a W, Oriitttha. 2B) fMdley sea 
WATKBTOWN— W, J Millies', i U 1 A, Main *l 

Rii.t Parham 
Wi-:si' in sri:R--Prank y'snderpool, Hlots- 
ih ii see 

Win i i-.h • ( ,Mi--Geii Helton, lios X 

wniiA tk BRiuns— John Kdgtey, White 

liiiiiik av- . Itet. 1st mi l L'uit slk 
VONK BBS— K. C liul*e, 17 Mn pi- *t 

k». m Tallmadge '.'tii p:i ro st. 
NORTH CAROLINA. 

ASMBVULB— Q, C. Luiiiley. ',1 Bl.iBtitn *t. 

OHIO. 

Akmi-n — A, H lidte-. Flu we r*' fou rl 

HkI.I.aiHk-O W Curtis ;^i.is. |i.. m ,,„ M 

KaiiKiNPOBT— John D Glenn itos tl. 

BcCVntTi Wm. kein. B22 R kmsselaei »l. 
Camiihmh.k- V. C Feittosuii B37 K. BtBbeB 
ville use. 

Canton Chas. A. knninel ( ,j2."j N . M c K i n I e v 
ave. 

CiMi'lstNATi -Sei retnry Of IHstrict Cout'cil 
J H Meyer, itt Mrrcrf It 

J' ^Orerbecke, XU Hackhtrry *i., Walnut 



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I H Ltiekey, 21J7 B toon I -t 
CLrVhlANis Secretary ol Dlatrtet Coaaril 

« ii hi Iinl /. Ko. m I An h II«ll vig 
Ontario at 

II I I rt.nlr | k p| , r ,\ r 

it li. tii i V (*•« i aaly, i i |r « - tt *t, 
i i ■ I lie. . Wi Muli Hi Falkei ave 
i Gel i stberi k*i|. t 1 I i»ik air 
Cm i M> * — a C. Welch 1 1 J7 Highland al 
UAATll \\ r Bmtth. I IS > l a tulle st u 
it i .n k 'K u-i ii iii in *i a«e 

i .. i I fa* \\ . 1 1 H . .11 l l, vrt -I 
B. Lll KM .Ne,si-ll illi st 

H Fat taiiNj 

iiis'.i in W c Mnaeh iSFMeatonsI 

Lit** 1 ' I s.,,ri Iii) rkecniiii si 
L»* ki tvn CI. .'li- I Mi ni l lt.ii IffJ 
MABiatfc i W It featet , 2 Wot I 'i lane 
Fti» * I 1 1 U/lll 

p. .ui svi.,i 1 1, . l' riioman, tin Campbell 

ave 

stiiiisviiii i> ii Feteraou 704 Adaau 

i hi in k s itvuiinei Hedge* st 

i it i i > Martin 7 rtwtiticei . n ,.i m 1 



171 

Tin 



avr 

Itlet P 

■A •, \V 
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Pal ui ei 

71 . vURuau -t 

t i nlial air . 



V.n M. t 

/ HIS'. II 

tOth Vt 

OKLAHOMA II. R. 

"ki m i hp n bb i K Mam al 

ORf-OON. 
i'. an a.m. Uweid lit .ictku,!, Pottlani 

11. igbU 

MENNSYEVANIA, 

AMI'. Ill N \ I ' I I \ — 

I \t I lit* ls| yt Rah ll k on me 

J 7 i.i-r i A VAr-/iu , . itfl j ,i |(,|| rM i 
I.. ALLRNtOWN A M M..ve» I " N rtl. I 

-In BkAVaa Pmis a nuns i » t.il v. 
In i ,* Ii 1 1 .ti 

am Iii r,. kiii m I. M Swlnkej 112 Bi Iwai 

s llt-lhlelii III 

ui Br.I'I.irii- W. it M-'.iii .»« i Chat He 
»tf 

• ni k i a Khei s |o K | % hi j | ,(,>, 
K isi'.v Fiank I H'.tt. 'It i i ri >i 
ii ,. mint. .\\n i. Martin i IB f, ls„v.' 

GRKKXhUVBO J H B hi ... CbllCt.tr] 

HtsaisNi at. w lii.tiiier £22 I'ertei al 

II a. i t : n Ch«s -! »ei |i»J W <tak -l 
M is: ttl I- vs.' Kisis- |l 1 Boi i2J 
L AN > k I t u |oa km ltd — \ 1 1 lie -let »t 
N W i isii , C C N , 1 1 . •-' W. •■ •>• 

in, i ii -t 

111 Ms« k.s-[s.,t s s Au'en'-aih 

'.I.-' I i ... r i i \i i Ml krlv* 

I'ltltADat phia isei Inaarl t Cenncil 1 ! ; 

WalMlU * If .ni ri si»s:. . k 

- w , Haii lu. * Niacin ,i i* .i 
Sil Kciuinatuni John Wstai • tsspat il 
siai ton K 

-'.a Hiet , loaeph Oyen k'ts p. artb at 
■•• Mi • ImertBfei H Itani litiDtaagdoa 
l iris Ri.p sweressty ol Ittatitet ( ni 
I i . >ii a !et . J Grant al 

112 H t. s h niAtr: ,;>, Nhrrmsn as' \ esj 
144 i.rt I '.M u I . v. ,,. a\:-\ 

Kudi If. RobertMi t/2 l'tin»«toi* pi 



.71. 



211 



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:i27. 

112* 

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470. 



iG-r.) AuEiiat Wei-s mill IU-*t at. 
(Milt) 11. Brink worth. tHI.'i Sprln B sl , 
A JlriRer. 1221. Per rub at. 
I>. J. Jonea. 2-"J> Kenton st , Station li 
Jon. Lang, Box 2 .1, Cartl.aRe. 



ft W Mc* .im' ,'. i ) ii i , i it (| | 

W J hi. '.ey !HTS| i , . , , t 
1 M Hi, star 1 . I Mayli net ,t 
".t i I. mi. pat kit im luatrr (!»■ 
Wat. I. 

Pi vti ni i: II | !» is ;•, it. t : pi 
> , , , a t.i HnMM 
hi; B *N Ins It. f ■-. I.r e i u-i 

S SCI IS1..S il.rl I -lt„. • I.. (Moil 

siiasi kin li s. I sniii,, «Ti.»r n 

-si • t s I, Cla n 
I ieofic II (Ii Hit 

WilkibBabsi I' * i"»i l7Cim1crellaM 

\ II Air.. . F*l n « 
V IBB— C kinilfttun j a ] N Uttl .1 

RIHH1L ISLAND. 

n Mi .in,- i p i Danrtey 14 Levi- «i 
tlS Fa if. Kir J B Parquet Hoa 1« 
Palls 

'■l F« -s is-. p net .n ■! I. awn 

II. Wikishwkbi.i j v Prat ay M Otvhatit it. 

SOIT1I CAROLINA. 

>.' CitARLR-kTOB (Col ) John Fineafler (IMai 
su Coti mm a <ctii . i a rhompaon, I hit V. 
I *> -1 

SOI Tit DAKOTA 

Hn LB AO ClTl W P McCIIBtBM Iio»7'i| 

TENNESSEE, 

.•' t 1. Kk..N ll I- 11, ..Ian, | » , | « fl », 

• s uit w W. Kamvi tin Fonaba al 

'■ 'ii Minis t .1 is ii MsiTut.eoi Laraaand 

A i.liti ave 
ChM Miller ll» lutn- si 

I i utifht sj Maaaiasaei, 
TLX AS. 

'.'»' Al SMS | )J U, | (, ft, W tllh .t 

t UBBDBNB (A |, Boi KB) 

imr J**i.i s . Win Wathin* Boa 

.li |iisi>,n \v w \, ighbour, i .1 \ w 

i . a n . 1 1 s . 

OAtviama Sec* riant ol iistnn i.,,,niit 

.-'it t I* pt.«- ,,i. i in IVth *• 
HIl.iGei i Chart**-!, Wsllei -ii». \ve M 
III Km in m aboop, «it) csptiol are 
■ "'MSN.,, . it Fayse. 

J " »AK ANTONIO Hies . Ann Kir* ;i J phim 
»' : ,. i ' • Win,. I I t i Cent i e tl 

t.-'J tt tCn A P. ttl lllirr rjlli .1 Hall 

UTAH. 

IM I am i.aki Ci ii - \ Tracy, tcb Libert y are 
VERMONT 
st AkBAN* u«o. w. Uiomaos u Lower 
tt. Idea st 

WASMIV1TON. 

Sl s t t i |. ,,,| iilrnkiii* I rrinotit 
BF ikAN, ! \ And. il,er»r. 1 ii.inet aee 
WEST VIROINIA. 

'-'i" I'l.Akksi ■ a,, j BV. stcaley. 

IJ* FA I B Mot' NI W. K Hi k Us lienuit 

ave 

It. WMgRUKQ A. L. ISaner, lc.lt* )SCObat. 

WISCONSIN, 

•W rtBKBN IIav 11 Mrist. r ll.*H Chrrrv at 
Ml Ki NoaiiA-H. C t'.oselii.e, 7)'nikCourt 

•--*i Lake Gknbva— Bd Rowland. 

Mi I. iv ii ki i secretary ti f Insinrl CoBBdl 
Chat)'* Heutr, , r ,n| Twrnty fifth tt 
M) (f>r.) John lien man Hh.ii Mis 'den Lane 
71 I Mill wts t \V. "'saiitmnnn.lSJl VHet at 

Hx AtiR. j. Ha Ren. Ml 3f.h st. 

SW, fVOt'TM Mn.iA ai kkk- (Ger.) Ilarty Voa 
Halten. 

wi (Oar.) 

(Her.) H. Meyers, 622 Itnlonat 
■'.SJ (Ger. I Chaa, Kiiiirc 1210 Gairtcld Ave 
m OHitKiisitt-Caaprr Pliior till Grove al. 
id. Racine- M G Kin« 1,17 I'liilllpa ave 

WYOMINU. 
J«7 DtAMONOVttXB— a*, J. McGunn. 



... 



IMI 
Its 



THE CARPENTER. 



MORRILL'S PERFECT SKW SETS. 

Benc h Stops, Car 8ealers. 

Universal Punches. 

Cutting Nippers 
Charles Morrill, 

35 Warren Street, New York. 






ThU Trad* 



(Ri-clitairJ Patent, H*. 30.STS.) 

on aJl Raw l«ti And other Hudwira Specialties of my m»k ». 



I . B. C 4t J. of A -.fries Society 
ESTABLISHED 1-66. 

CHAS. SVENDSEN, 





THE FINZER TOBACCOS 



UNION LABEL QOODS 

(Union Label on each bo*.) 



HAMMACHER 
B CHLEMMEH 
3lCO. 

£00 BOWERY 



Regalia and Badges. 

-• «ei Society Flag, end TlanneM Manufae 
tured Orel '«» DOiletie. fnrni.hed 
with Incite^, or Regalia 

No. ao Hast Court St., Cincinnati. 
First Clans Books, 

CHEAP, PHACTICAL, AND USEPUL 

UottM (ttlfWII » l '***»*" 
rim Ht-iuiB>'« Oris* Km***©* * 

Tub f*TMi. I*wt 4 II *■» Mow t.. i 11 I m 
lii.Tii it U**i-«»t*T. H.«lg«>n 
I*i>ib-Bi it.t.tim M»»" F.*iv llodgaun . l 
It. at* IUluf» Htm ■ 1 w 

Tita r*Br«wT«AB Bfiui>«» «o« „ 
t CuMr.noa" * 

h j. uoovna, 
B»i *m. rvu*t*9*+ N. 



Reed $ ^uerbacher, 

229 BOWERY, 



Dealer,, in 



Fine Tools. 



ONLY ONE DOLLAR DOWN 



Every Union Man should aid THE NATIONAL T03ACCO 
WORKERS UNION by using one or more of the fol- 
lowing brands : 

OLD HOXESTY PLUG 

JOLLY TAR PLUG 

CANTEEN PLUG 

BOOT JACK PLUG 

WILD ROSE SMOKING 

FIVE BROTHERS PIPE SMOKING 

l^-Any dealer wi'l order ANY BRAND you prefer. 




* Hl> ft 01 aaS W* 
»0t IB99 MODEL 

ICUNA BICY* 

i , , i <> li . 

tniin.lloit. Ki 
i 1 1 »i ft\%rm%\ rr«« 

t I i**'-ilt 1 M I 1 . II 

bKAftt i.4».i*> VtCU**< 

IK* , r .1.1- el ? I 



Will. McNieCe ^SOR, A Complete line of 

everything good 
in Carpenters* 
and Joiners' 



515 CHERRY ST., 

PHILADELPHIA, PA, 

MAMUHCTl Rl Hi OF 



mI i' i* 



f ID. M». tli .HO mw»« 

■■>, .»rri atwnawi <■( 

iithrr li M|. Ihi # S 1. ■ ■ 



.nil i ii<ii »• l»*nf* * 

THE yiCWNA 



*i4.e a 



Hand, Panel 
and Rip Jiau/s, 

FROM THE VERY BEST CAST STEEL. 



TOOLS. 



„. »■>.. »tt--* »*<"*• »5J» " , 

1,1.. I, krl ' .J" "' 



UHtll HI * MIM»- 

|M I I l«lM'» rt.n.i- 

i, *■ nt ■-•» )■>< h. t,»il<f 
I mil hall DMrtnp h ■ r..» i, , ....mrl.-i Ha*. 



t-t in mi ii>r>' 



H &luCZ TM A " MUM.* AT »16 <«• "***•'* * ' 



' SEARS, ROEBUCK & CO., CHICAGO, ILL. 



Send for our Tool Catalogue. 

LOUIS ERNST & SONS 

Warranted the Best in the World 129 & 131 East Main St 

ROCHESTER, N. Y. 



ECLIPSE ADJUSTABLE FOLDING SQUARE 



The three illualratlnn. ol the Hcllp.c 
Adjustable FoMtng Square »hown here- 
with, exhibit, the .qnaie open. pertlaily 
cloae.t or M-t forang'ta, and abut, The 
Improvement lnm«ki« K KoMf n ^ Mju.re. 
constat. Id securing the .hort Made by 
I wo cl.npliiD p|*ie. .nd «rew» whereby 
Ihey are h*\' rlf id while beini uitd a. m 
aqua re It alia form. • loekiu« dence 
when the squire !■ fold d. which can 
readily oc aero by th« deprea.ed portion 
of the claniplna platea which *Hde in a 
B ro .»« provided for (he .ante. Wtu n 
cloaed It can be folded and packed In a 
Wl cheat prodded for the aaine ap t 
can be adjuated at tlftbt angle* ready for 
«n at a at «ac when required. It duea away 
with culling hole, in lh top OT aide, of 
II cheat, and la protected from being 
mated when left alamllng or 
to the weather further infor- 
t» obtained from l he 

| LARK 



1^ 



E3i 



WEE 



m 




HAND MADE. 



i 



STANLEY'S ADJUSTABLE 

Beading, Rabbet, Slitting and Matching Plane. 

"A MMlttg Mill v-ithln lUclf,"— «a>a a O.umry Cttrpcntcr. 





Mo. 4«. Nickel Plated Stock and Pence, with Twenty TooU, Bl«, etc., 
SOLD BY ALL HARDWARE DIALERS. 



THE CARPENTER. 




Overalls 




Lane's 



BALL BEARING 

Parlor Door Hanger 



all the valuable features of 
the "LANE STANDARD" *»h 
the best farm of BICYCLE BEAR- 
INGS. Ask yiur dealer for LANE 
HANGERS and send to us for catalogue.' 
We have other goods that will interest you 



LANE BROTHERS COMPANY 

422-54 Prospect Street 

POUGHKEEPSIE, N. V, 





Get your dealer to buy theae nooJa- he'll do It far the aakina and you' 
Muw -or we'll Bend you tap* meaaure, aamplea an<i Mil meaaure 
daiuty gi It edaed Kuaaia leather pocket rjmrnorend mn book free 



ULUIHING. 

11 help the UN ION 
nu nt blank, with a 



i 



C. A. Wayland's Improved Roof Framer's Bevel 




11.00.' If to L* 

Ail lr*--)* (J A. W1TLIVD, Bo* rtTi. Knotvill.-. T«nn.-»«... 



Th'« i'lit -h«,»» the tool In .Mttcrirm poxli'oi > 

while martini nil tit p. ireilay *ml jae* raJler, 

This I- Hi* iiio-t iKtf.il Imi.I for rout fr<- ir >l '>B 
nfr put mi ill* intra*!.. II hs-mll fit ilia treve'a 
lor anv rafter In or e t" >1. H na* ■'Nitnaii'-r. In* 
letter- for tacli h'tnle, I* I' f r plnmts ■ til, T B 
for tup lie t* I anil L ('. fur l*vel cm iji'penLer 
nn'i ivti urine,! alu *ya got the rU lit Irev*! In 
Ihp rtithtr/me It *tve- IiaikII hit more il.in 
one titol. 1 1 "avc > iiLaklni; tii1*takrn wtiVh i.ften 
-H i'ur In rwf fmruing Jt ^ a |re«t i irue a*v*r 
It in *vfll nia-le, 1 ron handle, r Inn! "Heel ti H*t*i. 
I will ^ v* frea Ivltb aacb trol n rl t. T*Mt rMaaram, 
mo trlted on irrott. nreonvenletit *lr*t to carry in 
litp pork*!, and Kiven a *fi*t ar itnl>h Ih* 
diagram a'l of the heed* f <r tuo • run- moat 
rcnnmon % eud , i in ]i ru t%, enabling tha car- 
pfntfr to *i the b'udea the rtt-itrtd b*»*li with- 
oul any mJcula 1 Ion On ih« fit I nr * <f U a 
prtnt*cf r'jl* fnr otit^ilnli'it tu* r,ev.l»f.>r ri.fi*™ 
■ t any pitch. Tryi.neanri r" jon are not »tl>ii«l 
r*turn It niihin W ,lav« and y, ur mi n*.v, ]*n 
imnnporratlon r-herge-. « 111 r>*- refuofletl I'nr* 
■»-t*l by mail rul.l 2n ceota for 



FOXS LOCK MORTISING TOOL. 




Tola la the Tool that aairea one-halt the time in putt In? In Door 
it. Why so ' Because HO.OOO carpenteraaay ao. For aal* by the 
fpt of price, 11 00. Write for circular. 



P. L. FOX it CO. SOLE MANUFACTURERS 

BRIDGEPORT. CONN. 



P. C. ECKHARDT 

General Contractors. Builder 

693 Ninth Avenue 



47th *nd 48th Streets 



TELEPHONE 1030-38 



NEW YORK 




"TRUE AS A DIE." 

WROUGHT STEEL LOCKS 

OROIDE FINISH 

Strong, Durable, Inexpensive 

For le by all Hardware Dealers 

Carpenters will appreciate the fact that the 
measurements of these locks are and Must be 
exact, as true as a die can make them. No 
trouble and vexation in fitting 

Catalogue of Wr 
Seta, on application 

RUSSELL & EJRYVIN M'F'G CO. 

Now York. 



HAMILTON CARHARTT <V COMPANY, DETROIT, MICHIQAN, 

Tho firm thai la ma a ma; UNION MAlU < lothint 




co 



CD 



O 

o 



co o 



00 00 



< 



CO 



o 3 



ANCHOR BRAND 
Adze Eye Nail Hammers. 



LARGEST MANUFACTURERS IN THE WORLD. 

Fayette R. Plumb, FMLa., 



JESSE COX 
Attorney st Law 
HOWARD M. COX 
Mechanical Enojlftssr 

PATENTS 

r>ig f>1l Block Exchange 

Lh Ball* mud Want I niton HIM., Cblcmgo 
in WmmhiBgtoa, D. C. 




We will make you to order a penknit 
like cut above, wiih your picture am 
name thereon, with chamois rase, lor or 
dollar, or s big two-bladed Carpenter 
Knife with German silver cap, bla< 
handle, 75 cents, or tortoise shell hantll< 
one dollar. Blades warranted to slan 
hard wood ct 



• LOCK WOO l» 
15H) Uoplar KL f 




W. S. Thomson 

Manufacturer and Dealer In 

WOOD WORKERS' SUPPLIES 

Pelting, Belting Hooks, Lacing, Band 
and Circular Saws, Piles. Emery Wheels, 
Babbit Metal, Planing Machine Knives, 
Cutters, Etc. 

418 and 420 West 27th M. New Ysrk 

.by] 





THE CARPEi/TSR. 




DORR HIN&ERS 

1 




•STANDARD." 



•'SPECIAL,," DO, 



We are the originators and largest makers of U-shaped hangers. Get 
the GENUINE LANE HANGER for best satisfaction. 

AL80 LANE PARLOR DOOR HANGERS. 

Hoods Sold by all Hardware Dealers. 

H«nd for oar Catalogue or Hardware Sptclullle*. 

LANE 1 BROTHERS COMPANY, 

422-54 PROSPECT 8T. P0U8HKEEP8IE, NEW YORK. 

Norcross Brothers 




i6o Fifth Avenue, New York 
Tremont Building, Boston . . 
Worcester, Mass 



FOX'S LOCK MORTISING TOOL. 




TUi 1. the Tool that umi one-hall the time In patting In Door Lock.. It'i the carve that 
It. Why k> ? Because ttO.000 carpenter, aay to. For tale by the trade, or lent 
at •( price, tl.OO. Write for d 

SOLE MANUFACTURERS 



P. L. FOX & CO. 



BRIDGEPORT. CO/V/V. 



P. C. ECKHARDT 

General Contractor 8( Builder 

693 Ninth Avenue 



47th 



TELEPHONE 1050-38 



NEW YORK 




"TRUE AS A DIE," 

WROUGHT STEEL LOCKS 

OROIDE FINISH 

Strong, Durable, Inexpensive 

For Sale by all Hardware Dealers 

Carpenten will appreciate the fact that the 
measurements of these locks are and Must he 
exact, as true as a die can make them. No 
trouble and vexation in fitting .... 

Catalogue of Wrought Steel Liaoke arid Lock 
Seta, on application 

RUSSELL & ERWIN M'F'G CO. 

Britain, Conn. Ohioa.ro. New York. 



I lit 

PRINCIPLES 
OF 

OROANIZEO 
LABOR 
ANO 
WEAR 
UNION 
MADE 
CLOTHING. 

Oet your deafer to buy ihette Roods -he'll do it for the asking and you'll help the DM IOJJ 4 
mute or we'll send you lepo mnamirn, ™iipk» and *olt juraHuroiuent blank , With • 
dainty gilt edged Russia leather pocket memorandum book free. 

HAMILTON CARHARTT & COMPANY, DETROIT, MICHIGAN, 



The firm that ta 



UNION HADE Clothing popular. 



CO 



O 
O 



o co 



UJ 

GO 



CO 



U 

fee 
< 



S 



o & 



i2 



ANCHOR BRAND 
Adze Eye Nail Hammers. 



Fayette R. Plumb, PMLa. # 



INCOMPORiTli \ 



Adjustable and Folding H'dle D, K. 
MANUFACTURED BY 

A. J. Wilkinson & Co. 

180-188 Washington St. 

BOSTON, MASS. 




We will make you to order a penknife 
like cut shove, with your picture ,nW 
name thereon, with chamois case, for one 
dollar, or a big Iwodiladed (",ap*-ni--r'» 
Knife with German silver cap, bbek 
handle, 75 cents, or tortoise shell handle, 
one dollar. Blades warranted to stud 
hard wood coping. 

K LOCK WOOD 

190 Poplar 8t, Chelsea, Ma* 




W. S. Thomson 

ManufHCUter nod Dealer In 

WOOD WORKERS' SUPPLIES 

Belting, Belting Hooks, Lacing, Band 
and Circular Saws, Files, Emery Wheels, 
Babbit Metal, Planing Machine Knives, 
Cutters, Etc. 



and 420 WMt 27th St. 

All Order, by Mail 



New York 




A Monthly Journal for Carpenters, Stair Builders, Machine Wood Workers, Planing Mill Men, and Kindred Interests 



VOL, XIX.-No. 5. ) 
Established 1881. J 



PHILADELPHIA, JUNE, 1806. 



1 Fifty Cents Per Year. 
\ Single Copies, 5 Cts. 



For Quality and Finish 

"Disston" 



Saws and Files 



WE manufacture our 
own steel and 
are therefore able to 
watch the quality 
loser than any other 
aw maker. 



CANNOT 
No. 12, the Finest Saw Extant 



BE EXCELLED 




Write for our Book- 
let •' Practical Hints 
to Mechanics " on the 
Saw, how to choose 
it and how to keep it 
in order. 



HENRY DISSTON & SONS, Inc.. Philadelphia, P a. 



ALL WOODS BE A HIM; OUR NAME ABE FULLY WARRANTED 



AIIMTOR 
POSITIVE 
SAW SET 

Thousand* of fill tcwl 
m boon »«d, and thoy 



If jour Hard wore Ueml- 
•f doo» not noodle tii-m, 
don't Ul* on Inferior »*t 
hki-ku-s mdu one »•>*. 
" It". J nit »■ good," 

TAINTOR MF8. CO. 

9 to 15 MURRAY ST. 

New YORK. 




FOR SALE BY DEALERS IN BUILDERS HARDWARE 



Reissmann's Rafter and Polygon Gauge 

Made nf 3'ply veneer, size 11" x 13" x \ ", highly polished ami indestructible. 
With this gauge any angle or rut rti|uired in the construction of building and roofs 
ran be obtained instantly and with minute accuracy. Saves time for the skilled 
rcbinic and enables the ordinary workman lo frame roofs with absolute cer- 
tainly, Price 50 cents posWige paid. 

F. RBI88MANN, *V t «t Point, N. Y. 



PIKE'S LILY WASHITA 




- V- 




CARPENTER3 



APRONS 

A SPECIALTY. 




I nii,n, nf isun*, 19 year* in hutinmt. and never had a mtrlkw • tttat't our 
It yuur dmalvr don't keep Kg/iMM good*. Mead to hit nam: 

CLEVELAND & WHITEHILL CO.. Newburgh. N. Y. j 



MOORE'S 

IMPROVED WROUGHT STEEL STORM 
WINDOW FASTENERS 



The Hast Oilstone on Earth 



A fatt-cultln 



it-cutting. t«v 
coarac-grll «o 
•nf gun 

kUu 



ovt n-jrlttcd none. Im|>irti ■ fine edge. Put up i 

d hard medlum-fiae-ttlt. Bach alone Uhetcd, telling whether nutd or itott, 
ran teed to give obaolutc tatlilact lert. The tame atone tnnde tu gouge 
Ipaaod all iipeclat ahapea All leading hardware dealers. 



Send for Catalog of Scythe stonet, Ollalonn. Raw Hones, Kttf* ! 

THE PIKE MFG. CO. PIKE STATION, N. H. 




With these fasteners, storm windows ■ 
t^'adj listed more easily, and held In place 
more securely, than In any other way yet 
Invented. 

NO LADDER REQUIRED. 

Fastened from the inside, the only tool 
necessary being a small hammer. 
Send for Circular*. 

The Stanley Works, a**, m. 

NEW BRITAIN, CONN. 

7t> Chambers St., No Y, 



t 



THE CARPENTER. 



High Grade Machinery STANDARD WOOD WORKING MACHINERY 




CARPENTERS, BUILDERS, 8ASH. 
DOOR, BLIND MAKERS, ETC. < 

Kail mate* •« Single Maihluato aw Equipment* 
Cheerfully formatted. 

Ask far « Weod Worker " Catalogue 



No I. Vaeikty Wood Wcrkkb. 
\ moat valnaMe machine Tor t'arpenterH 
Builders. Suh, Door and Blind Makers, etc., 
a* on It yon c*n perform » variety of work 
which would otherwise require the use of 



J. A. Fay & Co., 




OF EVERY DESCRIPTION. 



of m uythin* In »iir Una 
Ktth yon, ft* we o«i 
on in. . 11 1 y. 



a* t i 
•™bab) f 



5«4*534 W. Front St., 
CINCINNATI, OHIO. 



NO 3. KLAMBB. MATl'HkH AND Mol'MJ'*.. 
Plane*, on« side, 24 iitchft* wide bj- 8 Indie* 
thick. 

M»lehe. II I lichen wide, 
An in valuable machine for •■mull or 
sized *bop. 



312 page catalogue tree If y , 
■are good use for It 



TheEgan Company, 



406-436 W. Front Street, 

*ta CINCINNATI, OHIO 




FOOT 4 HAND POWER MACHINERY 

COMPLETE OUTFITS. 
Carpenter* and Builders without steam power 
can successfully compete with the large shop* 
by using our New Labor Saving rUchlnery. 

Sold ON TRIAL. Btno for Cat*kx.ui A. 

SENECA FALLS MFG. CO 

»a Water St., Seneca Pall., N. V., U. S. A. 




rxtos m kin h ats. 

This I.;il.rl i» 
HDilIt BM InOl ;ltld 

N half aquafe and 
is printed 011 Imfl 
color, il 1 1 1 1 >e 1 It 

I?. ptucrd uti every 

union made hat 
ll*<f Ore it leave* the 

workman')! hand*. 

II n d«Bl«V hiki-i a 
luliel limn one I1.1t 

.mil place* it in 1 11- 
1 iiiti , or ha* any detached la lie], in hi- store, do 
■ol buy front him, aa hi* lalietn m«) be counter, 
it-it. hiii] his huts may be m. prrslitct <.i -v at. or 
noo-u 1 iai.01 




CHt01» MAM CLOTHES. 
ISSUED 



0¥ iUTHORII* tr 




BtCISHSCO 




THE SQUARE ROOT 
DELINEATOR 

0r\ KEY TO THE STEEL SQUARE „ 

BY A. W. WOODS, 

CATS IN PLAIN FiGUffES THE L/NGTMf, 
ffUNS, ffl&ES, PITCH, DESffEES. Ci/TS AND 
BEVELS fOff EVEN AND UNEVEN P/TffNE^ 
HOPPCffJSUTS, EfOA/fD MEASURE ETC., 

ScntVost'paio. Price $1.00 



THE CARPENTE R. p H iuoel^A,Pa| 

l . i ■ — i ' i. - ■*Ta»j*rBTawawaWaMBwawawaF^~ " " 



Thl. Label l»the only poiltlve gui-anter that 
Ready-m.de Clothing, Including overall* and 
jacket*, t* not made under the dreaded, dlseaae- 
lnfe*ted tenement bouse and sweating system. 

Von will find (he linen label attached by ma- 
chine Hitching to the Initde breast pocket of 
the coat, on the inside of the buckle strap of the 
rest, and on the waistband lining of the paut. 



I 



flARTEN DOSCHER 

MANUFACTURER SAUGATUCK, CONN. 

CARPENTERS' BENCH A.ND MOULDING 



Make 'cm. Ton Want 'em 

If you|are a carpenter, 
a contractor, a lumber 
dealer, a real estate 
agent, or if you are 
i*oing to build a house, 
-md 5 cents for Hicks' 
Illustrated Catalogue 
of artistic designs. . , 



What is vc. 
Your Work?\* 



i 



If >m'i are iH***t-*nrd 
\ it i, y ' i 111 i , l , i,, -.r nn 

_ »r>, i • ir i, . ,.. , . i ,, . 

»..»-, hi in Tin Internal -.I' 
<',.rr.-i> .>, l. H ii .-. arranl , |"« ,"" 

I pare utheta m situated j*r* getting 

[An Education by Mail 



tri'-« I 



I. P. Hicks 



PLANES 



HANDLES, 

MALLETS, &c. 



Hand Made. 

> 

*mx roum makdwahm oialiji »o* 

DOSCHERS PLANES 



TOWER & LYON, 



96 Chambers Street, 
NEW YORK. 




:i< 'Station A 

OMAHA. NBH 



BtVi|«*tltfl In thi" i ■■ r-< ■ - I M> ■ 1 i . a r \ % ■ - 
it I Kitjr i m ' ■ ■ r ng t \r- »i i- ■■ ruf. t -r *.< > n| 
th> l 4 .vtl Knj* He- r* ■■ tr t .-ur*i » *r»- 
•it fill lii-l r -r mi l.>n* tMr>. 
iuu r Mm |< ><h n> W nti 
fiiff f n tall i 

rin* l»iiinaiflml 
TflT *i J\ * ***** **W4tijgf (** 



Hi., Illlft* 
k»f F ''<1.i*l, 

I*, 



"1 larftflsui euitl ittKt »t 
vooipjet«lln« of Wood- 

^^f^E^E ALLEN B. RORKE 



oan Wcid Workia* 
Manblat Oo- 



SDtXTBasoaa TO 
r H. Clement Co., (i Ian Cove 
Mrh. Oo., Ltd., Good ell A 
Waters, Hoyi A Bro. Co., 
The Levi Houston Oo , 
Lehman Ucb Co.. nfllvan 
kee Hander Utw Oo., U B 
Rogrr. ' 



Builder sm 

and 

Contractor 



t^ 1 mJ Offices i- 
LOD..Yonn, Bro. PhiladclphiA Bourve, 



PHILADELPHIA 




TOWER'S CHAMPION 

(paalal Stool Titt.d Tough T*mp*r, I Solid Tta;*d 



FINE TOOLS. 

Chaplin's Fat. Planes. 

Corrugated Pice or Smooth Faee. 

Checkered Robber Handle* oi 
Wood Handles. 

LEVER ADJUSTMENT. 
SCREW DRIVERS, 

Hmtt Kail P*ml», Flot*d Hand In. 1 



BsEWAwM OF IIIITiTIO Mm. 




Be snre the trade nark CHAMPION U oa eaeh blade. 



Sworn Circulation of THE CARPENTER 

19,000 COPIES MONTHLY 

Best Advertising Medium for Too! Manufacturers, Wood 
Working Machinery, Hardware, Lumber and Building 
Materials. Also of Special Advantage to Contractors, 
Architects and Business Men. 




Satisfaction 

is given all around when the house is 
trimmed with Sargent's Hardwa e. The 
Architect is pleased because he speci- 
fied it ; the owner Is pleased each time 
he looks at the trimmings because they 
add so much to the beauty of the home, 
and everybody is pleased with the work- 
ing of Sargent's Easy Spring Locks. 

Sargent & Company, 

Maker* of Artistic Hardware and Fine 
New Vurk; ami New Haven, Conn. 




A Monthly Journal for Carpenters, Stair Builders, Machine Wood Workers, Planing Mill Men, and Kindred Interests. 



VOL. XIX.-No. 5. 
Established I88t. 



} 



PHILADELPHIA, JUNE, 1809. 



{ 



Fifty Cents per Year. 
Single Copies, 5 Cts. 



Sre jjlori'iii* summer atnnd 

In all tier loveliness. 
Wild rtowifN in her ttft&d 

Hmliroi'lrrrd on her dress: 
Her radiant forehead crowned 

With wieath of row* sweet. 
And yellow king-cups bedding round 

Her soft, ^ram. inn. lulled feet ' 

>>ee, a> she turns her face 

The smile upon her lips ; 
*ee with ivbut gentle grace 

Hesideathe stream she trips. 
Lets fait from her full hand 

Wild flowers here and there. 
To mnk<- an un frequented land 

With her own l)-auly fait 1 
What -iojiRs are sung to her 

Toinal«e her heart rejoice 
Warm praise o I worshipper 

In linntt's tender voice' 
She has i-ome forth to -re 

Our earth at woointi-tlde. 
A int lil n-hr- now to find that sfc» 

Is greeted as the hride. 

ISAAi II (s-.i:ri Ciioatp. 



Certainly a Good Showing, 

In the past three months we char- 
tered i6 new unions, and since Feb- 
ruary ist gained f>,.\H$ members in 
good standing. On February ist last 
we had 30,660 beneficial members and 
on June ist the membership increased 
to 37- 1 15 beneficial members. In 
April our gain was 2/16$ members, 
and in May 3.205 The prospects are 
still better for a larger increase this 
month. 



Successful Trade flovementt Among 
Carpenters This Seaaou, 



On April ist, Union 1N2, Uma, O., 
established the nine-hour day. Union 
31. Trenton, N J , secured the eight- 
hour day Saturdays, with nine hours 
per day the other five days of the 
we*k, making fifty- three hours per 
week. Union 1S5, Cleburne, Tex., got 
the nine-hour day and Union 251), 
Jackson, Tenn., made an advance of 
five cents per hour, and inaugurated 
the nine hour rule, 

Union 716, Zanesville, 0„ on April 
ist, established an excellent code of 
trade rules and the nine hour day in 
the planing mills of that city, as it 
had been the rule on outside carpenter 
work several years. 

In E. St. Louis, III., Union 169 de 
clared a strike, April ist, for the eight- 
hour day and enforcement of trade 
rules and won in less than two days. 

BouMer, Colo., carpenters instituted 
the eight hour day without opposition. 
Union 55, Denver, Colo., secured a 
standard rate of 53 per day and eight - 
hours, May ist, and had no trouble to 
get it by the rough organization. 

On May ist, by decisive stands 
made by pur carpenters' unions in 



Pittsburg, Pa. ; Springfield, Mass ; 
Brooklyn, N. Y. ; Cleveland, O., Chi- 
cago, Springfield, 111. ; Muncie, Ind. ; 
I'assaic, N, J. ; Torrington, Conn. ; 
Perth Amboy, N. J., and Feck vi lie, 
Pa., wages have been advanced and 
union trade rules enforced for the pro- 
tection of the craft. 

Marion, Ind., carpenters went out 
May 1 6th and were four weeks on 
strike, to establish trade rules and 
nine hours a day, and finally were vic- 
torious. 

Union carpenters in Belleville, 111.; 
Klizabeth, N. J.; Jersey City, N. J.; 
Iloboken, N. J ; Bayonne, N. J., and 
New Rochelle, N. Y., were successful 
in winning the eight-hour day last 
month with very little trouble, and 
all through the power of unionism. 

OnJuneis* 1'nion 189, 'Jutncy, 111., 
ordered a strike to establish trade 
rules and the contractors capitulated 
the third day. 

Strikes of Carpenters Now In 



Success of the Eight-hour Movement. 



The members of Carpenters Union 
7K, Troy, N. Y., have been out on 
strike since April ist for a restoration 
of the old scale of wages and the ob- 
servance of trade rules. For over ten 
weeks the ranks have remained un- 
broken. All the building trades are 
out together in this fight. 

MEMPHIS, Tenn,— Members of the 
U, B. are on strike against the Cole 
Manufacturing Company. 

Oi R members are on strike in 
Scran ton, Pa., and Winnipeg, Mani- 
toba, In Scran ton the fight is for the 
eight- hour day and trade rules, and 
the men have been out since June ist. 
In Winnipeg the men are on strike 
since May ist for the nine-hour day 
and a Btandard of 30 cents per hour. 

The Carpenters Unions of Wilkes- 
barre, Pa , established the nine-hour 
day, May ist, without any difficulty, 
but now the Builders Kxchange 
refuses to concede the minimum wage 
asked for by the unions and a strike 
is imminent this month. 

Schenectady, N. Y,— All the 
members of Union 146 were locked 
out on 1 ;th inst, and the contractors 
demand severance of our connection 
with the Building Trades Council of 
this city. We declined to withdraw 
from the Council and propose to fight 
it out. 

Peekskill, N. Y.— Members of 
Union 163 are on strike against Hop- 
kins & Co., and a few other firms, 
which refuse to comply with union 
terms. 



The eight hour law went into effect 
in British Columbia on the 1 2th inst. 



The Filipino and American Peace 
Commissioners hold eight-hoar ses- 
sions. 

The Union Painters of Denver, 
Colorado, have won their demand, 
S2..K.J, and the eight- hour day. 



The New Haven Railroad has issued 
an order making eight hours a full 
working day for its employees. 



Union No. 714 of Flushing, N. V., 
has succeeded in securing the eight- 
hour day and $3 00 scale of wages. 



At New Rochelle, N. Y., Local 
Union No. 42, has been successful 
since May 1st, in securing the eight- 
hour day. 

A dispatch from Centerville, Iowa, 
states that the miners' and operators' 
joint conference has agreed to an eight- 
hour day. 

Thr bricklayersof Syracuse, N. Y., 
have been conceded forty five cents 
an hour instead of forty, and the 
eight-hour day. 



The eight-hour day has been adop- 
t<d by the City Council of Memphis, 
Tenn., for all laborers and mechanics 
working for the municipality. 



The carpenters' strike in Cleveland, 
O., is ended. The men have been 
conceded twenty-seven and one- half 
cents an hour with an eight-hour day. 



The International Miners' Congress, 
which is sitting at Brussels, has voted 
by an immense majority in favor of 
the enforcement of a legal eight- hour 
day. 

Practically all the Des Moines, 
Iowa, mines have conceded the de- 
mands of the miners for an eight-hour 
day, anu the continuatlo a of the winter 
scale all the year round. 



The demands of the Jersey City 
bricklayers and masons for an eight- 
hour day and compensation at the 
rate of forty five cents an hour, have 
been conceded by the employers. 



A strong local of the Brotherhood 
was installed in Hershberger's Hall, 
Pittsburg, Pa., last week. The charter 
will be kept open until July ist, when 
it is expected to have a membership 
of fully 200. 

J* 

The sewer laborers and contractors 
of Detroit, Mich., have compromised 
their differences on the basis of eight 
hours instead of ten, $1.30 for men 
above ground, $1.50 for men below 
and $2 80 for bricklayers. 



The eight-hour situation at Ward, 
Colo , has been settled. Three dol- 
lars per day will be paid by the big 
mines for eight hours' work. The 
Boulder County mines are all busy 
and promise a good output 



Union No. 167 of Elizabeth. 
N, J., have gained the eight-hour 
day and everything is moving along 
smoothly. The membership is rap- 
idly increasing. The plumbers and 
tinners have been organized. 



In New Yo»k State, Factory In- 
spector John Williams has made a 
decision to the e fleet that the em- 
ployees of the Street Cleaning De- 
partment come under the provisions of 
the eight hour law. P. J. McNulty, 
the walking delegate of the Hostlers 
and Drivers Union, which takes in the 
street cleaners, has been instructed by 
the union to ask the Mayor to see 
that the provisions of the law are 
strictly enforced. 



The Mason Builders' Association 
has conceded the demands of the 
Laborers' Union of New York and 
Brooklyn for thirty-three cents an 
hour (an it. crease of three cents), the 
eight-hour work day and the Satur- 
day half holiday. An agreement for 
a year embodying these terms has 
been signed. The agreement also 
provides that the laborers are to re- 
ceive double wages when they work 
overtime, and at the rate of time and 
half when they work on holidays. 

{Continued on page i ) 



2 



THE CARPENTER. 



A Question of Economics. 



BY SAM. L. MtFMNGWKM« 




OMKTHING ol an object 
lesson came under my ob- 
servation, a few mornings 
ago as illustrating an uttei 
ignorance if not total in- 
difference as to the use and applica- 
tion of a vote in the exercise of 
sovereignty in the franchise. One of 
ruy neighbors is a carpenter. He 
does not belong to the union as he 
considers himself a sort of contractor 
—that is, he takes plans already pre- 
pared, the copying, dimensions, 
lumber, etc., and puts the material 
together till it assumes the altitude 
and conditions of a house or dwelling 
place. Upon inquiry he complained 
that business during the winter had 
been only fair— nothing to brag of, 
" But," I suggested, "the premises are 
bright for a lively season in the 
building line, from the number of 
permits announced in the dailies- 
even more so than at this period last 
year." 

" It may appear so " said he, "but 
the fact is lumber is too high, and is 
still going up in price. Now it has 
gone up about two dollars a thousand 
in the last month. Why the fact is it 
is affecting men of large means and 
men of smad means, and working 
people who might have any notion of 
venturing into projects to build them- 
selves homes are utterly discouraged. 
They fear to tackle the increased 
expense." 

"Did you ever give any thought, " 
said I, "to the cause or reason for 
this advance in the price of lumber ?" 

"No," said he, "unless it Is that 
several of the larger lumber companies 
have joined together to raise the 
price. " 

"What enables them to do this, 
John ? "said L 

" I don't know, unless it is because 
they have all the money on their 
side ; can afford to buy largely and let 
the lumber lie in their yards if no one 
wants to buy at their prices." 

"John," said I, "don't you know 
that there is a government tax upon 
every inch of lumber that is brought 
into the country from foreign fields ? 
Don 't yon know that all the lumber 
thus brought in— imported— has to 
pay a tax of one dollar or two dollars 
—it has been as high as two dollars— 
upon every thousand feet before it 
can be considered as entered ? " 

"But that is to protect our own 
lumber, the lumber produced in this 
country," said John. 

"Yes, I know that is the theory, 
John; but how does it protect it? 
Who gets the benefit of the protec- 
tion ? " 

"Why, I suppose the producers of 
lumber in this country who are thus 
protected against foreign competi- 
tion." 

« Is that all, John ? Does the gov- 
em merit, which imposes this tax, 
receive no benefit ? " 

' • I nuppose the government gets 
the benefit of what tax is paid on the 
lumber brought in as revenue." 

"But how are the producers of lum- 
ber In our own country benefited ? " 

Why, by keeping out the foreign 
lumber, of course." 



" Then you believe that without 
the government tax there could he 
more lumber brought into the couutiy 
and lumber would be cheaper ? " 

•■Well, yes, that would be the 
case." 

" Then our own product would cost 
no more than the price of foreign 
lumber ? " 

"Well, it looks that way.'' 

"Don't you know, John, that the 
absence of foreign Inn bet i.s not the 
only advantage to be reaped by the 
home producer, in the imposition of 
two dollars per thousand tax on the 
foreign product.' Don't you know 
that upon every thousand feet of 
lumber produced and put upon the 
market in our country, the two dol- 
lars -or whatever the tax upon the 
foreign product may he - is added 
to the home producing price of 
the lumber before it reaches the buyer 
or consumer ? " 

" I suppose that is so." 

"Well, does not that make the 
lumber dearer to the bujer of lumber 
the consumer— the house builder— 
the man who wants the house built; 
the man who wants lumber for any 
purpose? Doesn't the higher price 
of lumber deter a larger number of 
people from investing in building im- 
provements? Doesn't it prevent, 
in a large measure, the man of mod- 
erate means from venturing in the en- 
terprise of a new homestead ? Does 
it not dtcimate the uses to which 
lumber can be applied, cripple the 
efforts of the artisan and mechanic, 
lessen the demand for labor in all 
branches of the building trade and 
cause hundreds to remain idle and in- 
active who might otherwise be en: 
ployed in useful avocations providing 
for themselves and dependents and 
bringing happiness and contentment 
to thousands otherwise desolate and 
despondent ? " 

" I never looked at it in that way. " 

"Well, you want to look at It in 
Its true light. You want to investi- 
gate it and give it serious, unbiased 
thought. You want to remember also 
that there is no power Wider the Con- 
stitution by which Congress can pass 
any kind of a law that takes the money 
out of the pockets of one class of 
people and puts it into the pockets of 
another class. Congress has power 
only to levy taxes and excises as" a rev- 
enue to meet the expenses of an econ- 
omic government. That may look 
like talking politics, John, but there 
is nothing partisan In it. I want to 
impress upon your mind that the man 
who follows blindly the line of party 
politics, and In the exercise of sover- 
eignty casts his vote in such manner 
as to increase the burdens which 
weigh upon himself and others of his 
class, is little fitted to express judg- 
ment upon the betterment of condi- 
tions. Politics, John, is the science 
of government, in its best Bense, but 
when manipulated by bad, designing 
men, inspired by methods of cor nipt 
purposes, it becomes the tool of polit- 
ical tricksters, and the hontst, well- 
Intendiug masses are most generally 
the victims of deception and fraud, in 
class legislation, benefiting only the 
very few, already well-to do, at the 
expense of the many, contending and 
struggling for the right to maintain 
what, st best, is a mere existence." 



"Well," said John, "1 never was 
much of a politician ; I never gave it 
much thought ; I seldom go the polls ; 
I sometimes go when there is hot 
contest here in the city, but I don't 
go much on party. They 're all alike to 
rue— one is about as bad as the other. 

" That's all right. John, horn your 
standpoint," said I, »• but without 
questioning your party affiliation, 
would it not be some satisfaction to 
you to know that, after weighing the 
results in your mind you had cast 
your vote in such manner as would 
bring about an improvement of your 
condition and better enable you to 
provide for the necessities of your 
large and growing family of depen- 
dents, than to find that you had 
assisted in bringing about a state of 
affairs which daily and hourly Grip- 
ped your responsibilities, brought 
additional burdens upon your advanc- 
ing years and caused you to conclude 
that life was not worth the living." 

John assumed a somewhat reflective 
mien, and, with the compliments of 
a bright Sunday morning, we parted. 

Now, this does not only apply to 
John, the carpenter, but its application 
is just as strong In other directions, 
it has peculiar significance as apply- 
ing to any and every class of working- 
men, and to trade unionists it should 
be a serious matter of thought. It is 
not necessary, nor Is it proper to in- 
troduce the discussion ol partisan 
politics into the business of a trade 
union ; that would be foreign to the 
purposes and designs of the organiza- 
tion. But ther..- is certainly nothing 
in trades unionism that forbids or 
prevents a man from entertaining be- 
lief or opinion on any subject worthy 
of thought- religious, political or 
otherwise; and as the question of 
economics is one in which he is im- 
mediately-vitally—interested, the 
quantity of dollars and cents which he 
may count up to his profit or loss be- 
comes one of most essential consider- 
ation. We know it is a serious adven- 
ture to tramp on the toes of a strictly 
party adherent; hut, to express an 
individual belief, the man who would 
coolly, calmly, almost maliciously, 
cast a vote to increase, by tax of any 
kind, a drain upon his resourcts, 
without remunerative i no ease in his 
income, should be considered as one 
incapableof reg' ' linghis own affairs. 
To conclude with a passing thought, 
the man who votes for the adoption 
of measures that will increasethe cost 
of his necessities to $ioq a year over 
what it was the year previous, and 
plods the year through without in- 
crease in his earnings over that of the 
previous year, is forced to a reduction 
of about $2 a week in his wages. 

That is plain enough, and sensible 
and reflective met may give it what 
consideration they please. 



New Labor Saving Device. 



Information Wanted 



Concerning the whereabouts of 
Frank K. Thompson, of 370 West 1 27th 
street, New York city, who disap- 
peared from his home on April 1st, 
He was a member of lx>cal Union 
509. Please communicate with Wil- 
liam Nicholson, 482 Brook avenue, 
New York, or with P. J. McGuire, 
Box m, Philsdelphia, Pa. 



A report from London says that the 
latest device in the way of labor -Sav- 
ing machinery is described as a 
"mechanical bricklayer " for use i n 
"automatically laying, cementing 
and leveling bricks, slabs and stouts 
in the construction of fortifications, 
piers, bridges, viaducts, warehouses, 
dwelling houses ami buildings uf 
every description." 

Such an Apparatus has bees 
patented in Great Britain and abroad 
by 1 Birmingham consulting engiti. t r 
and his son, who say that it will save 
two thirds of the time occupied m 
laying bricks by hand. 

Spinning Metal. 



James H. Bevington. a Cleveland, 
Ohio, inventor of note, has completed 
tt device for spinning metal which 
promises to work important changes 
in various lines of metal iiianul iclur- 
Ing. The principle upon which the 
discovery is based is extremely sim- 
ple. The metal that is spun is in 
tul uilar form, and is placed in a lathe, 
which turns at the rate of [,800 revo- 
lutions a minute lu a moment's 
time the metal becomes hot and soil 
ens from the friction and can then In- 
shaped by the operator, according to 
his wishes. The tool, which cunsisis 
of hard steel jaws, touching on eithei 
side of the revolving tube, can be 
readily engaged to any desired width 
and the softened metal may be spun 
down by means of pressure to any 
Size or shape, so long as a ciicular 
form is retained. 



Filipino Aclors Admitted. 



Mr. i'owderly, the Cum miss ion er- 
General of Immigration, with the ap- 
proval of the Secretary of the Treas- 
ury, has issued iiistriirliutis to tin 
ollicials of his service at San Fran- 
cisco to land the company of Filipino 
actors who have been detained there 
some weeks pending a final determin- 
ation of the case. 

In the course of his letter Air. I'ow- 
derly says that the person*, who have 
a contract with the Filipinos, and 
who were instrumental in bringing 
them to this country, assert that it 
was their intention "to procure the 
services of natives of the Philippine 
islands who w lid be fair types of the 
people of that race. That in addition 
they should be competent to illustrate 
the domestic life, habits and customs 
of their countrymen, and that they 
should be actors of such recogni/.« d 
ability as to enable them to faithfully 
portray, as ac'ors, the scenes and 
incidents of life In the Philippines " 

Continuing, Mi. Powderly says: 
"The testimony given in this case 
goes to show that the appellants are 
actors, and that their performance was 
witnessed by omi who testified to that 
fact. It is true that they follow other 
occupations, but that is also true or 
many well known actors In the United 
States. The point raised as to their 
-compensation is not material, since 
there is no recognized rule or standard 
by which managers of theatres are 
governed In paying the salaries Ol 



»» 



THE CARPENTER. 



3 



Cuba's Undeveloped Resources. 



E§r^j|~S U BANS are learning Amerl 

m Wj$u tan wa >' s ver y quickly 

n V5a*W says the correspondent of 
the Philadelphia Press. 

1 Although wages have 

been generally increased, and in no 
case has there been a decrease, yet a 
number of strikes have taken place 
■ince January tst, including one by 
the railroad employees. Under Span- 
ish rule there never was, so far as can 
be learned, niore than one important 
Strike on the island. The way the 
Spanish ended that strike discouraged 
further efforts by workmen in that 
direction. 

It was a strike of longshoreme?- .it 
Cicnfuegos in t%l. The strikers 
were arrested and deported as crimi- 
aals, And yet some of those same 
men, who returned to Cienfuegos, 
After having received under American 
rule an increase of 50 cent* a day in 
their wages, struck for more in April 
last, and put the government officials 
to considerable trouble. There is a 
little too much of that kind of " grati- 
tude " shown on the part of a cer- 
tain class of Cubans to make it 
pleasant. 

With more freedom the workmen, 
who already have organizations of 
their own, will no doubt become a 
power. This will be particularly true 
of the cigar makers in Havana. There 
are many thousands engaged in that 
trade, as there are 125 large cigar 
manufactories in the city and a very 
large number of small ones. These 
workmen have already shown their 
power in refusing to dispense with 
readers. It is the custom for the fac- 
tories to employ persons to read aloud 
to the men while at work. The num- 
ber of readers must be great enough 
■o that the workmen can all be within 
hearing distance of a reader. 

The selections are of a varied char- 
acter, but principally romances. This 
entails a considerable expense on em- 
ployers, but all attempts to break up 
the practice have caused so much 
trouble that readers are still em- 
ployed. 

There are many odd things to 
American eyes in Cuba. For one 
thing there are no chimneys on the 
houses. There is little need of ever 
heating the houses, and no provision 
Is made for that purpose. The cook- 
ing is done with charcoal, hence there 
is no need of chimneys for any pur- 
pose. The exception is in the case of 
factories and large establishments 
using steam power. 

When a Cuban motions to a person 
to draw nearer he opens the palms of 
bis hands and makes a movement 
exactly the opposite from that used in 
the United States— In other words, an 
American, unless aware of this pecu- 
liarity, thinks the Cuban is beckon- 
ing to go away from him. When try- 
ing to arrest the attention of a person 
the Cuban utters a hiss. The Ameri- 
can is liable to mistake this for an 
insult. 

■ While sea bathing ought to be pop- 
ular here it 1b done under difficulties. 
The harbor water is so dirty that only 
urchins bathe In it. At Playa de 
Mariano, a suburb on the ocean front, 
the water is so clear that the bottom 
can be seen at a depth of twenty feet. 
But i» Havana harbor the bottom 



cannot be seen at a greater depth than 
two feet. The presence of sharks 
makes bathers cautious. 

But the coral rock bottom is a still 
greater objection. At several points 
the coral bottom has been hollowed 
out and fenced in, so as to make 
bathing safe A charge is made for 
bathing at such places. 

The clearness of the water about the 
island 1b remarkable. Around Bata- 
bano, the port south of Havana, where 
sponge " fishing " is carried on wholly 
by naked divers, the water is exceed- 
ingly clear. Ooing eastward on the 
Menendez line of steamers for Sant- 
iago for a distance of too miles the 
white coral bottom of the sea can be 
distinctly seen. The fishes and marine 
plants, including occasional sharks 
and other large fish, make the voyage 
a peculiarly interesting one. This 
shoal water, however, does not pre- 
vail for only a part of the distance to 
Santiago. 

The numerous species of fish, over 
600, found in the waters of the Island, 
make that along the coast a very gen- 
eral article of food. Crustaceans, such 
as lobsters, .shrimps and crabs, are 
numerous. Oysters can be found in 
great quantities on the mangrove 
bushes and other vegetation growing 
along the water's edge, but while 
numerous they are too small to be 
used much in any way excepting raw. 
Two dozen of them are generally 
served at one time. The repulsive- 
looking land crabs nre used by the 
natives for food. They are numerous 
along the eastern coast, and cross ir 
armies of millions from one shore to 
the other. They grow to over eight 
inches in diameter, and are very pug- 
nacious. The marching of this army 
of crabs is arcompanied with a very 
disagreeable noise. They will climb 
vertical walls and dig tunnels and 
thus oveicome obstructions. 

Excepting on high ground, swept 
by the trade winds, Cuba, In the 
matter of mosquitoes, is worse than 
New Jersey. Flies are another similar 
nuisance Ants, "jiggers," scor- 
pions, lizards, centipedes, tarantulas 
and other such animals are plentiful, 
but the bites of the poisonous ones 
are rarely fatal. 

The same thing is true of snakes, of 
which, however, there are few varie- 
ties on the island. There are no 
rat*'< snakes, copperheads ~.nd other 
sm common in the United States. 
The largest snake found in Cuba is 
the " waja." It is not poisonous and 
never attacks human beings, though 
it sometimes grows to a length of 
eighteen feet and a diameter of eight 
inches. This snake lives near houses 
or barns, and is fond of poultry. 
Game is plentiful, such as rabbits, 
deer, wild boar, wild fowl, which 
come from the north in the winter 
season, wild turkey and guineas, and 
numerous birds, some of which are 
not found in the United States. 

Humboldt long ago remarked on 
the strange fact that in Cuba can be 
found, almost side by aide, the vege- 
tation of both colder and warmer 
countries. On the Isle of Pines, 
mahogany and pine trees grow near 
together. The pine tree Is also found 
on the mainland. The 16,000,000 
acres or more of untouched forests 
may even contain timber not known 
to be on the island, as there are vast 



*racts of forest land which have never 
been explored. 

There are thirty-five kinds of palm 
trees, all of which have some specific 
value. Ebony, Iignumvitae, Cuban 
cedar, mahogany, logwood and other 
dye woods, and numerous other woods 
are exported to some extent But the 
lack of roadsand transpo'tation facili- 
ties retards the growth of that Indus- 
try. Where there are good transpor- 
tation facilities, which are rare, wood- 
land will bring high prices. But 
simitar land will sell for one-hundredth 
part as much when situated even a 
comparatively short distance away 
from the transportation routes. 

In the Isle of Pines, which perma- 
nently belongs to the United States, 
there will be opportunity for Ameri- 
cans to try both the lumber business 
and the cultivation of the ground. 
That island is about sixty miles long 
and twenty-five miles wide. It has 
less than 2,000 of population. It has 
a large growth of pine, as well as of 
cedar and other woods. 

A number of Americans have been 
to the island to look over the ground 
with a view to fruit culture. Catch- 
ing turtles is one of the island's in- 
dustries. It is really two islands 
connected by rocky ledges through a 
swamp There are said to be valuable 
minerals on it, but there has been no 
satisfactory investigation of its capa- 
bilities, and it lacks a good harbor, 
whiie the water is too shoal for large 
vessels to enter any of the ports. 

Intoxicated bees are one of the 
curious things to be seen in Cuba. 
Rum is a by-product of sugar- mak- 
ing, and the bees often desert the 
sugar to sip the rum. The result is 
amusing. Cuba Is a great place lor 
the bees. Flowers bloom all the year, 
while the sugar mills are attractions. 
The bees do not go into winter quar- 
ters, as they do in the United States, 
but can work every day in the year. 
Still there has been no attempt at 
systematic apiculture. The exports 
of wild honey and beeswax amount to 
nearly $75,000 worth in normal times. 
If systematically conducted, the pro- 
duction of honey should prove a very 
profitable industry. 

The field for development In Cuba 
seems unlimited. There are particu- 
larly no banking facilities outside of 
two or three cities, and they are very 
limited in those cities. There la not 
a regular savinga bank on the island. 
Until the United States government 
established the postal money order 
business here there were no facilities 
for sending small sums of money to 
Interior towns, excepting the risky 
one of putting the money in a letter. 

Banking as known and understood 
in the United States is unknown in 
Cuba, excepting in Havana. There 
are note shavers and money lenders, 
who, having no banks to compete 
with, have been in the habit of driv- 
ing hard bargains. A banking system 
is one of the great needs of the island. 
As the British Foreign Office says 
that there is $50,000,000 of British 
and French capital invested in Cuba, 
there is hope expressed here by Cu- 
bans for further aid in capital from 
those nations. But capital will not 
be invested in Cuba to any extent 
until the island has a permanent gov- 
ernment that will be satisfactory to 
capitalists 1 ^licxc will noX^ in tills 



generation, be any such satisfactory 
government In Cuba unless it is that 
of the United States. 



Is Civilization Really Worth While? 



Why civilize the Filipinos ? Is it 
a good thing that the Japanese and 
Chinese, under the touch of Western 
life, are awakening to "beco-ueas one 
of us ? " Is civilization worth while ? 
Does it not mean the jostling of these 
primitive folk out from their placid 
order into the turmoil of our con- 
tentious state ? These are questions 
now being asked, loudly by the pes- 
simist, timidly by the optimist. A 
gentleman late returned from Japan 
said : " It seems a pity to disturb the 
Arcadian simplicity of those gentle 
people by bringing them into our 
fevered social and commercial condi- 
tions." 

It has always been our way, in 
certain moods, to contemplate with 
envy the content of ignorance. We 
sometimes covet the peace of the day 
laborer, as he leans back against the 
wall to snooze in the ^un after his 
morning toil and his midday lunch ; 
he has no cai king worry such as ours ; 
he is called from labor to refreshment, 
and his " little life is rounded with a 
sleep." We at times count the awine 
fortunate in his sty when our 
harassments overwhelm us. But this 
is all a mistake 

Swine, bumpkin and child are not 
happier than we, with our troubles of 
conscience and of duty. They are not 
so happy as we because they are not 
so unhappy. The capacity for joy is 
measured by the capacity for sorrow. 
Life Is no higher than it is deep. The 
child's laughter is as superficial as 
his tears. So when the Christ said 
He came to \vs that our "joy might 
be full," we think it is a strange 
statement, observing Him to be "a 
man of sorrows and acquainted with 
grief, " until we come to understand 
that it was only by showing the 
vrorld how to suffer divinely, how to 
take the burden of all men's wretch- 
edness within our heart, that we 
could be taught how to be glad 
divinely, how to know "the peace of 
God which passeth all understanding." 

Japanese, Filipinos, Chinese, all 
heathen peoples, wul find the program 
of Christian civilization to be no 
primrose path of dalliance. They will 
enter at once into no ideal social and 
governmental form, any more than 
have we ourselves. Bat the call of 
destiny has come to them in this 
nineteenth century, and, will they or 
nil they, there Is for them only to 
take up their cross and go, through 
much struggling, to " the joy that is 
set before them." The larger life ot 
to-morrow can be born only by the 
travail of to-day. 

Salvation — civilization : both mean 
the rising of man from the lower to 
the higher life. Salvation is the 
Father's uplift; civilization is the 
upward push of mutual effort. The 
Father's aid cornea down by the cross : 
the brother's aid comes up by the way 
of the cross. Salvation — civilization : 
there Is neither without Calvary. 

Frank Cranb, 



4 



Trade Notes. 

Si ringi iki.p, III. — I Cvery union 
carpenter In this city la at work, and 
several large jobs have been union- 
ized during the past few weeks. 

New York City— Brother Thomas 
McOueen has been elected president 
of Local L'nion 509, to succeed Brother 
Alexander Nichol, who has gone to 
Mexico. 

Carpentkrs I nion No. 32, of Brook- 
lyn Borough, N V., has reimbursed 
four members for the loss of their 
tools in the fire in Hierschenk's shops 

New Castle, Pa.— The union is in 
an exceedingly healthy condition. 
Within a short period we initiated 
fifty- six new members and refnstaled 
quite a large number. 

Leavenworth, Kan —Local Union 
499 has succeeded in obtaining the 
eight-hour working day for its mem- 
bers, and this will certainly have the 
effect of largely increasing their 
number. 

** 

Kansas City, Kans.— Brother W. 
F.Jones has been elected Recording 
Secretary of Local Union 138, vice- 
Brother H. K Clark resigned Brother 
IC. D Cole has been elected Vice- 
President to succeed Brother O. B. 
Fuller. 

J* 

Holvoke, Mass.— Local Union 105 
held a grand mass meeting during the 
last week in May and another big 
demonstration at the beginning of the 
present month. They have a flour- 
ishing Union and the members are 
greatly encouraged. 

Louisville, Ky.— The carpenters 
and joiners of Louisville, Ky., have 
adopted a set of resolutions for pre- 
sentation to the Typographical Union 
of that city for the interest it took in 
having none but union carpenters 
employed on the Courier Journal 
building. 

Jersey City, N. J.— The bosses 
have conceded the eight hour work- 
ing day with an increase in wages. 
There are not many idle mechanics in 
this city at present. Hoboken has 
also been added to the list of eight- 
hour cities, and soon other points In 
New Jersey will be in Una. 

San Francisco, Cal.— The work 
of organization both here and in Oak- 
land is making considerable headway, 
and the unions are rapidly Increasing 
in membership. The reports from all 
sections of the coast are gratifying 
and encouraging, and indicate a 
general interest in the movement. 

Memphis. Tenn. The men em- 
ployed by the Cole Manufacturing 
Company, general wood workers, have 
been on strike for several weeks. The 
District Council did all it could to 
avert such action, but owing to the 
general dissatisfaction among the men 
because of frequent reduction of wages, 
and the unwillingness of the firm to 
listen to reason, a strike was ordered. 
The men are confident of success. 



Patkrson, N.J. — Work Is plenti- 
ful here and wages are from 22 to 
28 cents an hour, as against 20 and 
25 cents the prices paid during the 
past two years. Within twelve months 
ninety new members have been 
initiated in Local Union 325, and 
there Is a forward movement for the 
union scale of wages and better con- 
ditions. 

BOTTO, Mont —The union has won 
a big victory here. The Anaconda 
Company put up one of their scab 
carpenters for alderman in the fifth 
w rd which is composed of a very 
undesirable class of citizens. The 
union had a committee at work night 
and day for two weeks, and on elec- 
tion day the unsavory candidate was 
completely snowed under. 

J* 

City or Mrkko — Many improve- 
ments are in progress in Tampico. 
One of the most important is the 
erection of a large custom house. 
American bricklayers are in great 
demand there, the rate of wages for a 
first-class man being jSon per day. 
The government will begin the con- 
struction of new wharves there as 
soon as the custom house is completed. 
These will probably be constructed of 
stone. 

•3* 

Soi th Omaha, Xeb— Trade rules, 
eight hours and 30 cents per hour 
have' been adopted here and the con- 
tractors are willing to concede the 
demands, provided the men go easy 
with them on jobs now in course of 
erection. No trouble is anticipated. 
This will soon be one of the best union 
towns in the West Work is plentiful 
and there is a demand for first class 
carpenters. The work of organization 
is being pushed ahead. 

J* 

An active building season has set 
in. The Increase in New York for 
March over March of last year was 75 
per cent ; Brooklyn, 29 per cent. In 
Chicago general neglect to build fire 
escapes Is complained of, and over a 
thousand notices have been sent to 
owners. At Cleveland 3000 carpen- 
ters were granted the eight hour day 
and rj% cents an hour. Denver is to 
have a $400,000 auditoiium. A build- 
ing boom is on in Hartford, Conn. 

Minneapolis, Minn —The union 
is getting the scale and hours 
demanded. Only seven scab firms in 
the city, and these are classed as 
small contractors. The Building 
Trades Council has sixteen different 
trades affiliated with it and a B. T. C. 
working card has been adopted. This 
has resulted in putting all of the 
building trades, including the car- 
penters, squarely on their feet. The 
wood workers of the city num'jer 
nearly 600 and as they are also 
affiliated with the B T. C. they are 
allowed to work side by side with 
carpenters. All cabinetmakers and 
stairbullders belong to the wood 
workers. 

Peekskill, N. Y. The members 
of Onion 163 are making a determined 
stand against the firm of Hopkins & 
Co. The men are well organized, and 
have decided that all their grievances 

"steV* th ° r<?U * hly aDd »t»tf «/ ad- 



New Law Affecting Public Work* In 
New York. 

The following is the text of the 
new bill signed by Governor Roose- 
velt. The labor unions of the state 
will see to it that the provisions are 
faithfully complied witli : 

" An act to amend Chapter 415 of 
the Laws of 1897. entitled ' An Act in 
Relation to Labor, constituting 
Chapter 32 of the general laws' rela- 
tive to the hours of labor and the 
prevailing rate of wages. 

"Section 1 . Stction third of 
Chapter 415 of the laws of 1.S97, 
entitled ' An Act in relation to tubor, 
constituting Chapter 33 of the general 
laws, ' is hereby amended to read as 
fallows : 

" Eight hours shall constitute a 
legal day's work for all classes of 
employees in this state except those 
engaged In farm and domei-tic service 
unless otherwise provided by law. 
This section does not prevent an 
agreement for overwork at an increased 
compensation e\cept upon work by or 
for the state or a municipal corpora- 
tion or by contractors or sub con- 
t-actors therewith. 

" Each contract to which the state 
or a municipal corporation is a party 
which may involve the employment 
of laborers, workmen or mechanics 
shall contain a stipulation that no 
laborer, workman or mechanic In the 
employ of the contractor, sub ex- 
tractor or other person doing or con- 
tracting to do the whole or a part of 
the work contemplated by the con- 
tract, shall be permitted or required 
to work more than eight hnurs in any 
one calendar day. except in cases of 
extraordinary emergency caused by 
fire, flood or danger to life or property. 

' The wages to be paid for a legal 
day's work as hereinbefore defined to 
all classes of such laborers, workmen 
or mechanics upon all such public 
woik or upon any material to be used 
upon or in connection therewith shall 
not be less than the prevai ing rate 
for a day's work in the same trade or 
occupation in the locality within the 
state where such public work on, 
about or in connection with which 
such labor Is performed in its final or 
completed form is to be situated, 
erected or used. 

1 1 Each such contract hereafter made 
shall contain a stipulation that enrh 
such laborer, workman or mechanic 
employed by such contractor, sub- 
contractor or other person, on, about 
or upon such public work, shall 
receive such wages herein provided 
for. 

" ICach contract for such public 
work hereafter made shall contain a 
provision that the same shall be void 
and of no effect unless the person or 
corporation making or performing the 
same shall comply with the provis- 
ions of this section ; and no such per- 
son or corporation shall be entitled to 
receive any sum, nor shall anyollicer, 
agent or employee of the state or of a 
municipal corporation pay the same 
or authOiize its payment from the 
funds under his charge or control to 
any such person or corporation for 
work done upon any contract which 
in its r orm or manner of performance 
violates the provisions of this seciion, 
but nothing In this section shall be 
construed to apply to persons regu- 
larly employed in state institutions. 

"Section 4 ol chapter 415 of the 
laws of 1897, article 1, entitled 'An 
act in relation to labor constituting 
chapter 32 of the general lawB. * is 
hereby amended so as to read as 
follows : 

" Any officer, agent or employee 01 
this state or of a municipal corpora- 
tion therein having a duty to act in 
the premises, who violates, evades or 
knowingly permits the violation ar 
evasion of any of the provisions of 
this act, shall be guilty of malfeas- 
ance in office and shall be suspended 
or removed by the authority having 



power to appoint or remove such 
ollicer. agent or employee, otherwise 
by the Governor. 

"Any citizen 01 this state may 
maintain proceedings for the suspen- 
sion or removal of such ollicer, agent 
or employee or may maintain an action 
for the purpose of securing the can- 
cellation or avoidance of any contract 
which, by its terms or manner of per- 
formance, violates this act, or for the 
purpose of preventing any officer, 
agent or employee of sach municipal 
corporation from paying or authoriz- 
ing the payment of any public money 
for work done thereupon, 

" All acts or parts of acts inconsist- 
ent with the provisions of this act, in 
so tar as they are inconsistent, are 
hereby repealed. But nothing in this 
act shall apply to any existing con- 
tract for public work. 

"This act shall take efiect Immedi- 
ately." 



When Papa's Sick. 



When pi pa "I airk, my K "> unite* I 

-nth awful, n it I ill times it m«k», 
lie speak* in uli 1 such lonesome tones. 
A tul give* such ghtsily kind <>( g loans 
A [1(1 roll* hi- eyes Hint hold* hia head, 
Anil makes tn a h(-l ji tiim uji to tied 
While Sis and Bridget run lei heat 
Hot water bag- t» warm his fell. 
And I ntust get Hie doctoi quick 
ti't hair It) mm? uhrn tafia' t it. t. 

When piitja'a sick mi hn* to starrt 

Kight Hide the bed and hold hid hand. 

While sia s >e hns to fan an' fan. 

l or he say* he " a dyln' man,' 1 

And wants the children round him to 

Be there when " sullerin' pa gets through " 

Ami ki-ft ua alt and then he'll die , 

Ttieu tnoani ■ tid ss\s him blent bin's thick 

It's awful -.id when papa's sick. 

When p ip. i s sick he acts lh;tt way 

I'nlil he hrai - thed>>ctor *a 

"You've only got a cold, you know, 

You'll he all right'a a dav or si/* 

And then - well, any 1 you ought to see, 

If £,*% different .is a man can be. 

A nd growls and acolds from noon to nigltl 

Just Valise his dinner .lin t cooked right, 

And all he does i- fnaa Mini kick 

il r'tr alt mr.t a/ I krn fiafia'i lf< f . 

Jul. I.IM OI.N. 



The Poor Man's Burden. 



Pile on the poor in in 'a burden 

Drive out the 1 eaatly Lit ed , 
t.olund his sons in eaile 

To aerve your pride and greed. 
To wnll. in heavy harnesa, 

t'pon your rich and grand ; 
The c Ttimun working peoples. 

The aerf- of every land, 

Pile on the poor mio'i burden - 

Hi* patience will abide . 
He II veil the threat of terror 

And check the show of pride . 
liy pioua cant and humbug 

You'll show his pathw ay plain, 
To work for another'* prr.fit, 

And suffer on in pain 

Pile on I he poor man * burden - 

Your aavaRe wnrs imrease. 
(live him hia full of famine. 

Nor bid lit* slcknrxM cense 
And wh'-n vour goal 1* net real 

Yi.ur gloty s I early bought, 
for the poor man to hi- fury 

May bring your pride to naught. 

pile on the poor man's Linden 

Your monopolistic rings 
Shall crush the ai-rf* -ind aweepet 

Uke iron rule of kings 
Your joy* he shall not enter, 

Nor pleaiant roads ahull tread . 
He will make them with hia living. 

And mar them with his dead, 

Pile on Hie poor man'* burden 

Theday of reckoning's near- 
fie will <ntl aloud on freedom, 

And freedom's Cod shall hear. 
He will try you (n the balance ; 

He will deal oul justice true ; 
I'or the poor man wllh hia tmrden 

Weigh* more wtth r.ud than you. 

Lift off the paor man'a Linden 

My country, grand and great- 
The orient baa no treasures 

Tu buy a Christian atate. 
Our souls brook not oppression, 

Our needs if read arlgh: 
Call not for wide possession. 

But freedom'* aacred light. 

Oro. H. McNmn l.. 



[ 



5 




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FOR TAX. PINB AND SUPPLIES. 
During the month ending March 81, 1899. 
Whenever any errors appear not'fy the G. S.-T. 
without delay. 



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When Men are Strongest, 

. The muscles, in common with all 
the organs of the body, have their 
Stages of development and decline. 
Our physical strength increases up to 
a certain age and then decreases. 
Tests of the strength of several thou- 
sands of people have been made by 
means of a dynamometer (strength 
measurer), and the following are 
given sa the average figures (or the 
white race : 

The "lifting power" of a youth of 
seventeen years Is 280 pounds, in 
his twentieth year this increases to 
320 pounds, and in the thirtieth and 
thirty -first year it reaches it; height, 
356 pounds. At the end of the thirty- 
firat year the strength begins to 




i OR TA\, PINS AND SUPPLIES. 
During the moiilli ending April 30, lSDQ, 

Whenevi-i any errora appeal notify the G.S.-T. 
without delay. 



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153 


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27 1 - 17 HI 


I'.li -III Mil 


[,i 


» Ml 


270 H '.HI 


Wl — .in mi 


1.0 


2 lli 


27 — 10 (Hi 


in 1 ; in 


11x1 


31 x 


2711- Hi Oil 


NtR* 11 XI 


Ii. 1 


(1 IX 1 


jsii - I | OH 


,",|:j ;fj sn 


lii.l_- 


|n ;ji 


2* 1 — '2 xj 


,|,", |'i 211 


141- 


2 -11 


2s2 II hi 


■",21 — M (III 


lii.-,- 


ti "0 


2» ; — HI Hi 


(22 1 1 t»i 


iiiii- 


li IHl 


2^| -_ |ll HI 


2(1 32 *H* 


H.7- 


20 HI 


2s 1 III HI 


5 II — — . 3 HI 


Hiv— 


13 XI 




.17- 32 2li 


l«t— 


.11 XI 


2st_ . 4 on 


.Wl s 21 1 


17(1 


:i mi 


2s.s •, 'Ml 


5IS3> I7n Hi 1 


171 - 


7 2H 


2ftl — In IH* 


j.', 21* 


172 . 


III 11 


2'iu- III HI 






2 21 1 


-•"1 15 2*i 


-7x1 7 21* 


171 - 




2' '2 - III Hi 


5s 1 1 s 2' 1 


175 _ 


12 '"I 


2'i ; |0 tHi 


,\Ss || H, 


17U — 


I , HI 


£,|_ in in 


.V.i| s HI 


177— 


II UU 


2-i v- 1 sn 


.Vi2 |7 '.HI 


I7x 


5 III 


2urS — in 1 n 


rxci — 11 40 


I7H- 


lli H> 


'IHl il HI 


, 1 ; , l", 


IM — 1 


02 20 


.JO— 2S Su 


1,1 1 s Ml 


1x2 — 


HI In 


:X>1— tl 7., 


(112 - H H' 


|H3 - 


17 '.HI 


US — .'1 00 


(117 - 5 iXI 


IV, 


h; im 


irnti - .7 xi 


022 — 17 mi 


tMHta 


t HI 


|!*2 hi 


I2s :i XI 


1*7 


1, Ml 


II 1 — s .XI 


i,:;s s In 


l-'.i- 


in 


31 li— 3 IXI 


IttH- —12 2(1 


I'.HI 


7 HI 


:2: — 2 in 


(t'm 1 IHl 


I'll- 


1. IHl 


:»S — 12 ■ h * 


K5U — Id :m 


IH2- 


III HI 


'.27 . H' 


H.s :s HI 


IW 

1"! 


XI H' 
] l.ll 


[US - 1 : xi 
XXI — 1 20 


mi — is on 

H07- 1 HI 


1'.., - 




::::.i — :i 2n 


«7i. - 21 1 


H'7 


1 55 


;;:i 3 10 


07s K 2*t 


IM - 


il 00 


.',111 — 7s jo 


*is7- - li 20 


I'.IO — 


211 :hi 


:'.I2 2 10 


2 xi 


200- - 


in m 


.U : 1. : xi 


own — 1: 2*1 


2411 


1. XI 


MCI 1 111 


H'ts - , HI 




l!i 2ii 


BtO xi 


711; :; 50 


•ma— 


III 20 


:; .2 s :so 


7117- - II 1 


.Hli_ 


7 SO 


355 s sn 


712 3 HI 


2111; 


17 :hi 


3'Hi— :: U 


711 — s HI 


2ns 


2 XI 


3SH ii Hi 


715 35 20 


JIM — 


1 1 1,11 


!iill — 7 mi 


710. _|M xi 


•-'III 


II III 


X.I -22 70 


717 1 IX) 


21 1 - 


17 in 


111 1 1", Ml 


72i 13 TO 


212 — 


15 211. 


2711 7 1^, 


7211 -II 2H 


211 — 


il 111, 


371 9 1 . 


7:l i — II IXI 


2HI- 


12 Ml 


17 1- I3H 2d 


Till - 3 12 




12 - 


.170 1 HO 


7 HI || 211 


2 hi 


7 Hi 


:s| hi hi 


7.7-- 1 Li 


221- — 


1 2d 


,1M ., XI 


7l.7 1 XI 


22: i_ 


12 711. 3:H - > XI 


7V>— 3 15 



Total 



fii.siH :L' 



decline, very slowly at first. By the 
fortieth year it has decreased S pounds, 
and this diminution continues at a 
slightly increasing rate until the 
fiftieth year la reached, when the 
figure is 330 pounds. 

After this period the strength fails 
more and more rapidly until the weak- 
ness of old age is reached. It la not 
possible to give statistics of the 
decliue of strength after the fiftieth 
year as it varies to a large extent in 
difierent individuals.— Philadelphia 
Times. 

Frank Morrison, secretary of the 
American Federation of Labor, in a 
public communication writes : The 
organizers of the American Federa- 
tion of Labor have been forming 
unions as they have 



RHCHrPTS, MARCH, 1MJ!I. 

From the Unions, tax, etc J7.1W W 

" Subscribers 3 00 

" Clearancei 2 20 

" Miicellaneoua and D. C T5 

" Rent 20 00 

nalance, March I, IRJS 20.300 30 

Total JLT.VlTlti 

Total expenses. 5 345 33 

Cash balance, April, 1K0H f '2.' 150 v. 



DRTAILKD HXPHNSHS, MAKC1I, 

Printing 1000 itamped envelopes • • I 
" 'A ream wrapping paper . . 

O.IXJO German ConKtitntioni . 

SIX) poalal receipta 

5 000 letter head* 

2,000 P. S. blanks 

" 5. OuO applications 

" 2"i 20-page day books . .... 
" 100 P. S, receipt books .... 
" 2,ll00treaaury remit, blanks . 
" .70S password circulars . . 

10.000 English Constitutions . 
" 1H.250 copies March Cakpbm- 

Tl B 

Expressnge on March Cakpkrtbr . . 

Printing HJ) circulars , . 

Hostage on March Carpentlk .... 
Hngravings for March " .... 
Special writers tor " " .... 

Press Clipping Bureau 

Kleveu telegrams 

Kxpressage on supplies, etc 

Post 1 g- " " 

1.CO0 stamped envelopes ....... 

i r 00 postals 

Office rent for March 

Salary and cletk hire : 

Tax to A . K. of I 

Kuhber seals and daters 

p J, McGuire, traveling expenses . . 
Geo. R. Kdsall, in Kenney law suit . . 
R. E Weaver, o-j,. Traverse City. 

Mich 

John Williams, General President . . 
,1 ti M 

* . 

Advertising; commissions 

Incidentals ... 

Janitor, cleaning office 

A. Kaliach. attorney 

Sliirdevant and Sturdevant, attorneys 
Judgment and costs in the Mra. 8. 
Loesch claim. B. St. Louis .... 

Dnion :'32, Los Angelcp, org 

Itcnefits Nos. 1 170 to 4. 01 ....... 



Total . 



■ ■■SB 



f3,3f& -13 



RECEIPTS, APRIL, IS 
Krorn the Unions, tax, etc, ' " ■ 

" Advertisers 

Subacribers 

Miscellaneous sources . . . 
balance, April I.IN'JO ....... 



Total . . . . 
Total expenses 

Cash balxnce, May 1, WW 



- . . . $B,SH 32 

.... 12 50 

. . . . 3 00 

.... 4 (XJ 

.... J22.15H US 

.... |2S,90S 25 

.... 7,ttl» ,54 



■ * » * 1 * 



f2l,:'-4.s U 



DETAILED KXPENSES-APRIL, ISDtt. 





fl 50 


. . 


1,030 stamped envelopes . 


1 '2 ■ 




10 label books 


7 50 




■111 advertising contracts . 


2 50 


.. 


100 Treasurers' cash books . 


30 00 


XI 


1.000 organizing circulars . 


2 50 


M 


5,000 membership cards , . 


12 A) 


«, 


5,000 application blanks . . 


7 30 


■ , 




12 00 



before. During March, April and 
May we have issued over double the 
number of charters that we did during 
the years of 1897 and 1S9S. 



A Vigorous Veteran. 



Brother Samuel S. Fawcett, of Local 
Union No. 3, living in New Alexander, 
Columbiana Co., Ohio, is eighty-aix 
years and seven months old. He has 
worked as a carpenter for sixty-eight 
years, and Is anxious to learn if there 
is an older member of the craft alive 
to day. Brother Fawcett is in excel- 
lent health. He ha., been a member 
of the union for nearly eleven years, 
and is still activt. enough to do a 
good day's work. 



Special writers for TiiKCARPBNTitB. I 41 CO 

Press Clipping Bureau ........ 6 00 

Is telegrams 7 2K 

Kxpressage on supplies, etc :;l OH 

Postage on supplies, etc 21 si 

1 <>0o stamped envelopes and 

1 ,000 postals 20 20 

Quarterly rent P. O. Iloz 3 00 

Office rent for April 50 00 

Judgment in the l.oesch claim, E. St. 

Louis, ill. TO 3fi 

Ham lit and Borders, attorneys .... fin 00 

Fire Insurance Premium ....... 15 80 

Judgment In the Caldwell claim, Spring- 

del.], Ill 8;! 15 

Salary and clerk hire 301 08 

Tax to A. P. of l„ (March) 88 * ~t 

Magistrate Elscnbrowu, warrant . . . 3 50 

Abner Kaliach attorney 25 00 

P, J McGwire, travelling expenses . . 17 *5 

T. K. Heath, organising Danville 111. . •"» 00 

S. J. Kent, visit to Cmaha, Neb 5 t& 

W. G. Gredlg, organizing Augusta, Ga. 00 
F. H. May field, 01 ganixlng Argentine, 

Kanaaa 7 X) 

J. Thomas, organizing work ..... HO 00 

Advertising Commissions 100 00 

John Williams, General President, 

visits tu Seranton, Philadelphia Pa., 

and Troy, N. V 113 21 

John Williams, attending G. E. B. . . 82 75 

James M. Lane, " " 01 45 

H. C. Witt, " " . . 63 10 

A. C. CaltermuH " " . . ltd 00 

J. R. Miller, " " . . 129 75 
J. R. Miller (investigating Schneider 

case) . 8 2'. 

W. J. Williams, attending G. K. B. . . 120 85 

Advertising in Philadelphia papers . . 2 :XJ 

Stationery and incidentals 2 77 

Removing office fixtures, sup, 'ies and 

carpenter work Hi 4S 

Removing office safe 12 U0 

Changing safe combination I 00 

Sign boards, lettering, etc. ..... . 35 00 

Office furniture Id 75 

Office fixtures 1 00 

Hardware for office fixtures 2 05 

..... — vt 

Staining and varnisbing fixtures . . IS SO 

Carpets, etc, for general offices ... *it 02 

Carpet aweeper and rugs :: ."Hi 

Office desk and chairs 58 25 

Incidentals in moving office 1 40 

Benefits Nos. KM to 4514 5,525 00 



Total 



|7,*i4« 51 



Approved In April, 1899. 



No, 

tun. 

4503. 

4XJ1 

4.-X).-,. 

4'XXi. 

4507. 

450H. 

45UH. 

4510. 

4511. 

4512. 

4.MS. 

4 Mi 

4515. 

4516. 

4517. 

4518. 

toll). 

4520. 

4531, 

4.»2i. 

im. 

4521. 
Utt. 
IttB, 
4527. 
I.V28. 
4.V2H, 

an 

4531. 
4582. 

15*!. 

15S4. 
45:15, 
4536 

tm. 

1538, 

vm 

4510. 

4.541 

4512 

454H. 

1644. 



Namb. Unioh 

Mrs. Anna Gehrig 1 

Thomas J. H ey ward , . . . 1 

Lucius Judd 7 

John McCambly 8 

Mrs. Selma Homana 10 

frank Kinhorn 10 

John Garthe 12 

Mrs. Maria FrBux 'JO 

Mrs, Sarah McGoey 42 

Phillip H Karih 01 

G. A. Hitiner t:2 

Mrs. Elisabeth Sntcliffe . . 04 
Mrs. Josephine B. Li tu berg . 70 
Olie I. Graven ....... M7 

Frsncois Gibe an 90 

Mra. Mellisa C. Patterson . . loll 

James D. Johnston 10U 

T. A. Wilson , 114 

Mrs. Katherine I. Bowser . . 12-1 

Theodore Boon 125 

Mra. Anna Dolphin 125 

K, T. Cnllen 133 

Wm. W. Waters 167 

Chaa. A. t -idborg 174 

David Scobte 178 

Mrs. 9. E. Reinecke l»l 

Mrs. Flora F Widenbeck ... 11(8 
Jacob M. Stewart ...... 2:111 

Margaret E. McMllleo .... 288 

August BuUky 30» 

Pried rich Plaff m 

Rudolph Hanging SOU 

Alex. Paihoczy SOU 

Wm. J. Towey 1140 

Mrs. Amanda Dunlap .... 3SK 

Andrew Hoffmann 375 

John Friedcl 375 

Mrs. Elizabeth Wood ... - 383 

Daniel Clayton 882 

Mrs. Georgian a L. Seymour . 

Wra, Reid 427 

Mrs. Elite Kautz -40-1 

Mrs Emma Oral 476 



Am't, 
$ 50 00 

200 00 
200 00 
200 00 
. 4) 00 
200 00 
200 CO 
50 00 
."X) 00 
200 00 

200 00 
;'fl U) 
50 00 

200 00 
50 00 
50 00 

400 00 
50 00 
50 00 

200 00 
GO 00 

100 00 

200 00 

100 00 

200 00 
50 00 
50 00 

200 00 
50 00 

200 1)0 





UWON -MAD E GOODS 

QSit 4*H( li/Ct rta a- ^ i*^'*** c 



MKtl<i 



THE CARPENTER. 



New Unions Chartered during the 
Past Three Months. 



Union 
Union 
Union 
Union 



145. Sayre, Pa. 
153, Helena, Mont. 
201, Wichita, Kan. 

204, CoiTeen, 111. 

205, Terre Haute, Ind. 
219, Memphis, i'enn. 
226, Traverse City, Mich. 
240, Augusta, Ga. 

253, Argentine, Kan. 

254, Pittsburg, Pa. (stair 



4S, Kirksville, Mo. 
63, Hloomington, III. 
75, Birmingham, Ala. 
107, Pensacola, Fla. (Col ) 
Union ri3, I,lncoln, Neb. 
Union 1 iS, Jersey City, N. J. (mill 
men). 

Union 13a, Buffalo, N. V. (mill 
men). 
Union 
Union 
Union 
Union 
Union 
Union 
Union 
Union 
Union 
Union 
builders) 
Union 
Union 
Union 
Union 
Union 
Union 
Union 
Union 
Union 
Union 
Union 
Union 
Union 
penters). 
Union 
Union 
Union 
Union 
Union 
Union 
Union 
Union 
Union 
Union 
Union 
Union 
Union 
Union 
Union 
Union 



267, 

2fi<l, 
2 7°. 

271, 
27K. 

279. 

2 So, 
2S.\ 
2S3, 

884, 
**$, 

2S9, 
290, 
292, 
293. 
294, 

2<if>, 

2y7. 
29S, 

199, 
302, 
303. 
307. 

3°H, 
385, 
495, 

629, 



Diamondville, Wyo. 
Danville, til. 
Madison, 111 
Bay City, Mich. 
Wallace, Idaho. 
Oklahoma, Ok. Ter. 
Watertown, N, Y. 
South Omaha, Neb, 
Mount Olive, III. 
Jersey City, N. J. 
Augusta, Ga. 
Fort Dodge, Iowa. 
Bath, Me. (ship 



car- 



I<ockport, N. Y. 
Lake Geneva, Wis. 
Milwaukee, Wis. (Ge*) 
Canton, 111. 
East Palestine, O. 
Hnsley, Ala. 
Kalamazoo, Mich. 
Alamagordo, New Mex. 
West Hoboken, N. J. 
Milwaukee, Wis. (Ger ) 
Detroit, Mich. (Ger.) 
So. Framlngham, Mass. 
Cedar Rapids, Iowa. 
Pittsburg, Pa. 
Streator, 111. 
South Bend, Ind. 



Bight-Hour Cities. 



Below is b lilt of the cities anrl towns where 
carpenteri make it a rule to work only eight 
hours ■ day : 



Alameda, Cat. 
Aila Luiua, Tex. 
Ashland, Wis. 
Austin, til. 
Bakersficki, Cal. 
Bedford Park, N. V, 
Berkeley, Cal. 
Bessemer. Cot. 
Brighton Park. 111. 
Brooklyn, N, Y. 
Carontfelet, Mo. 
Chicago, III. 
Chicago Heights, III. 
Cleveland, O. 
Corona, N. Y. 
Cripple Creek, Col. 
Denver, Col. 
Detroit, Mich, 
Hast St. Loitia, 111. 
El Dara, Col. 
Klmhurat, III. 
Bnglewood, III. 
Eureka, Cal. 
Kvanston, III. 
Flushing, N, Y. 
Fremont. Col. 
Fresno. Cal. 
Galveston, Tex. 
Gllette, Co1. 
Grand Crossing. III. 
Haughville, Ind. 
Hauiord. Cat. 
High lend Park, III. 
Hitchcock, Te«. 
Hyde Park, HI. 
Independence, Col. 
Indianapolis, Ind. 
Irvingt on, N. J. 
Kansas City, Mo. 
Kensln gton, 111. 
Klng*brid(te, N. If. 
J,a Junta, Col, 
Lake Forest. 111. 
Lesdvttle, Col. 
Long Island City, N. 
Loa Angelea, Cal. 
Lynn, Maaa. 
Maywood, 111. 
Memphis, Tenn. 
Milwaukee. WIN. 
Moareland, III, 
Mt, Vernon, If. Y. 
Mt. Vernon, Ind. 

Boulder, Colo. 



Murpbysboro, 111. 
Newark, N J. 
New Brighloii, N. Y. 
Newtown, N. Y. 
New York. N. Y. 
Oakland, Cal. 
Oak Park, 111. 
Omaha, Neb. 
Orange, N. J. 
Ouray, Col, 
Pasadena, Cal. 
Port Richmond, N. Y. 
Pueblo, Col. 
Kandnburg, Cal, 
Rochester, N. Y, 
Kogera Park, III. 
Sacramento, Cal. 
Salt I.nke, t'tah. 
Ban Antonio, Tea. 
San Praii ciaco, Cal. 
Sau I,tiin ubispo, Cal. 
Ban Jone, Cal. 
San Rafael. Cal. 
Santa Barbara, Cal. 
Seattle, Wash. 
Sheboygan, Wla, 
South Chicago, III. 
South r»nver, Col, 
South Kvanston, 111, 
South Knglewood. I1L 
South Omaha. Neb. 
Spokane, Wash, 
Springrirlri, 111. 
St. Louis, Mo. 
St a pi no ii, N, Y. 
Stockton, Cal. 
Swampacott, Maaa. 
Syracuse, N. Y. 

Town of take, 111. 
Tremout, N. Y. 
Union port, N. Y. 
Van Neat, N. Y. 
Venice, 111 
Y. Victor, Col. 
Waco, Tei. 
Washington, D. C 
Westchester, N. Y. 
Whatcom, Wash. 
Williamsbridge, N. Y. 
Woodtawn, N. Y. 
. N. Y* 



Germany's Anti-Strike Bill. 

A dispatrh from Berlin states that 
the Reichstag has received the anti- 
strike bill and will consider it at an 
early date. The provisions of the 
bill are now less stringent than the 
Kmperor at first intended. 

The measure provides that whoever 
threatens to forcibly prevent persons 
from going to work will be sentenced 
to a maximum of a year's imprison 
ment. Where there are extenuating 
circumstances a line of r.OOO marks 
will be Imposed 

The same punishment will be meted 
out to those who threaten a boycott 
to compel employers or employees to 
desist from work, or who, during a 
lockout, try to force employers or 
employees to yield to their demands, 
or whoever threatens to maltreat or 
otherwise molest non- strikers. 

The bill is not likely to pass before 
the adjournment of the Reichstag 
and it is not likely to pass at all in 
its present shape. 

Mail Sign Crder. 



Coal Production of Last Year. 




Upon complaint of the labor organ- 
izations that street car companies, 
against which there w as a labor strike, 
were illegally using the words " U S. 
Mail " to insure the running of their 
cars, the Postmaster- General some 
time ago prepared an order on the sub 
ject. This order was made public last 
week in the official bulletin, and reads : 

"Order No, 225. 

"Hereafter no street car company 
having a contract for the transporta 
tion of United States mail shall dis- 
play the words 1 U S. Mail, ' or their 
equivalent, upou any cars except 
those in which the mall is actually 
carried. Such companies must pro- 
vide portable signs bearing the words 
1 U. S Mail, ' which shall be displayed 
on cars only when the United States 
mail is being transported therein. 

"The sign 1 U. S. Mall' must not 
be painted on or displayed from cars 
having street letter boxes attached 
thereto, the boxes themselves being a 
sufficient Indication that United States 
mail is carried on the cars. This order 
does not in any way affect street cars 
used exclusively for the transporta- 
tion of United States mail. 

" Charles Kmory Smith, 
"Postmaster General," 




Hoboken, N. J 
Jersey Ctly.N. J. 



From "Hurry Up," S\. Louis. 

Sir— Please send me the sizes and 
outline of this hole : For iron boiler 
pipe 16 Inches in diameter ; -dtch of 
roof, 60 degrees. 



IK " Statistics of the Pro- 
duction of Coal in the 
United States During 1898 
have just been computed 
by lid ward \V. Parker sta- 
tistician of the United States Geologi- 
cal Survey. The compilation shows 
that the total production of all kinds 
of coal in [898 reached the enormous 
6gure of 8t9.835.993 short tons, an 
increase or nearly 10 per cent, over 
the output in 1897, which amounted 
in round figures to 200, 210, ooo tons, 
and was, up to that time, the largest 
tonnage ever obtained in the United 
States, 

Great Britain's product in [S-iS was 
226,287,31-' short tons, a slight de- 
crease from 1S97. Practically all of 
the increase in production in the 
United States was in bituminous coal, 
the output of anthracite coal in 1 898 
being 45 $t$.943 long tons, an increase 
of only a little over 700 "oo tons over 
1S97. Of this increase 470,000 tons 
were ; n the amount of coal consumed 
at the collieries themselves, so the 
total increase in the amount of coal 
actually marketed was only 330,000 
tons. There was a decrease m the 
selling value of anthracite coal of 
$3,874,000, while the bituminous pro- 
duct increased in value f8.oio.ooO. 

There were only three states in the 
Union whose coal product in 189H was 
less than that of These were 

Illinois, whose production 'ell oil" 
>i 473)459 ions, credited entirely to 
labor troubles, and Montana and 
Oregon, whose decrease was com- 
paratively unimportant. Among the 
bituminous coal producing states the 
largest increase was in Pennsylvania, 
where 10 557,953 tons were added to 
the 1897 bituminous product, the total 
amount mined reaching 65,155844 
tons. 

West Virginia's product increased 
2,437,000 tons, reaching a total of 
16,835,019 short tons. Ohio, with a 
total of 14,476,500 short tons, in- 
creased 2,2X0,000 tons. The next 
state in importance Is Alabama, with 
a total output of 0,553,000 tons in 
189S; an increase of 659000 short 
tons. Indiana increased 870,000 tons, 
reaching a total of a little over 5 ooo,. 
000 tons. 

Arkansas showed a 40 per cent, in- 
crease. Statistician Parker thus com- 
ments on the showing made: "The 
large increase in the production of 
bituminous coal and the comparative 
stationary condition of anthiacite in- 
dustry calls attention to the increased 
competition of bituminous coal and 
Its products of gas and coke for 
domestic consumption with that of 
anthracite coal. For a number of 
years the anthracite producers have 
experienced a great deal of difficulty 
In keeping the production within the 
market demands and incidentally re 
striding the product necessarily in- 
creased the cost of mining and cor- 
respondingly necessitates higher sell- 
ing prices for the coal. Each advance 
In the selling price of this fuel makes 
customers for the coke and gas prod- 
ucts of bituminous coal, 

" The increasing use of mechanical 
methods of mining bituminous coal 
has nraterlally reduced the cost of 



mining, and while the anthracite 
producers are faced with a continually 
increasing cost of their own product, 
they are also ohliged to meet a r,,m. 
petitor whose cost of production has 
been steadily decreasing. It apt ears 
front the general condition of the an. 
thracite and bituminous coal mining 
industries that anthracite coal is be- 
coining more and ni'>re of a luxury 
and it will finally be restricted to 
markets win re the price is merely 
incidental." 



Word* of the Wl.e, 



NOTHING that Is unjust can bopeu 
continue in this world Car/ylr. 

WHEN labor is employed, la'w 
consumes ; when it is not employed, 
it cannot consume Daniel Wehtet, 

iNKyr.u.irv is the source of all 
revolutions, for no compensation can 
make up for inequality -Aristotle, 
Jt 

No INDIVIDUAL life can l>e truly 
prosperous passed in the midst of 
those who sutler. To the noble tool 
it cannot be happy ; to the ignoble it 
cannot be secure -Afatlktw Arnold 

EVERY man ou^ht to stand in pri- 
mary relations with the work of the 
world, ought to do it himself, andn'jt 
sutler the accident of his having a 
purse In his pocket, or his having 
been bred to some dishonorable craft, 
to sever him from those duties— and 
for this reason that labor is God* 
ed ucation. — h'nskin . 



Folk Lore. 



If a peahen calls, a donkey brays, 
pijjs carry straw, geese flap their 
wings, a pot biils dry or the clouds 
move northward it will rain. 

If a silver coin or fresh-laid egg is 
placed in the hand of anew-b<»rn babe 
long liTe and prosperity will be assured 
to it. 

If the sun goes down behind a ban It 
of clouds on Friday it will rain on 
Sunday. 

While peacock feathers are kept in 
the house sickness will never be out 
of it. 

If a person 's two front teeth are wide 
enough apart to place a gold coin be- 
tween them he will always be rich. 

If one mends a garment while wear- 
ing it every atitch taken represents an 
enemy which will be made. 

If a pen drops and sticks in the II Dor 
the owner's lover lives in the direction 
toward which it inclines. 

A ring around the moon Indicates 
bad weather, which will last as many 
days an there are stars inclosed in the 
circle. 

If a hairpin sticks out but does not 
fall the wearer will have a disappoint- 
ment, if it falls her lover is thinking 
of her. 

If a spider is found on one of your 
garments It signifies that you will 
soon have a new one of the same sort. 

Be sure that for every fog you get 
in March you will have a frost in May. 

If the thread knots while sewing 
the sewer will live to 
worn out. 



THE CARPENTER. 



The Price 01 a rtilUon, 



JVERY now and then you see 
in the newspapers an in- 
terview with some million- 
aire describing his strug- 

;rles and successes. If these 
confessions are to be believed, there 
are two methods of acquiring great 
wealth. One is genius. Uy Could, 
who never saved a penny in his life, 
had this sort of genius. The othtr 
method, alone worth discussing, may 
he fairly described as " keeping your 
eye on the main chance." 

A dozen mitHouairei have explained 
their systems of money -getting, and 
one and all may km summed up in the 
one work : "Application." If you 
wish to make money you must give 
your whole mind to it. " It is not 
what vou make, but the proportion 
you J=ave that makes you rich," Mr. 
Sage says. " Accumulate, "pays Mr. 
Huntington. " I never spent one 
cent on luxury or pleasure until I 
was paft fifty. " 

Any young man not absolutely an 
imbecile can amass vast sums of 
money by applying his energies 
solely to thfit end. The beggar of 
one-and -twenty who sets himselr 
resolutely to make as much and spend 
as little as he can is pretty sure to be 
a tolerably rich man, if he live three- 
score years. Sagacity is a good thing 
to have ; education is useful ; but the 
main thing is self denial. .Mr. Sage, 
Mr. Rockefeller. Mr. Huntington and 
a dozen others all hear witness that 
self denial is the road to great wealth. 

Nothing could be plainer. The 
young man who wishes to he rich has 
merely to learn the ;irt of "doing 
without." He must learn to strip 
himself of Die unnecessary. He most 
deny himself wife, children, fru-nds 
deny himself social pleasures and per- 
sonal luxuries deny himself every- 
thing that does not aid him in his 
struggle to be rich A dollar saved 
is much more than a mere dollar -it 
is the potentiality of wealth. A dol- 
lar saved and sent out to work for its 
master is the beginning of wealth. 

Unquestionably, the man who " sets 
his heart " on making money must 
deny himself a great deal. He 
reaches his goal only by dropping 
nn the way almost atl that h worth 
living for. His Ufe is robbed of many 
hours of happiness that should be in 
it. In that hard, self-centered game 
of getting money he loses Hie faculty 
nf enjoyment, Friends are luxuries 
far too costly for the struggling mil- 
lionaire When be lias succeeded, 
When he is "past fifty," he may, to 
be sure, buy a friend or two— but 
such friends are as unsatisfactory as 
artificial flowers. It is too late for the 
pleasures of social sympathy ; too 
late for the pleasures of art. 

He may shut himself up In his 
library, with Shelley 's " Skylark," and 
say, " Now I will entertain thoughts 
too deep for tears"; but it will be 
only to find his appreciations atro- 
phied. The millionaire, according to 
his confessions, pays dearly for his 
millions. His life is negative, barren, 
g ra y —except in bo far as the accumu- 
lation of wealth repays him for giving 
up all that men love best. 

Fifty years of exacting labor and 
rigid self denial in thla country of 



abundant opportunity will make any 
man of average intelligence rich. 
Upon the truth of th.s statement the 
rich men are agreed. 

Hut is it worth while? 

To decry wealth is as vulgar as to 
worship it. No man is willingly poor. 
Indeed, the poor man is only a man 
WHO wants to be rich. And that is 
well and good. He is but a fool who 
does not plant seeds of trees in his 
youth that he may have fruit and 
shade in old age. Hut on the road 
that leads to great wealth there seems 
to be far too many occasions for sacri- 
fice. You must deny yourself the 
pleasure of helping your friends, of 
enjoy ir- the costly luxuries of good 
society and good books and good 
music ; you must deny yourself all 
those things that are worth living for, 
and that, as well, teach you how to 
live. 

And then- "after fifty" — when 
life has cooled and hardened into 
habit, it is too late to bring yourself 
into touch with the ways of men who 
do not practice self denial, but spend 
and are spent in the service of hu- 
manity. 

On the whole, after hearing the evi- 
dence of the millionaires, I am in- 
clined to believe that the game of 
making millions is not worth the 
candie. There are not enough dollars 
in a million to repay one for denying 
himself wife and children, friends and 
books, and the pleasure— reckless 
though it be — of giving a dinner to 
the tramp at the doo«- or the beggar 
in tut street — lame Thompson in 
Philadelphia Evening J'osi. 

— — m — — — — — 

Our Porto RJcan Farm. 



where one likes to lie in a hammock 
and dream of the things one is too in- 
dolent to do. The population is a 
trifle over 800,000, and only 14 per 
cent, know how to read and write. 
About half the population is "white." 
In Porto Kico "white" means those 
in whom there Is at most only a touch 
of negro blood. 

Mr. Robinson thinks the natives 
had little reason to complain of Span- 
ish rule. The system of government 
was admirable. Its laws were ade- 
em ate and In the main just and equit- 
able. The Spanish did not "work 
the island for all it was worth." Con- 
sidering the richness of the soil, the 
populous districts and the well to do 
little cities, the taxation was by no 
means excessive. On the whole, the 
people seem to have been happy and 
prosperous. Many of the natives are 
rich, though the majority— as the 
majority are everywhere— are poor. 
But in a land where life is easy and 
wants are few, poverty is a condition 
rather than an evil. Porto Rico Is a 
farm and not a workshop. Its re- 
sources are almost exclusively agri- 
cultural. The main products are coffee, 
sugar and tobacco, while rum and 
molasses are important by- products. 
Among the possibilities are canning 
and exporting fruit and vegetables 
and cattle raising. 



If you "want something to do," 
don't go to Porto Rico. It is a 
pleasant place for an outing, but that 
is all. TheTe is little enough to inter- 
est the capitalist and Investor, but for 
the clerk, the workman, the position- 
hunter there is absolutely nothing. 

In time there may be something, 
but it will be at the least, many 
months before such opportunities are 
open, and even then they will be few. 
Until then the case is hopeless, and 
those who go will but do is their pre- 
decessors have done— come home 
again poorer and wiser men. 

This seems to be the gist of Albert 
Gardner Robinson's "The Porto Rico 
of To-Day " (The Century Company, 
New York)— a book as sensible as it 
is entertaining. 

The native name of Porto Rico is 
Boriquen the Land of W»« Valiant 
I.ord. The area of the b is about 
jf.im square miles— half tuaj of New 
Jersey. The leading cities are San 
Juan, Ponce and Maysguez, all sea- 
coast towns, and, as the highways are 
primitive and rough, the interior is 
almost cut off from the outside world. 

This inland of the blue sea Is covered 
with eternal summer. The average 
temperature is about eighty d grees. 
There is not an overcoat to be found 
on the island. Our fellow- country- 
men go clad In thin cotton the year 
round, while the youngsters under 
ten wear no more clothes than an 
angle worm. 

It is a lazy world. The Porto Rican 
heat saps the energies, both physical 
and mental. It la the sort of a place 



"Will you keep Werden in my 
place?" continued Dean, earnestly. 

' ' Yes, if you want to go. " 

"All right, sir ; here is my resig- 
nation." 

It was a little late when Will got 
home to Mary last night. But his 
face was full of light again, and she 
knew that something good had hap- 
pened. He ran over to her couch with 
the step of a boy. 

"I'm going to stay, dear." he said. 
"The company will keep me in Dean 
Waters* place." 

Then he told her all about the gen- 
erous act of the young man, and she 
whispered from a full heart; "God 
bless him," over and over again, 
while Will patted the thin hand that 
lay within his own and sighed happily : 

"Ah, mother, not all the heroes 
were at Santiago."— Chicago Journal. 

When Girls Wore Calico. 



A Brief Romance. 



When the Santa Fe Railroad found 
it necessary to cut down expenses 
Will Werden was one of the men dis- 
charged. There la always material 
for a tragedy around when works shut 
down or great corporations begin to 
retrench on one side that dividends 
may pile up on the other. It looks a 
simple enough thing from the com- 
pany s standpoint to let one man do 
the work of two. "If expenses are 
too great cut them down " is the logi- 
cal reasoning. It is plain business 
here ; on the other side alone are 
seen the colors of tragedy. 

Will Wei den was a good worker. 
He was one of the billing clerks in 
the freight department. But he was 
comparatively a new man, and it was 
considered an act of special justice to 
keep the old employees if any of the 
force must be discharged. But Werden 
had an invalid wife and a half dozen 
little children dependent upon him. 
I.ines appeared in his face as his term 
of service drew to a close. His eyes 
were hollow and full of despair. He 
knew what it was to be out of a job, 
and his wife's Hps trembled as she 
tried to cheer him. 

Then It was that dean Waters came 
to the rescue, like a good comrade on 
life's hard-fought field. He was a 
fellow-workman, and his manly heart 
had ached for Will ever since he heard 
the agent's instructions. He had 
nothing but his salary, but he was on 
the road to promotion, and the com- 
pany had promised to advance him 
right along. But he went to the head 
man yesterday and said : 

" Mr, Blank, if I resign my position, 
can you keep Werden ? " 

• • Yes " The head of the department 
looked at the boyish face wonderlngly 
as he answered, " But you don't want 
to resign. You have good prospects 



There was b time, betwlit the daya 

Of Hnsey woolaey, straight and p-lm, 
And these when mode, with despot ways, 

Leads women captive at its whim, 
Vet not a hundred year* ago. 
When Kit's wore simple calico. 

Within the barn, by lantern light, 

Through many a reel, with flying teet, 
The boys and maidens danced at night 
To fiddled measures, shiilly sweet ; 
And merry revets were they, though 
The girls were gowned In calico. 

Acr iss the flooring rough and gray 

The ROld of scattered chaff was spread, 
And long festoons of clover hay. 
That straggled from the loft o'erheed, 
r>wung scented fringes to and fro 
O'er pret:y girls in calico. 

They used to go a-Maying then, 

The blossoms of the Spring to seek 
In sunny glade and sheltered glen. 
On weighed by fashion "a latest Ireak 
And Robin fell In love, I know. 
With Fhylltain ber calico, 

A tuck, a frill, a bias fold, 

A hat curved o*er gypsy- wise. 
And beads of coral and ol gold, 
And rosy cheeks and merry eyes, 
Made lassies in that long ago 
Look charming in their calico. 

The modern knight who lovea a maid 

Of gracious air and gentle grace. 
And finds her oftentimes arrayed 
Jn shining silk and priceless lace, 
Would lore her just as well, I know, 
In pink and lilac calico. 
-Haiti, H'Mmty, in Mumty'i Ma S at>ne. 

*' W'en a Feller Is Out of a Job." 



"All nature is sick from her he eta to her hair 

W'en a feller is out of a job: 
She is all out of kilter an' out of repair 

W'en a feller is out of a job. 
Atn't no juice in the earth an' no salt tu the sea, 
Ain't no ginger in life in this land of the free, 
An' the universe ain't what It's cracked up to be 

Wen a feller Is out of a job. 

» W il'i the good or blue skies an' of blossom In 
treea 

W'en a feller is out of a job, 
Wen ^er boy. h« large patches on both of hla 



part in the work of the 



An' a feller is out of a job? 
Them patches, 1 say, look so big to your eye 
That they shut 'out lan'scnpe an' cover the sky, 
An' the aim can't ahtue through era the best It 
can try 
Weu a feller la out of a job. 
" W'en a man ha 
earth, 

W'en a feller is out of a job. 
He fee s the who!, blund'rin' mistake ot hla 

birth 

Wen a feller is out of a job ; 

He feels he's no aha re in the wtwle of the plan. 
That lie's got the mitten from natur'aown hand, 
That he a rejected uud leftover man. 

Wen a feller ia out of a jofl. 

" Pat you've jest lost yer holt with the rvat of 
the crowd 
W'en a feller 1* out of a job; 
An' you feel like a dead man with many a shroud, 

Wen a feller Is out of a job. 
You are crawlin' arouu', but yet out of the 
game ; 

Vou may bustle about, but yer dead just the 



Yer dead with no tombstone to puff up 
W'en a feller is out of a Job." 

WaLTBft 




8 



THE CARPENTER. 



THE CARPENTER, 



Eight-Hour History. 



OFFICIAL JOURNAL OF 

United Brotherhood of Carpenters and 
Joiners of America. 

Published Mon'hlyo* th» Fifteenth of each m,«,th. 
AT 

Ijtpplncott Building, Philadelphia, Pa. 

V J. McCuif, e, Hditor and Publisher 

Entered at the Posl-Office at Philadelphia, ra , 
os second-class waiter. 

RriisCRirnoN Price -—Fifty cents a year, in 
advance, postpaid, 
Address all letters and money to 

P. J. MtHuiRK, 
Dos BRt. Philadelphia, ra. 



PHILADELPHIA, JUNE, 1899. 



An Important Law Decision. 



An important decision has just been 
handed down by Justice Glegerick in 
the New York Supreme Court, on an 
application by the New York City 
Carpenters Union for an injunction 
against me United Brotherhood of 
Carpenters and Joiners to prevent the 
latter ordering strikes against the 
members of the former union. This 
decision settles the right of an organi- 
zation to strike against the employ- 
ment of men not members of the 
union. 

The court said : 

" The principles of the decision in 
the quite recent case of Davis VS, 
United Engineers seems to me to be 
decisive of the present application. 
The complaint alleges that the mem- 
bers of the defendant District Council, 
Manhattan Borough, United Broth- 
erhood of Carpenters and Joiners ol 
America, are carpenters and joiners 
banded together chiefly to secure em- 
ployment in said trade or work for 
their members and to prevent other 
members of the same trade not mem- 
bers of said association, from procur- 
ing or retaining such employment, 
and that persons employing members 
of the plaintiff's association were 
coerced into discharging them in order 
to avoid a general strike. 

"Mr. Thomas H. McCracken, a 
member and one of the official repre- 
sentatives of the plaintiff, in his aflida- 
I vit, states that owing to the persis- 
tent and wanton interference by the 
defendants and their representative 
associations with the business of 
plaintiff association the members 
thereof have found it, and are daily 
finding it, more and more difficult to 
obtain and retain employment In their 
trade in New York City and else- 
where. The plaintiff 's further affida- 
vits are substantially to the same 
effect. 

"These acts, according to the rules 
laid down in the case last cited, do 
not entitle the plaintiff to the relief 
sought. Justice Patterson, speaking 
for a majority of the court, then said: 
1 There can be no doubt that members 
of trades unions, as well as other 
individuals, have a right to say that 
they will not work with persons who 
do not belong to their organization ; 
and whether they say It uiemselves 
or through their organized societies 
can make no difference. They have 
the right by that method to secure 
employment for their own members. 
* * * It was necessary for the 
plaintiff to nrove under the averments 
of his complaint * * * that he 
was the subject of a persecution based 
upon a determination to exclude him 
from working at his trade for anybody 
or under any circumstances. ' 

"Applying the foregoing principle 
to the case at bar, it is clear that the 
means used by the defendants were 
lawful, and, hence, the motion for an 
injunction pendente lite must be de- 
nied, with *io ; 



Prior to 1889 in England there was 
little demand for universal legislation 
on the subiect of eight hours a day. 
Parliament had already legislated for 
a twelve and ten-hour day in certain 
industries, and for the protection ot 
women and children in factories and 
workshops, bvt upon the question of 
the universal application of the 
eight-hour principle the old trade 
unionism and the new parted com- 
pany. Upon the latter the work of 
carrying on the agitation developed. 
It was at first proposed for all men 
employed by Government, by munici- 
palities and by other governing 
bodies; next, the adhesion of the 
National Federation of Miners was 
secured, and finally the Trade Union 
Congress of 1S90 proposed " that 
steps should be taken to reduce the 
working hours in all trades to eight 
per day, or a maximum of forty-eight 
per week ; and while recognizing the 
power and influence of trade organi- 
zations it is of opinion that the speed- 
iest and best method to obtain this 
reduction for the workers generally is 
by Parliamentary enactments. ' ' 

An eight- hour bill was drafted in 
1S92 for the benefit of the English 
colliers, but three out of five of the 
members for coal mining electorates 
declined to support it, and it was 
abandoned From 1892 to 1S94 a 
Parliamentary Commission examined 
into the question. Its investigations 
were thorough. All the difficulties 
attendant upon its universal adop- 
tion were examined into. While it 
was asserted that there were diffi- 
culties in applying the principle to 
every branch of trade, it was also 
admitted that the legal reduction of 
the excessively long hours of work of 
the previous generation had improved 
the quality of the work effected, with- 
out reducing its quantity. Nothing 
can emphasize this admission better 
than a recent statement of Mr. Arnold 
F. Hills, managing director of the 
Thames Iron Works. 

What makes this testimony the 
more valuable is that when the Brit- 
ish government was placing its con- 
tracts for warships in 1893-4 not one 
of the contracts was given to his firm 
—the contract price sent in being 
higher than those of the Tyne and 
Clyde shipbuilding companies, chiefly 
owing, it was said at the time, to the 
higher wages pal ill London as com- 
pared with other places. The man- 
aging director of the Thames Iron 
Works testifies that "in 1892 he de- 
cided that everybody should have an 
interest in the work that he did, by 
means of a goodfellowship dividend, 
which should depend upon the real- 
ized profits of the firm, In 1892 the 
amount distributed was /4,o8i, and 
in 1898 it was £1 5,390. During the 
seven years, 1892-98, it amounted to 
,£42,519. This was in addition to 
the highest wages in the trade in this 
or any other country for an eight- 
hour day. In 1894 he decided to 
introduce an eight- hour day. In 1893 
the wages paid were ,699,066, and in 
1898 they were ,£242,336. In seven 
years there had been an increase of 
wages paid of 145 p r cent., which 
was a very remarkable testimony to 
the working of the eight-hour day, 



and showed that the work done was 
becoming more profitable. 

"He had taken out the net cash per 
ton of five vessels built for the gov- 
ernment before the eight- hour day 
had been in trod need, and the cost for 
the two Japanese battleships and a 
cruiser for the British Government 
after, and he found that the latter 
were built at a cost per ton of 17 or 
iS per cent, less than the former. 
And during the past two months the 
Thames Iron Works had. in open 
competition, secured work at a price 
which was the lowest put in by any 
firm. So greatly had their business 
increased that they had taken a yard 
over the river, to which they Intended 
to transfer the eight-hour (lag, which 
had brought nothing but blessing on 
them since it had been adopted. It 
had proved good for the men, good 
for the work and gook for the share- 
holders.' '— Kris ban? {OuceHStand) 
Worker. 



Sent Back to Europe. 



Last week thirty Austro-Hunga- 
rians wore sent by train from Phi la 
delphia to New York, where they 
were placed on board the Red Star 
steamship Friesland, which sailed for 
Antwerp. 

The thirty are the immigrants 
brought to Philadelphia by the Red 
Star steamship Araponia from Antwerp 
on June 2nd, and detained by I nited 
States Commissioner of Immigration 
Rodgers on suspicion of having been 
brought to the United States in viola- 
tion of the alien contract labor law. 
An investigation started by Commis- 
sioner Rodgers developed sufficient 
proof of the fact that the men had 
airanged to go to work for the Illinois 
Steel Company at Chicago immedi- 
ately upon their arrival in that city to 
warrant him in debarring them from 
landing. 



From Springfield, 111. 



On May 1st, Union 16, Springfield, 
111., after a short decisive contest, 
enforced its code of union rules of 
eight hours a day on house carpenter 
work and nine hours in planing 
mills, with $2 25 per day as the min- 
imum pay for house work and 28 
cents per hour the minimum in the 
mills. The card system and steward 
system also are adopted. 



Cincinnati, O. The Carpenters 
District Council has issued a spirited 
protest against the unfair discrimi- 
nation of the management of the 
Saengerfest, and has declared a strike 
on the building. The management 
began the preparations for the " feat" 
with the evident determination to 
ignore all organized labor, and if their 
present puny policy is persevered in 
the Saengerfest will be a flat financial 
failure. 

•J* 

A novki. "strike " met success in 
Pittsburg last week. The pupils of 
the Twenty seventh Ward School in- 
sisted upon half- day sessions until the 
end of the school year and the direc- 
tors sat up until 1 o'clock in the morn- 
ing before they decided to accede to 
the demand. 



Eight-hour Movement— Continued, 

Tin; City Law Hepartment of Col- 
umbus, Ohio, has just discovered that 
all city einpl03 ees must be placed on 
an eight-hour work day basis in the 
future. It is probable that many 
employes will sue the city for over- 
time pay under this ruling. 

Thk members of the ;iheet Metal 
Workers' Union of Milwaukee, Wis., 
have been successful in securing the 
eight- hour day which they demanded 
on June 1st, and have been granted an 
increase of 10 per cent in wages. 

Tin: Smelter Mills at Florence, 
Colo,, have adopted the eight-hour 
day and no dlffi-rence exists there be- 
tween employers and employees. The 
men are being paid $2 for an eight- 
hour shift, the same wages as were 
paid for a twelve-hour shift. The 
eight-hour system has been adopted 
by the El Paso Reduction Company 
with the men working in the roasting 
room and barrel house, with a 10 per 
cent, increase in wages. The eight- 
hour system was inaugurated by the 
coal mines of the Colorado Fuel and 
Iron Company on the first of the 
month, and everyfh ing has worked 
(juite satisfactorily. 



Piracy. 

Wf have had several uccaslons ot lale lo write 
• rid publish articlt* con, rrtilng the un'mi 
met ho<] 1 resorted to by some manniactiirer* in 
wrongfully «p|>t opriatirg devi. «■■> of olheis and 
foisting uj,rjn the market g,,o>ls made in itnlt.i 
tion of other* and selling thr same M genuine 
irtie'es A caie In point has recently been 
!<r light to the attention ot the foiled Statu 
Circuit Court for the Southern Ilistricl of Niu 
York, in a suit brought by Mr* Saiah C Morrill, 
the successor in business of the late Mr. Lliarle. 
Morrill. 

The saw set* manufactured hy Mr Morrill 
have for many jr«r> past been well known tu the 
trade ami owing to the peifect manned of their 
con -trip no.- arid the excellence of the material 
employed, have well deserved the reputation 
which they have earned. One of Mr. .Morrill'! 
patent! expired some months ago nod the saw 
net manufactured under the aald patent, became 
common property, and several manufacturers 
proc-eded to miike nw sets on the same pattern 
covered by the expired patent. Tula of course 
they had the legal right to do and had they aold 
them openly without any device thereon or 
under their own mimes, Mrs Merrill would have 
had no legal nor oilier ground (or complaint. In 
order, however, to decehe the public and to 
make them believe that the good* manufactured 
by Ihem were genuine Morrill aaw sets some 01 
lhe*e manufacturer* at amped rn the saw sei 
itseir the words " Morrill I'attern Mo. 1 '* and 
packed the aaw seta In boxes of the Identic*! 
aize and make of Mra. Morrill's boats with 
practically the same inacrlption stencilled on the 
same, so that the purchasers w ho saw the boa en 
or the saw seta would naturally believe that they 
were buying the genuine aaw aeta. Mra, Morrill 
waa compelled to begin auit and we are glad to 
be able to report that Mr. Justice l.acombe 
Issued an injunction on I'ehruary 27th, UM,eu< 
joining the manufacture and sale of saw sets 
beating upon the same or upon any boxes or 
packages containing the Mir e the name Motrin 
or any colorab e imitation of her name, device or 
trade-mark . or from advertising or exposing 
for sale goods which Id any way or mannei 
would lead the purchasing public to believe that 
ihey were putchaaing genuine Mori ill saw a«U, 
We think that thin decision of Mr. Justice La- 
combe will have a good effect upon the hardware 
trade and congratulate Mra. Morrill upon her 
a cceas In putting a atop to this unfair compel. 



There were fifty- three labor strikes 
in England last year, involving 13,827 
work-people. The wages of 3*9,900 
persons were advanced an average of 
10 cents per week. During the first 
three months 133 strikes occurred, 
involving 23,253 persons ; loss of 
time, 503, joo labor days. 



THE CARPENTER. 



The Application of Geometrical Krln- 
clplea In handrail Construction. 



t. 



IIY MORRIS WILLIAMS, 




I'KOPOSK in these 
articles to explain the 
few geometrical prin- 
ciples which are abso- 
lutely necessary to an 
intelligent understanding of the 
science of handraillng, believing as 
we do that to propound certain meth- 
ods to obtain the face mould and 
bevels, while Ignoring the principles 
whereon such methods are founded, 
is worse than useless. 

There are hundreds of excellent 
mechanics in the country whose ex- 
tent of scientific knowledge is limited 
to a few examples of curved rails ; 
when facing any other example they 
are at a loss to know how to proceed, 
owing to their want of knowledge of 
the few geometrical problems neces- 
sary to meet the specific conditions of 
■uch examples. If properly posted in 
the knowledgeof these principles they 
would have in their possession the 
power to overcome all difficulties. 

In these days and especially in this 
country where the educational sys- 
tem in our public schools is consid- 
ered almost perfect, it seems inexcus- 
able in any mechanic to be ignorant 
of the theory of his trade ; and in view- 
ing the handrailer as standing at the 
very top of all branches in the build- 
ing trade, it becomes doubly inex- 
cusable in him not to strive to be 
we-*hy of his exalted craft. 




Hit;, t, 

We promise all our readers who 
will tollow us intelligently to lead 
them from the A , />*, C, to the most 
complex examples of handrail con- 
struction, and we urgently request, 
especially the younger members of 
our readers, not to leave a single line 
from the beginning to the end with- 
out knowing thoroughly the full 
meaning of the same. 

The science of handrailing is 
founded on that special branch oi 
geometry which is used to unfold 
sections of solids, primary the prism 
and cylinder. But before entering on 
this phase of this subject we will in this 
article confine our treatment to a few 
perspective views as object lessons. 

Fig. i Is a right-angle prism re- 



vealing a sectional cut made oblique 
to two of its sides at o, a, b, c, and 
square to the other two sides. 

Fig. 2 is a similar prism, but the 
sectional cut in this figure is oblique 
to its four sides. To have a practical 
knowledge of these sections we ad- 
vise the preparation of a piece of 
wood, say, \" -f- \" + j'° and a saw 
cut made through its sides, following 




Fig. 2. 

the lines marked in these figures. 
The end of the wood after the cut is 
made, will reveal the correct form of 
the section, and the angles of the 
outlines of the section will be the 
correct angles, which in handrail con- 
struction are known as the angles 
between the tangents and are made 
use of to square the joints. 




Q 



v J 



Figs. 3 and 4. 

Figs. 3 and 4 illustrate two cylin- 
ders. Fig. 3 revealing a sectional 
cut of the same nature as the one 
made through the prism shown in 
Fig. 2. It is oblique to the axis of 
the cylinder from all points in the 
circumference of the same. 

Fig. 4 shows a sectional cut oblique 
to the axis of the cylinder in one 
direction and is of the same nature as 
the cut made through the prism 
shown in Fig t. If a saw cut is made 
oblique through a turned spindle the 
section will reveal the form of an ellipse 
as is shown in the sections of Figs. 
3 and 4 and in hand-railing, the 
contour of such elliptical sections will 
form the face moid. 

Fig 5 is introduced to Illustrate the 
co-ordinate planes and their line of 
Intersection, usually defined as the 
ground line, and also, the line XY. 
In this figure we have three different 
planes, a. b, c, 0, tlie horizontal ; b b' 
C c, the vertical ; and the dotted lines 



b' a and Co, forming the oblique shown in I ; ig, 7, which is another re- 
plane. The ground line or the X Y is production of the tame figure with the 
shown intersecting the vertical, and addition of a complete curved handrail 
the horizontal planes, which are known winding in the oblique plane and con- 
as the co ordinate planes. t 

Fig. 6 is similar to Fig. 5 with an 
addition of a quarter circle inscribed 




Fir, 5. 



on the horizontal plane, and an equiva- 
lent portion of an ellipse drawn on 
the oblique plane. 

By assuming the quarter circle to be 



netting to a newel on a landing of a 
stairway. 

We trust and hope that the reader 
through the means of these perspective 




Fig 

the plan of a centre line of a hand- 
rail, the portion of the ellipse standing 
right above It will be the center line 
of the curved rail when in position on 
the oblique plane 0, a, b\ 



figures, will have a clear view of the 
utility of making use of unfolding 




Fig 7, 

The relation of this cou pound figure 



sections of solids in handrail 1 
tlon. 

In our next article we will explain 
the most simple method of unfolding 
these sections geometrically, and pro- 
duce a face mold and bevels, for the 



to handrail construction is clearly rail shown In Fig. 7. 



THE CARPENTER. 



London Letter. 



BY thomas REKCR. 



II 



RO. CHANDLER, the cen- 
tral .secretary of the Amal- 
gamated Society o r Car- 
per.tfs and Joiners is o 1 " 
the opinion that the most 
conclusive evidence of the efficacy 
of a trade union la the extent to 
which it is able to improve the 
material welfare of its members. 
Judged by thin standard the efficacy 
of his own society is beyond all doubt. 
During 1898 the wages of its llritish 
members were increased in nn fewer 
than 124 districts, some of these dis- 
tricts being as wide as Liverpool and 
the vicinity. In thirty MTCD instances 
the increase in wages was coupled with 
a decrease in hours The wage in- 
creases varied from Jit. *5 down to six 
cents per week, the latter figures being 
only reached in a couple of cases. The 
average increase was about fifty cents 
per week. 



Great Yarmouth and St. Alban's 
were the towns where the biggest 
decreases in hours were achieved, each 
having eight and oiie-half hours per 
I week knotted ofl the winter working 
t week. Both of these towns now work 
' only forty- eight hours per week in 
f winter and fifty -six and one- half in 
^ summer. 

Not a single set hack in wages is to 
be announced for the whole of iSyS, 
and only two towns, Blackburn in 
England and Grangemouth in Scot- 
land, were compelled to increase their 
winter working hours— the former, 
one hour per week, and the latter, 
three hours. 

Small wonder is it that such «. 
strenuous society ended the year with 
56,634 members in 744 branches, and 
with a cash balnnce of $863,560. 

These figures show a mt Increase for 
the year of nice branches 3.577 mem- 
bers and C.1S2, 020. Never before has 
the union saved so much cash In one 
year, although 1890, 1896 and 1897 
were rather more fruitlul in new 
members. 

During the thirty-nine years of the 
union's vigorous existence it has paid 
to its members in out-of-work pay, 

in superannuation, $568 .S30; in funeral 
grants, 3416,975; in accident insurance, 
$222,350; in tool insurance, 5221,250 
and in general trade protective sup- 
port, $884,605. Besides these huge 
sums the A. S. C. J. has paid away 
under special circumstances in grants 
to its own members or other trade 
unions $259,430. 

Such of the above benefits as are 
of the nature of insurance against 
calculable risks, (tool, sickness, 
funeral and superannuation insur- 
ance,) increase year by year as the 
membership grows and the area of pro- 
:tion expands. The unemployed pay 
varies tremendously. The two heaviest 
years in this section of benefit, taking 
Into account the membership of the 
society at the time, were 1879 and 1886, 
in which years the benefit amounted to 
$8 per member. The largest total in 



this benefit ever paid In one year was 
in iN'U.->-" c ..4- , 5. an average of $5 
per head, of that year's membership. 
General trade benefit, co%-ering as it 
does strike and lock out pay, also 
greatly fluctuates. The relatively 
WOint year was 1877 when it worked 
out at $375 per member; iNui and 
180,3 were the next worst years, over 
seventy live thousand dollars going 
in each twelve months 

At the end of [86o, when the A. S. 
C.J had completed its first year it 
bad a roll of only twenty branches 
and 618 m<tttber8. Since then it has 
gone on increasing year by year, 
making its biggest jump in 189Q when 
it added 5.023 members in one year. 
Very slight backwashes occurred in 
'7'. 7 s . ,s " ami '88, but the decreases 
were only of a few hundred members. 
There are [,68fi members of the A. S. 
C .1 in the I "nited States and Canada ; 
530 in South Africa (mainly in 
Johannesburg), and 1,099 in Australia 
and New Zealand. 

Coming to current news the most 
pregnant fact is the relation of the 
Carpenters and Joiners Unions to the 
proposed General Federation of 
Trade Unions AH unions are ballot- 
ing upon the question of affiliation. 
The A. S C J. completed its vote in 
April. Only t6 133 members took 
the trouble to vote (thus leaving a 
huge tota 1 of over 40.000 indifierent- 
ists), and the proposal was negatived 
by a plurality of 3,871. This is the 
third scheme that members of this 
union have rejected, although in 
October a majority of some thousands 
riron oti need in favor of the idea of 
national trades federation. 

The action of the Master Builders' 
Association in sending out a circular, 
in connection with the plasterer's 
lock-oat, to all the unions in tht 
building trades, asking them for a 
pledge to abstain from supporting the 
plasterers, has been rightly repro- 
bated on all sides. The fact is that 
the employers have found the lock- 
out a failure. The plasterers have 
obtained work elsevi here in large 
numbers and those who are still out 
are no excessive burden to their 
union. With regard to the foolish 
circular all the unions written to 
have refused to give the required 
assurance and in return the employers 
threaten a general lock-out of all 
branches of the trade. The outlook 
is not in the least feared by the 
unions. 

Amongst small recent local trade 
disputes are the following: At 
Grimsby, eighty six carpenters and 
joiners struck for five days for an 
advance of 1 cent per hour (from 15 
to 16 cents). The advance was con- 
ceded. 

At Merthyr Tydvil, in Wales, sixty- 
two carpenters have concluded a 
seventeen days' strike advanta- 
geously. Wages have b?en advanced 
from 15 to id cents per hour and the 
working week has been reduced from 
fifty four to fifty-three hours in sum- 
mer and from fifty and one halt to 
forty eight hours in winter. The 
Arbroath (Scotland) unionists have 
also gained, after a nine days' strike, 



an advance from 15 to 16 cents per 
hour. The carpenters of Bishop 
Auckland, a northern town, alter 
being on strike since lost June have 
received 1 cent per hour rise and a 
new code of working rules. 

The Manchester carpenters and 
joiners, to the number of 3,500, have 
gained an increase from 18 to i>> 
cents per hour. This means an 
increase of about 50 cents pet week 
per man, exclusive of any overtime. 
In Accrington, Altrincham, Ashton 
under Lyne, Bnrnsley, Bat row in- 
Kurness, Sheffield, Stockport, Wigati, 
Burton -on -Trent, Glossop, the Pot- 
teries, and many other places during 
the last month wages have been 
advanced, usually 1 cent per hour, 
and between four and five thousand 
carpenters and joiners participated in 
this upward movement. In three of 
the above districts decreased hours 
are also to becreditt l to the men's 
agitation. 

The strike at Kdinburgh, Scotland, 
which began in April rjjth, for an 
advance from 18 to 19 cents per hour 
and other benefits, is still unsettled ; 
1,320 men are aflected. 

Should the master builders carry 
out their threat to inaugurate a gen- 
eral retaliatory lock out throngh the 
building trade it will probably start 
with a lock out of 25 per cent, of 
their employees after the end of this 
week. 



What the United Brotherhood M u 
Done. 



The Law and the Laborer. 



The people who have spasms ovrr 
the passage of the Moore eight hour 
law are respectfully referred to the 
action of a similar law in Utah, which 
is eminently successful and has not 
operated to impose a hardship upon 
either the mine operator or employes. 
These restrictive laws have been 
placed in operation through the in 11 11 
ence of organized labor, in almost 
every locality throughout the United 
States and have been beneficial te> 
both employer and employed. The', 
give employment to 25 per cent, more 
men than under the ten -hour system, 
and, no matter hew the question of 
wages adjusts itself, the eight- hour 
system is certainly consistent with 
conditions existing in every part of 
the world. Eight hours for labor, 
eight hours for recreation and eight 
hours for sleep is seemingly a correct 
and sensible division of time; and 
since the United States has become a 
nation of hired men, there is every 
reason why the law should regulate 
these matters. 

From the stand -point of utility most 
of the large mining companies have- 
adopted the eight-hour system long 
since. 

In Montana the same practice is in 
vogue in all mines employing over 
fifteen men and operates beneficially. 
This exception was made in the 
interest of the small leasers. 

In the social system every man un- 
employed Is a threat, either to his 
fellow workmen or to society, and a 
law that is framed for the purpose of 
taking up 25 per cent, more labor is 
beneficial alike to employer, employee 
and aoci*ty at large. 

—Ltadville Miner. 



Tin- United »"dher!iood or C.irprtUw and 

Joiners ..f Anient" HTM ' tded l« Cott»eOlloa 

bt Cttieapeo. Angtial I- *t " aedoalj 

iwrlea local nolooaoml 8,1 v: mi ifccn Mo» bj 
>rT<-iit«'cii v.-t™. ii bMtrrowi in numbei t> 1. tti 

t'nlnns in -liaiciti. s, ami hasi.wr I ..KFlenri ed 

member* 11 leurgaoleed In protest the G*tvn, 
ler Trade from the e*i tool low piiie* nod t. I* 

w ilk ; it* aim I* In rm «M I " Mffctl Mttdetj 

of *ku; and better w«kc- ; i<> t. r«taU(«h «n 
Apprentice syst- in. and lo »"i and a*atrt Uh 
merebera iiv mutual protection nn.ii" neeirfeai 

mrMi-; II pay* a Wife l-uin-ml Benefit ol f-..ru 

j$5 ! o J", a M' mher* Pnneral Benefit, f 1 ■ • • ic 
poo-, and • WnabURy Rraaflt, fi"": ifW It 

thine Cleiicral Hem lit*. |mi*»» h*»» tw »i e t . 

prnii<-.| the pant tern, yearn, .1" 1 |*(>*,~lei*Jnc< I he. 
tear 1W3, while f>«as Ml m ie ererr spent It thai 
pennl * ir Mck Bfnrflte by Ibe local t Bloat 
Thin- fully fioeaod a uonrtet Willi naot 1 ■- -i. 
tareeapsejded (bf hem rob nl and eharttal It par. 

po-es. Sin h an Of ganlXAitOn i- w> f t h t he , 
tion of evil y CO I pent el I lie l^rnlhrrhoc.l 1, 

iKi h frotcctlee Trade t'nton a* will a* a 

Benevolent So, Irty II I kM retard Hie iv»nr. is 
hundred ol clue-, n .1 place I latlly Five ami a 

iinii Million Dotlata more wane- annually is 

Ihe p»> fcCtaof the Cut; ent» in ihi i- iine< Ji 

reduced i»e h' nrs • ( m N hottraadarhi 

liV, clti'-*, ttti'l M hniir« « day in fiiur hn ■ 

d:eti and twenty-ate iinr». not to .p-nk ol 

many til ies whuli Ii iv e«n«i li.heil the H and J 

hour Kyetem OS Halnedaya. •>>' IhW menu 
15130 mote men knee icuneii employment. 
This i- Hie u-s,,)! ni iii. miinh Drganiati 
Hmu Ami eat eery lew Myitis bate "cc-mred. 

ami »ery htile HUMUty ha- beetl -jw lit o«i >tnke« 

hy tint tndviy u la aol h -eciet oatb>t)ouad 
orKnii""'" "■ A" owinpeteol Carpenien m* 
eligible ta j iln. and tM« card lean itteUal .n to 

yoiiHHtin intelligent rierh/tut to aend ! n 11 'it 

application lor mamberahtp la Ibe Carpenter) 

ftlHV HI fOIH City. H I* " li'H'irh ill Iht 
Brotherhood, it) i!n« are -mull iii r<-.'njiari\ni> 
with the henet.iv ntn! it U to your intei-»t to 
join i hi- growi ii)( and iiuvrerTul body, 

Kules Regarding Apprentices. 



At th- Detroit Cr.nven Hun ol lh" rr ilei! V.tmK 
e-hood of Carpentpre and Joinrm ol Attier ol 
hi Id Anoint ft- II, li*", iii following rule* ui •, ■:>. 
tion to aj.prettticet Mwreapproecd and i tie tiocal 
UttlOna are tirife.l |p .ecii-e t>n ■•• en:, i e- ier t 

lf*^»eai. The rejiid inrl'ii of im»k;l - ! uml in- 
rom|*tent men in (he mrjie-iier |radl hM h 
ol l«te year*, a very deprcaatafl anil injnrii m 

effect iipoa thr mechanid In lha beunnaaa, and 
has a tentieocv to deajradc I be atandaid of tfeJU 
anil to ntve no encouranemeflt to ynun; men "o 
tieeot'i" B;.j)r»-rtice* niiil to nni'lei the lra.it 
Ihoeongfely; therefore, in the beat int i»«ti ol 
the rran, we ('ec'.arc ourael»e« in favor of the fol- 
lowing rules: 

SkiT'on I The indent ■■ r"<^ ol »j>prentire« It 
the Ih-m me»n» r^lcuinleil to (five lhat efli' :• iict 
wllieh il is riesltfelije n c:it;^-niei ttlonid l< anem 
andaKo to wive ttie nerea^urr ^uarantT to Itic 
employer e that amne return will l,e trade tothem 
for a proper etfnrt to inrii out romi>et*nt arofw 

men; therefore, era direct that all Local fmoni 

under oui jtiriwtirtion "-hall use every paaaihli 
means, wherever practical, lo introduce the «>•► 
tern of indenturing apprenticaa, 

SwC. 1 Any boy or p. r»r>n hereafl-r engUK'Sl 
himself to learn the tia le of carpentry, shall Iw 
required to aerve a regular «v>|.renl n-e.hi| 
four consecutive years, and ahall not lie i orsid 
ered a journeyman iiiilc-« he has compiled with 
thia rule, and is twenty ..ne ye h rs cl age at th* 
completion of his apj.rentieei.hip. 

Shc. 3. All hoya enlering Ihe carjenter Its. If 
with Ihe Inlention ol learnitii; thr business s!,»ll 
I* held by agree™, nt n, denture or wriilen < . a- 
tiB'l fur a term ol fniir years:. 

Skc t. When a !>oy shall have rnntraclrd witb 
an employer lo serve a certain term of years hf 
ahall, on no pretense whativer, leave aaiil <-m. 
ployer and contrnrl with another, without the 
full and fn e conaent of aaid first eeapSoyar, 
unless there U jnat cause or that such chant: i II 
made in coriaei t iience of the death or relinquia&i 
mentor business hy the first employ et ; ens up- 
prentice so lenvltig; shall not be perm it lid to 
work under the jurisdiction of any IxK'al rtiioB 
in o-ir Srotherhood. hut ahull he required to re- 
turn to hta employer and aerve out his apprra 
ticeahip. 

Sp.c. 5. It ia enjoined upon each Local mine 
to innke regulations limiting the number o! ap- 
prentices to be employed in eneh abop or mill " 
one for auch number of journeymen as maf 
ieem to them just; and all Hnlona are recom- 
mended to admit lo memterahip a pp re ntlcel In 
thelaat year of their eppren ticeahip. to the rod 
that, upon the expiration of their ttrma of ap- 
prenticeship they may become acquainted wit" 
the workings of the Union, and be better fitted 
to appreciate Ita privileges end obligations upon 
[full. 



THE CARPENTER. 



11 



Proceeding* of the General Executive 
Board. 



AKIl 10, IHW.— The O, K. B. met at B o'clock 
A M. All the members were preaent. 

Appeal. Union 5J, H jston, MlM., In J. Jones 
claim, I»eclsi-,n ol <'.. S.-T. sustained. 

Appeal, Union "JI7. Brooklyn, N. Y , to r.eu- 
erst Convention fioin 'he decision of 1>. C, 
C i ! referred to next Convention. 

Ainirnl of I). C, t'.slveston, Tex , W, (WcUion 
of O. S.-T. »e Clearance Caul, sustained . 

Decision of <'., .S.-T. io claims for funeral hene. 
fitanf C. Buckley .S; I,. McKenna, kit. I.ouis, Mo , 
sii>laitieil. 

Appeal of K. J. Hindlav, I'uion 111), Man- 
chester , H, II., COVaridefVll aud decision oj Jan- 
uary I Wh sustained. 

Appeal ol J. Sleinhach // at i'S. Chicago, D. C„ 
sustained, but lin> s should he reduced to ten 
dollars in each case. 

Appeal U. Carlson r' Chicago, D C. Appeal 
tint within limit prescribed by »e.\ 80 of Cotuttt* 
t ii t tori itfi'l consequently dismissed. 

Ai'Kii Hill. Appe.d [futon 4.1. Kensingt in, 
III , :'s. decision of Chicago. I). C. tf three mrm- 
heia Union fcil finrd, not sustained, as Sec. Ml of 
Constitution Iihs mtt la-en complied Willi in 
liliu.; cony of appeal heti.re the il. C. See diet - 
ion re Csilson i r, Chicago, C, 

Auilit of hooks begun and occupird remainder 
of Session. 

Appeal of J Ramming r«. a n sion of 6. f, 
Action of <:. v. sustained | On Appeal w. Chi- 

CSgO, 1) CO 

Appeal, I'nion DM, New ark, N. J. vs. (i. S.-T. 
Action of G. S.-T. sustained in his decision to 
enforce the provisions ol the law. U. I', in- 
structed IotWI Union r*«! and find what would 
be necessary to aid I'uion ItOo, and to repntl im- 
mediately to c ,. I, H. 

Aran. I'.'th.— Appeal. I'niuu l&, I'lic.i, N. V. m 

decision .if O. P, Anion deferred until Union 

li. Ihl ws thai it hail complied with Sec. Ml i>f 
Constitution. 

Appeal, t'nion V7, Toronto »'.. decision of C. S - 
T. to extend charge of «."> initiation fee to May I, 
1«!U. Union -T wants il extended to May I. I'.iii). 
K.ijuest refused. 

D.C of I'hiladelphia appointed a Committee 
to visit O.K.B. at their meeting, Devided tttat 
Commit ee be heard but that requests by the 

Committee should be placed before the Board la 

writing. 

Appeal, P. Kerr If. decision of Cleveland loii- 
venlidti. dismissed. Sec 71 of Constitution coveis 
groiiml fully and Ihe law must !»• carried out. 

Report of (i. P. on various matters in h.s 
hunda for investigation and settlement, tead and 
carefully eaammed by h . V 

Decision of I'.. 1' ask in,; t'nion i,' ., New York, 
to return at once the lJM>Nt> death benefit pnttl 
in claim of J. HimebbUt, proved invnlul. wan abs- 
tained by il K 11. 

liei ision ol G, 1*. asking Union :?"«. New York, 
to telurn at once the pn mi in cbum i.ealli bene- 
bt nl V. Hunf. proved invalid, was sustained by 
G. K. B. 

Il.iauce of Session taken up in discussing Hint 
part of G I' '* report lelnting to trouble eilating 
between the 1'. II. ami the New Vork City car- 
penters. 

Al'MIl IliTH. AVsuc. e-Moiiof I nioii Ht", I.ynn. 
Mass . it was decidid to S'-mi a repre>enlative to 
New Knjtlaml StMea to cuiintet act the work 
done by the repi eseniatives of the secession 
movement. 

Appeal, of It. Meyer, I nion tt, San l-'rancinco, 
: s. i nion 2! sustained, and Unii n 'ZL lusltucted 
to pay sick, benefit as J. B. Anders, the benefi- 
ciary had not loat tils beiieliton accuuutof work- 
inK outside of the jurisdiction of Uttton 

A> controversy belwerii New York [>, C. and 
Hatavia ami N. Y. Wood Working Co l iiioiia of 
N, V. should handle the product m said tit ill, no 
information furnished to change fomier ileci- 

■loa of (.. tt. n. 

A'e controversy V, H. M, N. V. city carpenters, 
the settlement is left in the bands of the O. P, 
and G. S.-T, 

Appeal, of H. C. ruion, of New Yoik, to 
initiate hi i ight of applitation dismissed. Sec 
71 of Ct Slit Hon must he sustained. 

Application, for sanction of strike of If nion 7H, 
Troy, N. V., appioved, financial eld to be 
decided on after teport of deputy to be appointed 
had lieeo receiveil. 

Balauce of ae.Hsion taken up in reading notices 
of tiade-inovemenls, and applicatioua lor assla^ 
lance from dtlTt rent parts ol the country. 

Apati. ItTH, Communications were lead per- 
tniniDg to the refusal of Union MA, of New Yolk, 
to comply with the law in regard to being rcp- 
r, aemed In the D. C. of the tiorouL/h of Bronx. 
G. K. B decides that Union 4M must send dele- 
gates to the Council of the Borough of Bronx aa 
Sec. 17a of the Constitution requires it. 

Request to sustain demand made by D. C, 
Pittsburg fur half, holiday on Saturday and main- 
taining nine-hour day during rest of week not 
agreed to. Pi'tshurg District should fitat exact 
the eight-hour day. financial aid to be decided 
later. 

Nine-hour day asked for b J Union Stli, Tor ring 
ton, Conn. Union advise* to atand firm for their 
of houra. 



Request for financial aid (rom Unions 177 and 
f)li. Springfield, Mass, Financial aid not deemed 
necessary, and they should firat secure the eight- 
hour day. 

Application, for financial aid. Union 994, 
Pecksville. Pa., refused. Sec. ol Constitution 
makes it impossible. Trust the I'nion will suc- 
ceed without aid. 

AV R.J. Mi. ley in dissbility claim, former de- 
cislonof Q K. H. sustained. 

Financial aid for Union 4J, New Rochelle. 
granted to Inaugurate eight-hour day. Report 
from lieputy to be basis for aid. Movement 
sanctioned by 0. K. B. 

Financial aid for demand for eight-hour day 
and increase in wages, Union, Scranton, 
p umlsed after report frutii Deputy. Movem—it 
approved by G. K. 11. 

Application for *.i(J0 from Union Mt), Passaic, 
N. J,, laid over, data incomplete. 

Financial aid promised if necessary to 1». C. 
ol Chicago, (or movement for new wage scale 
and for half holiday an S tturday. Deputy to he 
appointed if necessary by G. S -t. 

Aiil for nine-hour day , Union l(S, Wilkesbarre, 
Pa , promised. Report from Deputy to be basis 
for aid. 

At i for Unions In Jersey City nmi Hoboken 
promised, aaiuei.sin Union it ol New Rochelle. 

Application from li. C. of Syracuse, N. Y„ lor 
hnancial n.ssistance. G. K, B rtnects attention 
to Sec. of Cons:ituiion pages jo, and 'J'.', and 
npiH-al not favured. 

Aid to Union tW, y uiticy, III . promised, same 
as Union IV, of New Rochelle. 

A ii plication for aid from Unifjn Amsterdam, 
N. Y., not being complete, action was deferred. 

Report from Sec. I». C , Cleveland. Refeired 
to 0, S.-T. to procure furl her in formation. 

Aid for Union U£l, Belleville, 111., promised, 
same as I'uion 4^ 

Sanction and financial aid o I'nion lti7, Kliia- 
beth, N, J,, held over u til later. Most con- 
tractors have signed agreement. 

BUppOtt in the demand of Union BS, Perth 
Atnhoy, deemed unadvised ; reccimmetub d to 
niodily demand, action deferred. 

Action on application of Unlor Ml, Racine. 
Wis., deferred for furthei in formation . 

Ai ktL I it it. Additional Report by the G. P. 
on matters referred to him and O. S.-T. at the 
January meeting. 

First. Plan lor securing funds for better or- 
ganisation ot Hie trade Deferred for consulta- 
tion with G. K. B. 

Second. Warrant for arrest of H. C Schneider 
obtained. Aition rd 0, P. and G. S.-T, approved 
ami ordered to proceed w th ttrosecution. 

Application, If, C. ol Fhiladelphia for reduc- 
tion of Initiation fee to $1 HI D. C. refened to 
G. S.-T. 

yuartetly audit was taken up during the lat- 
ter part ol the session. 

Discussion of pli-ns for puttin" organirera in 
the field in all se< lions of the Country looR up 
t. a la nee of session. 

Ai'RK. 17Tit — App'. it-on for'irgauiser.Cnii n 
1-7, 'franlts, Neb., 1). C. Of Milwaukee and Sta- 
pleton, S. t- d, P. and G. S T. instructed to 
appoint otganizera. A sum not to exceed $'>,CH*1 
to he set n-ide lor organizers, all o\ er t he country. 

Applications New York H. C. >r Staitbullder* 
to be lakiti into Hie U. B. not sustained, 
information asked lor not having been furnished 
as to Sec. 1 of proposed agieement, which 
applies to conditions on which mcnbi rs will be 
taken into the D. B. 

Action of G. V andG. S.-T, in taking offices ia 
l.lpplncotl Building endorsed. 

Appeal, Mary Maus claim taken from last 
meeting, the deci ijn ot G, S.-T. disapproving 
claim not su-tained. 

Repxrt tr Schneider, Schneider could not be 
found at present. G. K. B accepted the report aa 
progress. 

Union 1. - asked to prefer charges against 
Schneider, Sec. b-l and HH of Cunstiuitlon, nntl 
eapel him in accoidatice with last parfgraph ol 
Sec. 170. 

Fitzgerald m. Chicago, D C, his appeal not 
sustained. 

Balance of session taken up with quarterly 
Audit. 

Aran- IKrw, — Audit of books was taken upand 

concluded. 

an mm aa v kok janhauv. kr. roaxv amd 

MSHCU, 1W.M. 

Balance on hand, Jan. 1st |M|4M :7 

Receipts : 

January "!,6Xi tin 

Kebruary il.aS!) fn 

March . 7.1 'Jo 80 

f4l),i:il 70 

ttxpeuses 

January . p>,4tKi 10 

February tfitt ti 

March 0,315 XI 

J1S 4HI ffj 

Balance on hand April 1, \-w |£!,159 K» 

Rt N, Y. D. C. and st sir builders of New York, 
letter received dated Ap il lthh. G. S.-T. In- 
structed to submit matter by mail toll! members 
of the Board for a vote, two members having 



Also, communication from nrooklyn D C to 
enforce trade rules, May 1st. to be submitted to 
Hoard by mall. 
Adjourned to meet July 1", |ft0fr, 

J R. Mtt.Lt*, 
Attest : Sec. G. F. tt. 

P J. McGtTittK, 

(Tenrral Srr.- Vtfas 



Demands of American Federation of 
Labor. 



r. Compulsory education, 

2. Direct legislation through the 
Initiative and referendum. 

3. A legal workday of not more 
than eight hours. 

4. Sanitary inspection of workshop, 
mine and home. 

5. Liability of employers for Injury 
to health, body and life. 

6. The abolition of the contract 
system in all public work. 

7. The abolition of the sweating 
system . 

8. The municipal ownership of 
street cars, water works and gas and 
electric plants for public distribution 
of light, heat and power. 

9. The nationalization of telegraph, 
telephone, railroads and mines. 

10. The abolition of the monopoly 
system of land holding, and substi- 
tuting therefor a title of occupancy 
and use only. 

tt. Repeal ail conspiracy and penal 
laws affecting seamen and other 
workmen incorporated in the Federal 
and state laws of the United States. 

12. The abolition of the monopoly 
privilege of Issuing money and sub- 
stituting therefor a system of direct 
issuance to and by the people. 



English Pti'ck. 



Maybe It was at Isandula, with 
Lord Chelmsford's army, or It may 
have been elsewhere in Africa, but. 
at any rate, during the Zulu War, 
says Collier's Weekly, after an engage- 
ment in which the British troops were 
defeated by Cetewayo's black warriors, 
aud were compelled to fly for their 
lives, an English cavalryman, whose 
scrnggy little pony limped from an 
assegai slash, detached himself from 
the retreat and galloped back upon 
the charging Zulus. A glance over 
his shoulder bad shown him a dis- 
mounted comrade, stumbling pain- 
fully along trying to jam some cart- 
ridges into his clogged revolver. 
When the trooper's pony trotted up 
the Zulus were almost upon the two 
soldiers; fortunately they had dis- 
carded their spears and were mishand- 
ling captured carbines. Now, in a 
melodrama, or In a realistic novel edi- 
fying to schoolgirls, the language of 
these two gallant soldiers, one to the 
other, there amid the squealing Zulu 
bullets, would have been noble, lofty, 
inspiring and godlike. This is what 
they really said : 

" Get out o' this, Bill, ye bloomin' 
ijtt — the black beggars'll skewer 
you 1" gasped the wounded man. 

li You cllmk up on this 'orse or I'll 
punch your d— n head off ! " was the 
reply from the trooper. 

And It is delightful to be able to 
say that he did climb up, and they 
both escaped from the ' ' black beg- 
gars, "and the trooper got the Vic- 




(/uffi«si *r»aVf this kradcosi ten 



a lin*.) 



Uarroje I SB, Toprha, Kanh. 

w hrkbas, It has pleased Almighty God, the 
Builder of t)iisnreat ' niverse, to remoff from 
our midst if 1 W11 liam Hi Tutmp. 

Whkreas, The members of 1 .11. a I I'nion No. 
I .'.H feel the loss of a faithful Htother and an 
earnest promoter ol unionism, therefore be It 

Jttsalved, That we drape our charter /or thirty 
days, and express our since-e sympathy to the 
bereaved famiiy of our deceased bi other. Also 
be it 

A'esoli'rd, That a copy of these resolutions be 
Spread on the minutes of mir mertinj, that a 
copy be presented to the family, and that they 
be sent for pu iilicatlou 111 the official paper. 
M, J 3A.Sl.Bjt, 



1 



S. B. Wkaver. 



Olltoa 4JHi, Passaic, N. J. 
WftF.nr as, It has plensed the Almighty God in 
I lis infinite wisdom, to remove from our Brother- 
hood, our eiteeme 1 Brother, I.isroso Van 
WtMKi.S, who departed ihts life May 5, Km 
Therefore, 

He it Kesolvfd, That we drape our Charier for 
Thirty days, and that we express our sympathy 
to the bereaved family of our decea-ed Brother, 
Also be it 

Kesn'vd, That a copy of these resolutions be 
spread on Lhr minute of our meeting, also a copy 
be presented to the family, also a copy h* pub- 
lished in our oirici.il Journal, The CaitrENTea, 
also a copy be published in a local paper, 
J; ill pa Qi 

Commit!, e. 



Jiiiin Qf \ [ii.Asrij, -I 
H W. BotUNK, L 1 
D. J. MOKatsoN J 



UHtOM fx MlKBKAPoi.ia, Mlrrjr, 
W11ERF.AS, It has pleased the Master Builder 
of the cm verse to remove from our midst our 
late respected Brother Anorrw ChriSTbnson, 
therefore be it 

A'rsoined, That the blathers of h. V. No. 7, 
of Minneapolis, mourn the loss of Brother 
Andrew Cursstknson, and extend its sym- 
pathy to the bereaved widow and children in 
their hour of affliction, and we truit that the 
severity of the blow may be mitigated by the 
remembrance that we will all meet again In the 
Celestial Home above, and be it further 

A'rtolved, That our charter be draped for thirty 
days, and that these resolutions be spread upon 
the minutes, a copy presented to the widow and 
children, and al»o published in our official 
organ, TMK Cartf-NTKR, 

THOS. SBTNAN, 

Committee. 



TH03. SKTN AN, J 
JOHN - WALQL'IST, L 
CHAS SBTTOAST.J 



WhkrFaS. It has pleased Almighty God to call 
away I rum earth the wife of our Brother, Gear. 
KtJuMOH. Tlierefore.be it 

Resolved, that we, members of Carpenters 
I'uion No. 7, of Mm neapolis, lender our sincere 
sympathy to the bereaved husband and cull- 
dren. And be it further 

Resulted, That a copy of these resolutions be 
presented to the husband, ami al-o published in 
our official paper, Tuk Caki-rnter. 
Signed. 

THOMAS BRTNAN, 
JfiHN WALylJIST, 
C1IAIU.H.* SiKTTfl AST. 



Mittte, 



The consumption of beer per head 
of population is as follows : Bavaria, 
55 gallons ; German Umpire, 25 gal- 
lons ; Belgium, 44 gallons; United 
Kingdom, 31 ; Western Australia, 25 ; 
Denmark, 20 ; Switzerland, 14 ; the 
United States, Austria, Queensland 
Victoria, 12 gallons; Sweden, 9 gal- 
lons. 

J* 

We have been reliably informed 
that the trade on Lane's steel jack 
has been steadily increasing and it is 
now generally recognized as standard. 
The new size known as No. o, we are 
told is available for a great amount of 
light work. It can be sold at such a 
price that it is believed it will find a 
large sale where previously cheap 
wooden affairs have been used or no 
jack at all. All sizes are now also 
oftexed galvanized. The makers are 
Lane Brothers Company, Poughkeep- 
sie, N. Y, Advertisement in another 
column. 



10 



THE CARPENTER. 



London Letter. 




BV THOMAS RFF.CK. 




conclusive 




RO. CHANDLER, the gen- 
eral .secretary of the Amal- 
gamated Society o r Car- 
penters and Joiners is of 
the opinion that the most 
evidence of the etlicacy 
of a tiarle union la the extent to 
which it is able to improve the 
material welfare of its members. 
Judged by this standard the efficacy 
of his own society is beyond all doubt 
During iS<>S the wages of its British 
members were increased in no fewer 
than 124 districts, some- of these dis- 
tricts being as wide as Liverpool and 
the vicinity. In thirty seven instances 
the increase in wages was coupled with 
a decrease In hours. The wage in- 
creases varied from $115 down to six 
cents per week, the latter figures being 
only reached in a couple of cases. The 
average increase was about fifty cents 
per week. 

Great Yarmouth and St. Alban's 
were the towns where the biggest 
decreases In hours were achieved, each 
having eight and ode-half hours per 
week knocked oft" the winter working 
week. Both of these towns now work 
only forty-eight hours per week in 
winter and fifty-six and one half in 
summer. 

Not a single set back in wages is to 
be announced for the whole of 1898, 
and only two towns, Biackburn in 
England and Grangemouth in Scot- 
land, were compelled to increase their 
winter working hours -the former, 
one hour per week, and the latter, 
three hours. 

Small wonder is it that such a 
strenuous society ended the year with 
5^,634 members in 7.1. 4 branches, and 
with a cash balance of $863,560. 
These figures show a net increase for 
the year of nine branches 3.577 mem- 
bers and $182,020. Never before has 
the union saved so much cash In one 
year, although 1890, 1896 and 1897 
were rather more fruitful in new 
members. 

During the thirty-nine years of the 
union's vigorous existence it has paid 
to its members in out-of-work pay, 
*i> 799.355; in sick pay, $2, 314.^0; 
in superannuation, $568 830; in funeral 
grants, $4 16,975; In accident insurance, 
$222,350; in tool insurance, $221,250 
and in general trade protective sup- 
port, 1884*60$. Besides these huge 
sums the A, S.C.J, has paid away 
under special rcumstances in grants 
to its own members or othr trade 
unions $259,430. 

Such of the above benefits as are 
of the nature of insurance against 
calculable risks, (tool, sickness, 
funeral and superannuation insur- 
ance,) increase year by year as the 
membership grows and the area of pro- 
action expands. The unemployed pay 
varies tremendously. The two heaviest 
years in this section of benefit, taking 
into account the membership of the 
societyat the time, were 1879 and 1886, 
in which years the benefit amounted to 



this benefit ever paid in one year was 
in is i) $205,435, an average of $5 
per head, of that year's membership. 
General trade benefit, covering as it 
dues strike and lock out pay, also 
greatly fluctuates. The relatively 
worst year was 1877 wnt ' n it worked 
out at S3 75 per memher; 1891 and 
1893 were the next worst years, over 
seventy-five thousand dollars going 
in each twelve months. 

At the end of [86o, when the A. S. 
C.J. had completed its first year it 
had a roll of only twenty branches 
and 618 m. tubers. Since then it has 
gone on increasing year by year, 
making its biggest jump in 1890, when 
it added 5.023 members in one year. 
Very slight backwashes occurred in 
;r, '78, "86 and 'SS, but the decreases 
were only of a few hundred ni embers. 
There are [,686 members of the A. S. 
C J in the United States and Canada ; 
530 in South Africa (mainly in 
Johannesburg), and 1,01)9 in Australia 
and New Zealand, 

Coming to current news the most 
pregnant fact is the relation of the 
Carpenters and Joiners Unions to the 
proposed Ueneral Federation of 
Trade Unions. All unions are ballot- 
ing upon the question of affiliation. 
The A. S C.J. completed its vote in 
April. Only 16 1 33 members took 
the trouble to vote (thus leaving a 
huge total of over 40.000 indifierent- 
itfts), and the proposal was negatived 
by a plurality of 3,871, This is the 
third scheme that members of this 
union have rejected, although in 
October a majority of some thousands 
pronounced in favor of the idea of 
national trades federation. 

The action of the Master Builders' 
Association in sending out a circular, 
in connection with the plasterer's 
lock-out. to all the iiniotW in the 
building trades, asking them for a 
pledge to abstain from supporting the 
plasterers, has been rightly repro- 
bated on all sides. The fact is that 
the employers have found the lock- 
out a failure. The plasterers have 
obtained work elsewhere in large 
numbers and those who are still out 
are no excessive burden to their 
union. With regard to the foolish 
circular all the unions written to 
have refused to give the required 
assurance and in return the employers 
threaten a genera! lock-out of all 
branches of the trade. The outlook 
is not in the least feared by the 
unions. 

Amongst small recent local trade 
disputes are the following: At 
Grimsby, eighty six carpenters and 
joiners struck for five days for an 
advance of 1 cent per hour (from 15 
to 16 cents). The advance was con- 
ceded. 

At Merthyr Tydvil, in Wales, sixty- 
two carpenters have concluded a 
seventeen days' strike advanta- 
geously. Wages have been advanced 
from 15 to 16 cents per hour and the. 
working week has been reduced from 
fifty- four to fifty-three hours in sum- 
mer and from fifty and one halt to 
forty eight hours in winter. The 
Arbroath (Scotland) unionists have 



an advance from 15 to 16 cents per 
hour. The carpenters of Bishop 
Auckland, a northern town, after 
being on strike since last June have 
received 1 cent pet hour rise and a 
new code of working rules. 

The Manchester carpenters and 
joiners, to the number of 3,500, have 
gain td an increase from 18 to 10 
cents per hour. This means an 
increase of about 50 cents per week 
per man, exclusive of any overtime. 
In Accnngton, Altrincham, Ashton 
under Lyne, Burnslev. Barrow in- 
Furness, Sheffield, Stockport, Wigan, 
Burton-on -Trent, Glossop, the Pot- 
teries, and many other places during 
the last month wages have been 
advanced, usually 1 cent per hour, 
and between four and five thousand 
carpenters and joiners participated in 
this upward movement. In three of 
the above districts decreased hours 
are also to be credited to the men 's 
agitation, 

The strike at Edinburgh, Scotland, 
which began on April t$th, for an 
advance from iS to tg cents per hour 
and other benefits, is still unsettled ; 
1 , 320 men are affected. 

Should the master builders carry 
out their threat to inaugurate a gen- 
eral retaliatory lock out throTgh the 
building trade it will probably start 
with a lock out of 25 per cent, of 
their employees after the end of this 
week. 

The Law and the Laborer. 



What the United Brotherhood Ilea 
Done. 



The people who have spasms over 
the passage of the Moore eight hour 
law are respectfully referred to the 
action of a similar law in I 'tah, which 
is eminently successful and has not 
operated to impose a hardship upon 
either the mine operator or employe*. 
These restrictive laws have been 
placed in operation through the Inflo 
ence of organized labor, in almost 
every locality throughout the United 
States and have been beneficial to 
both employer and employed. Tfaej 
give employment to 25 per cert, mon 
men than under the ten-hour system, 
and, no matter how the question of 
wages adjusts itself, the eight hour 
system is certainly consistent with 
conditions existing in every part of 
the world. Eight houra for labor, 
eight hours for recreation and eight 
hours for sleep is seemingly a correct 
ami sensible division of time; and 
since the United States has become a 
nation of hired men, there is every 
reason why the law should , .gulate 
these matters. 

From the stand point of utility nmst 
of the large mining companies have 
adopted the eight-hour system long 
since. 

In Montana the same practice is in 
vogue in all mines employing over 
fifteen men and operates beneficially. 
This exception was made in the 
Interest of the small leasers. 

In the social system every man un- 
employed la a threat, either to his 
fellow workmen or to society, and a 
law that is framed for the purpose of 
taking up 25 per cent, more labor is 
beneficial alike to employer, employee 
and society at large. 

—Lradville Miner. 



The United Hi' therhood of t .rprntets ib4 
joiners of America * ia founded In Convrnttea 
ut Chicago, AuKOat 12 Mi, At oral It had only 
twelve local anion* aud -,I£J mernher* Now id 

ses-entce ti v:ir«. it tois K roWB U> Number 42* :,, c ,i 
rjuloM in -HHiotn I, mid lia- tmra i.OOOenrel fi 

member. 14 inqranBleed m protect Uia Can at> 

If r Trade (torn llir rviN of low pHcea end h i vji. 
woik ; if* aim is to encourage it highei aUnden] 
of skill 1 br-ltet w*gi-. i to t< ■ -i il.il.>! > s 

Apprentice Byateoi, and to ! <"i m.i eaeUt iht 
member* hy mutual protection and benevolent 
Mean*; " P*y* a Wife funeral ftn.rt.t ol lien 
j*j.'i to *A>: a Member* Funeral Benefit « : i 
P0tt\ and a Mmbttliy Benefit, f WO to JM", 'n 
thr-*- iwrrai Benefit* ptt.OOU have •«:■'. 

prmlril the peat IW0 \i %T%, »U ! I •-■>.7i1.>mt^ < l.f 
peat » bile fflft '•!» ni re nj*fe ••(•*- n t i' I hi) 
period t'ir Sick Benefit* ly the local t'nutn. 
THtai* fully Otte aorta cjoarter Milti naof iiot 
Inseapi nded ffef bew vnii 1 hnrUaWe i>»r- 

po-.es. Such an ot jjnrii .• ittou I* worth the litee, 
tion of every Cat peat ei nc Itrothevhood u 
aba h protective Trod* t m u ai e/*tl la i 
Benevolent Society. It tiai • i the wages m 
Bttitdrarta ol citie-. tud plaee I niiiv five anH ■ 
n«if Million Dot tan mote was<M annnatly ii 
the po. wettuf Ike Cap enu t< In itn -■■ > inc> it 
reduced ilir boon ■ i labm to 8 hnurH rs day !■ 
106 cin-s. and I ti 'iir* a day i« f"ur hu i- 

died a«d tweoty-ctt ettfea, not t" apeak ol 

mniiytiiirn whuh Ii IVC ratal lUr H an.) I 

kOuf ayatem on Saturdaya, iiy thi« ni'»m 
r. i:tii more mm imn i;i,nif<t employmeat. 

This *■> Ike rr- ill ol iBofUdBk orna-ura. 

tinr. And yet very btvi str'k<« have occurred, 
nod very little money Ha* been rpent on Mukei 
Iiy tkt) t ictcty It kot .< Mcrtl i>Mli-'.ourtd 
organliatiofl, All eompitenl Carpealen >•( 
ellglbl* t» j and thi- c^r.', t- an Invitation to 
you as .10 Intrlltftent roechanli to nmti ia yoai 
kppllcatfoa lor naeanberahip in the Carpenten 
Union in youi city. It i" ■ branch of thl 
Brotherhood, it« .die* are anull 111 CMBparlmi 
with the tieneti".. and it ii la your iUt«f«at to 
join thU KrowinK and iiuvrerfnl iMjdy, 

Kulea kegardiiiic Apprentices. 



At the 1 letrou Convention of th^ rnite,; ; 1 c*t> 

erhood of Carpente'H at"1 Joinen of \nie. ji, 

held Angoata>ll,M|(i.tto« following mh>« m !,!§• 

tion to «;i|ire:itite^ arvrc approved an. I the I,.*a! 
t'niona are urgeo to serine t> ; , t- enfoteeniai I 

l+'Vfcm Thi rapid I nil III of unskilled an-! II 
comi*tent men in the rsrpentes Irs > has had 
of late years, a vrv >le; -e-^ini; and i n i n r i ■ ui 
effect upon the "ic haiuc. in the t'i.«in'»«. nni 
has a ten<lrtirv to deRTada tbt ..tao.lrtr.l of -kill 
nnd to ^ivr no enrotirairem^nt t^« voting mm H 

become appeeatteea and to maatct the ivadl 

thoronghlv ; tiierefi.re. in the hent int. rent, ol 
the rrafi , wr r'ectair ourarl»e« in fa»oi of the fol- 
lowing rulea : 

Skit' iv 1 The inde»itiirln(( ti >■ pprrnt !■ i « II 
the beat niean* rslcnUtr.t to ifivr that e,f.- h le| 

erblch it la deetmhle a earpeniei abottM ea>aaeej 
andci'o to love the ntttaaai a anaraniee to th» 
em ploy ere that some return wi'l be n.a.le to therri 
for a proper effort to t'ltn out mmi M'nl work- 
men ; t'lerefr.re. we direct that nil I..x/il t nioni 

under onr Juried ietion sh»n use every peaefMi 

mrnus, V/herever prartiiHl. t.i inlrrxliire the sye 
lem of Indenturing apei enticea. 

Ski 2. Any boy or p, rson hereaftrr enxaK'til 
himself to irarn the n« le ol t«'p> utry, •.hall tK 
required to seive a rexiiidi ipprenttceaht] r ' 
hni eooMLUtive yrars, and ahall not be ■ •■t'sr.i 
ered a jout nr vrnan tiiilr>.s lir !ins complied wl* 
thia rule, ami im iw-nty one years ol *ire al lh« 

com piet i,u oi kle apprantieeehtp. 

BBC, 3 Alt l^ya enteriiiK the rari>en(er lt«d» 

with the Intention of laaralni th.- bmrineen «hai: 

t>e he|<| |,y »((rr..m, Indanlare or written COk 
trar I for > t,im of f.mr years 

Sue t When n lioy shall hare Contracted witb 
■n employer lin'rvi rrrtwtn term ol years hf 
■bnlf, on no pretense wliale»er, !ea»e anid em- 
plover and contract with another, without thr 
full and frie conaent of aaid brat etiip!ovff. 
unleaa there ia Juat cause or that auch chani ■ il 
made in conaerpimee «f the death of rellnrjuilk' 
ment of biisjr.rsn by the firit employe* | anv ap 
prentice ao leavlriK ahall not 1* permitted t« 
work under the jurisdiction of any Local rmoB 
In our Brotherhfrfi-t, but shall he required lo re- 
turn to hii employer anil aerve out his aporee- 
tlceahip. 

SRC. 5. It ia enjoined upon each J .oral T'ntrji 
to make regulation* limiting the ounbet oi kp 
prentices to be employed in ench ahop or m*'l W 
one for auch number of journeymen as m*J 
eeera to the-i juat ; and all i?n!ona are recom- 
mended loiiiimitto menibershfp apiirrnl iirs In 
the lust year of their i orenticeahip. lo the end 
that, upon the csptralmn of their term a of ap 
prenticeahlp they may become acquainted wil» 
the workings of the Onion, and be better filtel 
to appreciate Ita privilege, and obligation. 
[full 




i 



11 



Proceeding* of the (Jeneral Executive 
Board. 



A pm i. 10. lum.— The ft. K. B. met at 1 o'clock 
A At. All the members were present. 

Appeal. Union .'{.<. Hislon, Mass., in J. Jones 
claim. Decision of ft. s.-T. sustained. 

Appeal, Union 'JI7. Brooklyn, N, V , to ften- 
erai Convention from the decision of L>. C. 
Case relerred In next Convention. 

Appeal of L>. C., OnlTWtOn, TM. , **. decision 
of (V S.-T. re Clearance Card, sustained. 

Decision of G. S.-T. In i]nim«for luner.d bene. 
fitmifC. Buckley Jfc I„ McKenna.St. I.utiifi, Mo., 



Hi ml liiv. t'nion II''. \t»n 
dered I decision ol Jhu 



mi t tarried. 

Appeal of k. J. 
cheat- r, N, It., coiihi 
nary I tli sustained. 

Appeal ol J. Steinharh ft at tw. Chicago. 11. C, 
•bataincd. but Sum should he reduced to ten 
dollar* in each Gttltf, 

Appeal. U. Carlson VI, Chicago, I>. C. Appeal 
not within limit prr tcribr-d by se, 1 . *Ui of Consti- 
tution and consequently dismissed. 

Ai'Mii. 11 in - Appe.,1 Union fit, Kensington, 
III., r j, decision of Chitsgo, D. C 'e three mem 
lieis Union KM fined, not sustai unl, as Sec, hu ol 
Constitution has not Wen complied with in 
iillu.; copy of appeal before the I). C See dtci - 
ion te Cailson n. Chicago, 1). C, 

Audit of books begun and occupied remainder 
of seMun. 

Appeal of | Hamming fs, adnislou of O, 1'. 
Action of ft. 1". sustained. (On Appeal HI, Chi- 

i igo, D. CO 

Appeal, Union MM, Newark, N, J. r>j. G. S.-T, 
Action of G, S.-T. sustained in hi* decision In 
enforce the provision * o( the law. 0, 1'. in- 
slrurled lo visit Union IMal and find what would 
Iw necessary to aid Union unhand to report im- 
mediately to i ,. K M. 

Apmi. I 'Til. Apical, I'nioii ISfi, t'tica.N.V. 

decision of (}. I*. Anion deferred until Union 

I 'J., sht wa that it had complied with Sec. 80 of 
Constitution. 

Appeal, OnilMI IR , Toronto Wi decision ol S • 
T, to extend charge ofj.'. Initiation fee to May I, 
I WW. Union 27 waul* it extended to May I , I WW. 
Keiiurst refused. 

D.Cof 1'hiladelphi.i appointed a Committee 
to visit O.K.B. at their meeting. Dr, id-d that 
Cominitee be heard but that requests by the 
Cirri mltee should In- placed be I ore ihe liaard in 
writing. 

Appeal, I'. Kerr tt, decision of Cleveland CM* 
venlion, dismissed. Sec. 71 of Constitution rovei* 
Kiiiuwl ftjMy ana the law must he carried out. 

Report of G. I", on various matter* in Die 
hand* for investigation and settlement, read Bnd 
carefully examined liy G Ii. 11. 

Decision off.. P asking t'nion 17 >, New Votk, 
to letuin at once the f',9a) IJQ death benelit laid 
In claim of J. Hirst hbiil, proved invalid, waa ma. 
lamed by I'.. K. It. 

iJeclsl'-n ul G. 1*. asking Union :!7'\ New York, 
to I el ur u at once the JJ' 00 in clliltn death hene- 
Iil ol }■'. Hmf. pro*, d invalid, at«f sustained by 
G. K. II. 

Balance of Session taken up in discussing Ihut 
part of ft I' 's repurt relating to troutite enisling 
between Ihe V, II. and the New York City car 

Dealer*. 

Ai-hil Mill. AV-.une.sion id t'nion I Of, l.ynn, 
Mm«.. It Wiadecidtd to a' nd a representative to 
New I'lngland ht.ttex to counteract the work 
done by Ihe reptemenlativea of the aeceaalon 
movement. 

Appeal, of 11. Meyer, I nion 32, San l-'rantiaco. 
M. t nion '^i! hitstaineil, and Union '±1 cMmcted 
to pay alck benelit m* J. 8- Andera, the benefi- 
ciary had notloat liia benefit nil account ol work- 
lux oulaideof the jarttdtcllon of fuion 

AV controver-y between New Yort. 1». C. and 
Hatavla and N, V. Wood Woiking Co UllloiMOj 
^f. Y. ahould handle the prodml ol aald him, no 
iufoimation funiUhed to change former dec! 
mini of O. K. B. 

kt controvt ray 1'. tt. m. N, V. city cnrj'eiitera, 
the aetlleiuenl ii left in the hand* of Ihe (*„ I'. 
■ ud O, S.-T. 

Appeal, of P< C. t'nion, of New Yolk, lo 
InlllMte on niuht ol application dUmiatied. Sec 
71 ol Conatitution iiiuat be auatalned. 

Application, lor sanction of strike of Union V*. 
Troy, N. Y., appioved, lluancial «id to tie 
decided on after report of deputy to lie appointed 
had been leceived, 

llatauce of ar'Hsion taken up In reading nolicea 
ol tiade-movements, end application a lor aaala- 
tance from different pnrls of Ihr count ly. 

Ai'Kit. 14th.— Coniniunicallona were lead pei- 
lainiDK to the rrlui.il of Union lol, of New York, 
to comply with the law in regard to being rep- 
resented In the II. C. of the lioroii^h of Hi 'ina. 
G. 1''. B. decldea that Union JM must aeud .lele- 
gatea to the Council of the Borough of Bronx a« 
Sec. 47a of the Constitutioti require* II. 

Reque*' to auataln demand made by D. C 
rittaburg for half holiday on Saturday and mairi- 
taititna nine-hour day during real of week not 
agreed to. PlUHburg MUrKI aliould (1 rat exact 
the eight-hour day. financial aid to be decided 
later, 

Nine-iiourdaj ..aked for by Union 2111, Torrlng- 
Cnlon adetaed to atand fi rm for their 

I f*3f Tstd UCtl OD of tlOUrM 



Request for financial aid from Union* 177 and 
Wi. Springfield, Maaa. Financial aid not deemed 
neceasary, and they should first secure the eight- 
hour day. 

Application, for financial aid. Union 382, 
r-ecksville, Pa., refused. Sec. IX> ol Constitution 
makes it impossible. Trust the Union will suc- 
ceed witbo'it aid. 

Re tt, J. Holey In disability claim, former .1, 
cislon ol Q, K. It. tustalned. 

financial aid for Union 43 New Rochelle, 
granted to inaugurate eight-hour day. Report 
from Deputy to be buals for aid. Movement 
sanctioned by f'„ H. B. 

financial aid for demand for eight-hour day 
and increase in wages, Union, Scranton, 
promised after report fiom I>epuly. Movement 
appioved by O. K, B. 

Application for 1Ujn from Union 490, Pasasic, 
N, J , laid over data incomplete. 

financial aid promised if neceaaary to I>. C, 
ol Chicago, for movement for new wage scale 
Hnd for hall holiday on S iturday. Deputy to t>e 
appointed if necessary by ft. S - T. 

Aid lor nine-hour day. Union (03, Wilkesbarre. 
Pa , promised- Rept>rr from tiepury to be basis 
for aid. 

Al l for Unions In Jersey City :uui Jlolaiken 
promised, same aa in Union I'J ol New Kocltelle. 

Application from I). C. of Syracuse, N. Y., lor 
financial aaiivtance. G. K, 11. diiects attention 
to Sec, of Conatitution pages 3n, 21 and 22, nntl 
nppeal not favored. 

Aid to Union l^il, rjulncy. 111., promised, same 
aa Union 1', of New Rochelle. 

Application for aid from Union 0, Amsterdam, 
N. Y,, not heing complete, action was deferred. 
Report from Sec. I>, C. Cleveland. Refeired 
to G. S.-T. to procure fui itpr in formation. 

Aid for Union W., Belleville, ill., promised, 
same aa Union 4J 

Sanction and financial Id o Union H.7, Bliza- 
btth, N. J„ held over a .11 later. Most con- 
traclora have signed agreement. 

support in the denintul o! Union ferth 
Amboy, deemed unadvised • recommended to 
modify ilcmarid. sclion deferred. 

Action on application of t*i,lon Id, Racine, 
Wla,, deferred for further Information, 

AmtL 1 .ill -Additional Report by the G. P. 
on maitera itfeired to him and ft. s.-T, at the 
January meeting. 

Hirst. I'lan for securing funds lor heller or- 
ganisation ol the trade Deferred for coosu na- 
tion with ft. K, B. 

second, Warranl for arrest of H C. Schneider 
obtained. Action t>i ft,. 1>. and (1, S.-T. appioved 
and ordered to proceed w.th proaecutioii. 

Application, 1). C. of Philadelphia for reiluc- 
lion of initiate in fee to $1 tu. D. C. referred to 
G. S.-T. 

Quarterly audit wss taken up during the lat- 
lei part of the session. 

Discussion eif pl«n- for putting organUers in 
the field in all sections of the country took up 
lialance of s,ssion. 

A I- it ii. IT til- Application for organ iiter. U hp n 
1J7, omaha, Neb., I). C. of Milwaukee and Sta- 
plelon, S. t. O. P. and G, S -T. Instructed to 
appoint oigmiifets. A sum not to exceed f,., OKI 
to he -el a-ule lor organisers, all ov er t he country. 

Applicsliona New York I>. C > t ntairtuillders 
to be taktn into the U. B. not aualalned, 
inlormation askerl lor not having been furnished 
as to Sec. I of pro[Kj»ed agreement, which 
applies to comlillons on which uienhera will be 
taken into lite U. B. 

Anion of ft. 1' and ft. S.-T. in taking offices In 
l.lppincott building endorsed. 

Appeal, Mary Maus claim taken from last 
meeting, ihe derision ol G. 8,-T. disapproving 
claim not sti-tained. 

Report if Schneider. SchiK ider coulii not be 
found at present, ft. K. » accepted the report as 
progress. 

Union U3 aaked to prefer charges against 
Schneider, sec. ISS and im of Constitution, and 
expel him In accoi dance with last par|graph ot 

Sec. 170. 

fiUgetald 1 1. Chicago, ©, C, hla appeal not 
sustained. 

Balance of seasiou taken up wilh quarterly 
Audit. 

Aran. IMril, -Audit of buoka waa taken upand 

concluded, 

HITMMAHY 909 JANUARY, I'KKHCAHV AND 
MARCH. IKIf.t. 

Balance on hand, isn. 1st ftMM ::7 

Receipts : 

January 7.t;:L"i lis 

Hebruary ttff fh 

March 7,lyj MO 

|4Vu,Ml 7(1 

Kxpenaes 

January fll, luo 10 

fehtuary II.MU 41 

MftrcK , * i i »», f^m^i p So' t 

(I l.i h| H7 

Balance on hand April I, MM $fi,ira m 

A'e N. Y. D. C. and Stalrbuilderi of New York, 
letter received dated April tilth. G. 8,-T. in- 
atructed to submit matter by mall to al members 
of the Board for a vote, t wo members having 



Also, communication from Brooklyn U C to 
enforce trade rules. May 1st. to be submitted to 
Board by mail. 
Adjourned to meet July 10, 

J K. Mir.Lt-:". 
Attest : Sec. G h. II. 

P J. McfttuaR, 

Cenerai Ser.-ltrjs. 




Oemands of American Federation of 



1. Compulsory education. 

2. Direct legislation through the 
initiative and referendum, 

3. A legal workday of not more 
than eight hours. 

4. Sanitary inspection of workshop, 
mine and home. 

5. Liability of employers for injury 
to health, body and life. 

6. The abolition of the contract 
system in all public work. 

7. The abolition of the sweating 
system. 

8. The municipal ownership of 
street cars, water works and gas and 
electric plants for public distribution 
of light, heat and power. 

9. The nationalization of telegraph, 
telephone, railroads and mines. 

10. The abolition of the monopoly 
system of land holding, and »ubf ti- 
tuting therefor a title :)f occupancy 
and use only. 

11. Repeal all conspiracy and penal 
laws affecting seamen and other 
workmen incorporated in the Federal 
and state laws of the United States. 

12. The abolition of the monopoly 
privilege of issuing money and sub- 
stituting therefor a system of direct 
issuance to and by the people. 



English Pluck. 



Maybe It was at Isandula, with 
Lord Chelmsford's army, or it may 
have been elsewhere in Africa, but, 
at any rate, during the Zulu War, 
says Collier' 's ll'trlc/v. after an engage- 
ment in which the British troops weie 
defeated by Cetewayo's black warriors, 
and were compelled to fly for their 
lives, an Flngllsh cavalryman, whose 
scraggy little pony limped from an 
assegai slash, detached himself from 
the retreat and galloped back upon 
the charging Zulus, A glance over 
his shoulder had shown him a dis- 
mounted comrade, stumbling pain- 
fully along trying to jam some cart- 
ridges into his clogged revolver. 
When the trooper's pony trotted up 
the Zulus were almost upon the two 
soldiers ; fortunately they had dis- 
carded their spears and were mishand- 
ling captured carbines. Now, in a 
melodrama, or in a realistic novel edi- 
fying to schoolgirls, the language of 
these two gallant soldiers, one to the 
other, there amid the squealing Zulu 
bullets, would have benn noble, lofty, 
inspiring and godlike. This is what 
they really said : 

"Get out o' this, BUI, ye bloomin' 
ijit — the black beggars'U skewer 
you ! " gasped the wounded man. 
" You climb up on this 'orse or I'll 
ch your d— n head oft I » was the 
reply from the trooper. 

And it is delightful to be able to 
say that he did climb up, and they 
both escaped from the "bl^ck beg- 
gr.ni. " and the trooper got the Vic- 
toria Cross. 



(Imetitnni under Mm keadcoM ten eentt a line.) 



t'NIOM IM, Toprka, Kawa. 

Vi mekba*, it hs* pleased Almighty God, Ihe 
BuiTderof Ihls ^reat I nirerse, to remove from 
our midst Hhothkr Wii liam 11. Tu mp. 

WUUIU, The me. uhera of Ixjcal I'nion No. 
I At feel the loss of a faithful Bro'her and an 
earnest promoter of unionism, therefore be It 

ffeiolved. That we drape our charter for thirty 
days, and express our sincere sympathy to the 
bereaved family of our deceased bi other. Also 
he it 

A'eio'ved. That a copy of these resolutions be 
apread on the minutes of r,ur meeting, that a 
copy be presented to the family, and that they 
be sent for publication In the official paper. 
M. J. Kami.kr, 

Wim.iam Fav. y Committe'. 
S. B. Wkavkb. 



) 



I'M. >N 4H, I'AHSAIC, N. J, 

Witt'icAi, It hai pleased t he Al mi K hty ftod In 
llisin finite wisdom, to remove from our Brother- 
hood, our eateeraet Brother, I.iKrORD Van 
WiNKt.it, who departed this life May 5, leUH. 
Theref&re, 

He it Rtsnlvtd, That we drape our Charier for 
Thirty days, and that we express our sympathy 
to the bereaved family of our decea-ed Brother. 
Alao be it 

Ktsnlvd, That a copy of these resolutions be 
spread on the min ute of our inert i ng, also a copy 
be presented to the family, also a copy h» puh- 
ti-hed in our official Juurnal, The Cake-bxtkh, 
also a copy hr published in a local paper. 
John Qt'AiJi.ANn, 1 
11 w. Km, 1 ..k, L Cemm'ttt*. 
ii, J, MnitRiaori I 



I'mion 7, MiNNBAPni.ia, Minn. 
Whi.bkas, It has pleased the Master Builder 
ol the universe in remove from our midst our 
late respected Brother Anprkw Ciirihtrnson, 
therefore be it 

A'esmvfd, That the brothers of I,. U. No. 7, 
of Minneapolis, mourn the loss of Brother 
An drew Ch ristrnson, and extend its sym- 
pathy to the bereaved widow and children in 
their hour of afllictlon, and we trnat that the 
severity of the blow may be mitigated by the 
remembrance that we will all meet again in the 
Celeilial Home above, and be It luriher 

Uttalwd . That our charter be draped for thirty 
days, and that these resolutions be spread upon 
the minutes, a copy presented to the widow and 
children, and also published In our 
organ, 1 hk CaRi*knTK», 

TlfO:i. SRTNAN, 

Committee. 



TlfOs. SRTNAN, \ 
JOHN WAI.IJ L' 1ST, L 
CHAS BKTTOAIT, J 



WhkrkaS, It has pleased Almighty ftod to call 
away Irum earth the wife of our Brother, Gt'ST. 
Larson. Therefoie, be it 

fea aVina fi "I hat we, members of Carpenters 
Union No. 7, of Minneapolis, tender our sincere 
ay 111 pat by to the bereaved husband and cnll- 
dren. And be 11 further 

Kewt-. fd, That a copy of these resolutions L.. 
presented to the husband, and al>o published In 
our official paper, Tutt CiKi'snriii. 
Signed. 

THOMAS SKTNAN, v 

JOHN WA1.UUI5T, \ Commute*. 

C1IAKI.HS SKTTft AST. ) 



Thk consumption of beer per head 
of population is as follows : Bavaria, 
55 gallons ; German Umpire, 25 ' 2 gal- 
lons ; Belgium, 44 gallons ; United 
Kingdom, jl ; Western Australia, 25 ; 
Denmark, 20 ; Switzerland, 14 ■ the 
United States, Austria, (Queensland 
Victoria, 1 2 gallons ; Sweden, 9 gal- 
lons. 

a* 

Wr have been reliably informed 
that the trade on Uane's steel jack 
has been steadily increasing and it is 
now generally recognized as standard. 
The new size known as No. o, we are 
told is available for a great amount of 
light work. It can be sold at such a 
price that it is believed it will find a 
large sale where previously cheap 
wooden affairs have been used or no 
jack at all. All sizes are now also 
offered galvanized. The makers are 
Lane Brothers Company, Poughkeep- 
sie, N. Y. Advertisement in another 



t 



THE CARPENTER. 



Bevels, Splays and Hopper Cuts, — i, 



BY KBEI). T. HODGSON, 

DN taking up the above sub^ 
jects, It is my intention to 
deal with them pretty thor- 
oughly, and to tell my 
readers pretty much all that 
is to be found in the various works on 
construction about them. In doing 
so I will be obliged to quote from 
many authors and from many fugitive 
writings, but in every case where I 
borrow from others, I will, when 
possible, give due credit for same. 
Indeed, the subjects have been so pro- 
fusely discussed during the last cen- 
tury, that very tittle is left for me, or 
aty one else to add uiuch that can 
properly be called original. The 
same may be said of the alphabet, for 
while it can not be called original, in 
a true sense, yet, it is original or new 
to the mind of every child that 
wrestles with it So with bevels, 
splays and hopper cuts i each genera- 
tion as it falls into line as a worker 
and world Improver must wrestle with 
these subjects, and to Its membtrs the 
problems and their solutions are as 
new and original as though they had 
never been heard or spoken of before 
the day the new workers requfre to 
know of them. In all trades the be- 
ginner must start at the lowest rung 
of the ladder— there is no commencing 
where our fathers left off— the a, b, c, 
of carpentry and joinery must be 
learned by the would be workman just 
as surely as the a, b, c, of scholarship 
must be learned by the literary 
student before any headway can be 
made in expert workmanship or in 
literary science ; and, in the noble art 
of wood construction, success can only 
be won by continual effort and a thor- 
ough mastering of the intricate prob- 
lems that are sure to beset the path 
of the aspiring craftsman. 

While, as stated above, it is almost 
impossible to present anything that 
will be entirely new, it may be pos- 
sible to present the old old problems 
and their solutions in such a dress as 
to make their recognition much 
easier and the work of digesting 
them, a source of pleasure rather 
than one of painful labor and effort. 

In order to make myself clear on 
the various subjects under discussion, 
I think it meet to first give such 
definitions of the subjects that any- 
thing I may say hereafter will not 
conflict with any preconceived ideas 
the reader may have imbibed from 
custom or false phraseology. 

Bevel Is described by Century 
Dictionary as "The obliquity or in- 
clination of a particular surface of a 
BOiid body to another surface of the 
same body ; the angle curtained by 
two adjacent sides of anything, as of 
a timber used in shipbuilding. When 
this angle is acute it is called an 
under bevel {or beveling), and when 
obtuse a standing bevel." 

Knight says " a bevel is any angle 
except of 90 . ' * The words slope and 
chamfer are synonymous with bevel in 
many of their applications. 

Splay: spread, flare. In building 
a sloped surface, or a surface which 
makes an